Where CIRM Funding Goes

CIRM has one singular mission: to accelerate stem cell treatments to patients with unmet medical needs.

A dedication to this mission guides every action by CIRM. With a team of dedicated staff and with oversight from its governing Board, CIRM funds promising research programs that are poised to transform stem cells into cures.

California's Stem Cell Agency was created in 2004 when 59% of California voters approved Proposition 71: the California Stem Cell Research and Cures Initiative. That initiative created the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) to fund stem cell research in the state. In addition to creating the agency, Prop 71 created a 29-member governing Board composed of researchers, business leaders and patient advocates. Read more about the creation of CIRM here.

Where Our Funding Goes

Proposition 71 allocated a total of $3 billion. Of that $3 billion, Prop 71 around $2.75 billion was set aside to be awarded to directly to research, facilities and training the next generation of stem cell scientists (see graph at left).[1] The remainder was then earmarked for staff and administration to help oversee the funding and awards.

CIRM's governing Board has awarded $1.9B to different institutions, companies and researchers but only $1.4B of that has gone out. Of the remainder, it is estimated that about $100M will be returned to CIRM, either from cost savings as the projects progress or from programs that are cancelled because they failed to meet their goals.

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