Disease Team

CIRM HIV/AIDS disease team technology makes news

Richmond-based Sangamo BioSciences has been making a lot of news lately with their gene editing technology. Theirs is the technique being used in CIRM'S HIV Disease Team Award to John Zaia at The City of Hope (summarized in this San Francisco Business Journal story).

Techniques for tracking stem cells necessary for possible therapies

Last week The Scientist carried a story addressing a topic near and dear to the heart of anyone trying to develop a therapy based on transplanting stem cells, whether they are embryonic, adult, or iPS cells: Where do the cells go once they are transplanted?

Celebrating National Cancer Research Month with a cancer stem cell round-up

In celebration of National Cancer Research Month, our colleagues at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute have posted a series of blog entries about cancer research at their institute. The latest installment includes CIRM grantee Robert Wechsler-Reya, who moved to California from Duke University on a CIRM Research Leadership Award.

More on the Berlin patient, stem cells, and a cure for HIV

The response to the story about the Berlin patient who was reported cured of  HIV has been incredible, but in this case it's also a little troubling. What I see in comments on news stories or in tweets is that we have an uphill battle in terms of educating people about stem cells.

Stem cell therapy treats HIV, basis for two CIRM disease teams

There's a lot of buzz today over a paper in the journal Blood declaring a man who has come to be known as the "Berlin patient" cured of HIV.

HIV/AIDS video for World AIDS Day

World AIDS Day seems like a good time to revisit a video we made this year featuring CIRM board member Jeff Sheehy, who is a long-time advocate for HIV/AIDS research:

ACT files to test embryonic stem cell-based therapy for macular degeneration

Advanced Cell Technology has filed an application with the FDA to begin an early phase trial of an embryonic stem cell-based therapy for macular degeneration. If the company name sounds familiar, that's because it's the same company that on November 22 received FDA approval to begin a trial for Stargardt's macular degeneration. Both trials are testing the same cells. In a press release, the company said:

Vision loss trial based on embryonic stem cells begins

The FDA has given the green light to the second trial based on embryonic stem cells - this one for a genetic form of blindness called Stargardt's Macular Degeneration. The treatment, developed by Advanced Cell Technology, involves replacing the the layer of the retina damaged by the disease, called the retinal pigment epithelium, with new RPE cells derived from embryonic stem cells.

Patient advocates vital to stem cell research progress

Nature Medicine carried a piece Friday by CIRM governing board member Jeff Sheehy, writing about the importance of having a patient advocate voice in biomedical research. Sheehy, who is living with HIV, is a long-time advocate for HIV/AIDS research. He has been on the CIRM board since the beginning in November 2004, and is a vocal participant in CIRM working groups including the group that makes research funding recommendations to the full board (the Grants Working Group), for which he is vice-chair.

Artist inspired by HIV/AIDS therapies

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