Chasing Mavericks: The quest for defining developmental waves of hematopoiesis.

Journal: 
Curr Top Dev Biol
Publication Year: 
2019
Authors: 
Taylor Cool
E Camilla Forsberg
PubMed link: 
30797507
Public Summary: 
Hematopoiesis is the process by which mature blood and immune cells are produced from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSCs and HSPCs). The last several decades of research have shed light on the origin of HSCs, as well as the heterogeneous pools of fetal progenitors that contribute to lifelong hematopoiesis. The overarching concept that hematopoiesis occurs in dynamic, overlapping waves throughout development, with each wave contributing to both continuous and developmentally limited cell types, has been solidified over the years. However, recent advances in our ability to track the production of hematopoietic cells in vivo have challenged several long-held dogmas on the origin and persistence of distinct hematopoietic cell types. In this review, we highlight emerging concepts in hematopoietic development and identify unanswered questions.
Scientific Abstract: 
Hematopoiesis is the process by which mature blood and immune cells are produced from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSCs and HSPCs). The last several decades of research have shed light on the origin of HSCs, as well as the heterogeneous pools of fetal progenitors that contribute to lifelong hematopoiesis. The overarching concept that hematopoiesis occurs in dynamic, overlapping waves throughout development, with each wave contributing to both continuous and developmentally limited cell types, has been solidified over the years. However, recent advances in our ability to track the production of hematopoietic cells in vivo have challenged several long-held dogmas on the origin and persistence of distinct hematopoietic cell types. In this review, we highlight emerging concepts in hematopoietic development and identify unanswered questions.