Sanford-Burnham

How a stem cell forms a neuron

CIRM grantees at Sanford-Burnham have published another paper using an embryonic stem cell model to understand one of the earliest steps in human nervous system development. (We've blogged about their work before here.)

CIRM grantees directly create neuronal stem cells for research and therapies

CIRM grantees at the Scripps Research Institute, University of California, San Diego and Sanford-Burnham Research Institute have taken an intriguing step toward producing neural progenitor cells for research or therapies. The team, led by Sheng Ding who has recently moved to the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco, started with mouse skin cells and converted them directly to an early stage of neural cell. The work was published in the April 26 online issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Shifting the balance of stem cell renewal and cancer

There's an interesting story from CIRM grantees at Sanford-Burnham this week, showing a relationship between tissue-specific stem cells in the body and cancer. It all started with an observation in people with Down Syndrome: they are less likely than other people to develop cancers.

Making neurons lose their inhibitions

CIRM grantees at Sanford-Burnham have just published an interesting paper in PLoS Biology about developing a type of neuron that could alleviate symptoms of Huntington's disease, autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder - all diseases in which some neurons lose their inhibitions.

Stem cells reveal elusive developmental steps, origins of disease

Our colleagues at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute have a post today on their excellent blog about work by CIRM grantee Alexey Turskikh, published in a recent issue of PLoS ONE. The teams work is another example of how embryonic stem cells can help scientists understand early events in development.

iPS developments - faster creation, but questions raised

Two pieces of news came out today about reprogrammed iPS cells - one showing a new way of making them and the other suggesting that they may not be all they're cracked up to be.

Stem cell therapies for diabetes: wrap them up

A pancreatic bet

Stem cell videos make the grade

One amazing aspect of living in the era of social media is the incredible way information spreads. A butterfly batting its little orange wings in a monarch grove in Santa Cruz could influence a tweet of a blogger heard 'round the world.
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