Heart Disease

Coding Dimension ID: 
295
Coding Dimension path name: 
Heart Disease

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Cardiovascular Diagnostics

Funding Type: 
New Cell Lines
Grant Number: 
RL1-00639
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 708 560
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Toxicity
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Our objective is to use induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology to produce a cell-based test for long QT syndrome (LQTS), a major form of sudden cardiac death. Nearly 500,000 people in the US die of sudden cardiac death each year. LQTS can be triggered by drug exposure or stresses. Drug-induced LQTS is the single most common reason for drugs to be withdrawn from clinical trials, causing major setbacks to drug discovery efforts and exposing people to dangerous drugs. In most cases, the mechanism of drug-induced LQTS is unknown. However, there are genetic forms of LQTS that should allow us to make iPS cell–derived heart cells that have the key features of LQTS. Despite the critical need, current tests for drug-induced LQTS are far from perfect. As a result, potentially unsafe drugs enter clinical trials, endangering people and wasting millions of dollars in research funds. When drugs causing LQTS such as terfenadine (Seldane) enter the market, millions of people are put at serious risk. Unfortunately it is very difficult to know when a drug will cause LQTS, since most people who develop LQTS have no known genetic risk factors. The standard tests for LQTS use animal models or hamster cells that express human heart genes at high levels. Unfortunately, cardiac physiology in animal models (rabbits and dogs) differs from that in humans, and hamster cells lack many key features of human heart cells. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be differentiated into heart cells, but we do not know the culture conditions that would make the assay most similar to LQTS in a living person. These problems could be solved if we had a method to grow human heart cells from people with genetic LQTS mutations, so that we know the exact test conditions that would reflect the human disease. This test would be much more accurate than currently available tests and would help enable the development of safer human pharmaceuticals. Our long-term goal is to develop a panel of iPS cell lines that better represent the genetic diversity of the human population. Susceptibility to LQTS varies, and most people who have life-threatening LQTS have no known genetic risk factors. We will characterize iPS cells that have well-defined mutations that have clinically proven responses to drugs that cause LQTS. These iPS cell lines will be used to refine testing conditions. To validate the iPS cell–based test, the results will be directly compared to the responses in people. These studies will provide the foundation for an expanded panel of iPS cell lines from people with other genetic mutations and from people who have no genetically defined risk factor but still have potentially fatal drug-induced LQTS. This growing panel of iPS cell lines should allow for testing drugs for LQTS more effectively and accurately than any current test.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Heart disease is the leading killer of adults in the Western world. Nearly 500,000 people in the US die of sudden cardiac death each year. Our goal is to develop a cell-based test to screen for drugs that can cause sudden cardiac death. Drug-induced cardiac side effects are the most common reason for withdrawal of drugs from clinical trials, causing major setbacks to drug discovery efforts. Therefore our test we will improve the safety of pharmaceuticals. Our test will also reduce the change that a drug in development will fail during clinical trials, thereby decreasing the financial risk for pharmaceutical companies. The results of our studies will help develop new technology that is likely to contribute to the California biotechnology industry. Our studies will develop multiple lines of iPS cells with unique genetic characteristics. These cell lines could be valuable for biotechnology companies and researchers who are screening for drug compounds. We are working closely with California companies to develop new microscopes, assay devices, and analytical software that could be the basis for new product lines or new businesses. If therapies do come to fruition, we anticipate that California medical centers will be leading the way. The most important contribution of this study will be to improve the health of Californians. Heart disease is a major cause of mortality and morbidity, resulting in billions of dollars in health care costs and lost days at work. Our goal is to contribute research that would ultimately improve the quality of life and increase productivity for millions of people who suffer from heart disease.
Progress Report: 
  • Nearly 500,000 people in the US die of sudden cardiac death each year, and long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a major form of sudden cardiac death. LQTS can be triggered by drug exposure or stresses. Drug-induced LQTS is the single most common reason for drugs to be withdrawn from clinical trials, causing major setbacks to drug discovery efforts and exposing people to dangerous drugs. In most cases, the mechanism of drug-induced LQTS is unknown. However, there are genetic forms of LQTS that should allow us to make iPS cell–derived heart cells that have the key features of LQTS. Our objective is to produce a cell-based test for LQTS with induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology, which allows adult cells to be “reprogrammed” to be stem cell–like cells.
  • Despite the critical need, current tests for drug-induced LQTS are far from perfect. As a result, potentially unsafe drugs enter clinical trials, endangering people and wasting millions of dollars in research funds. When drugs that cause LQTS, such as terfenadine (Seldane), enter the market, millions of people are put at serious risk. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to know when a drug will cause LQTS, since most people who develop LQTS have no known genetic risk factors. The standard tests for LQTS use animal models or hamster cells that express human heart genes at high levels. Unfortunately, cardiac physiology in animal models (rabbits and dogs) differs from that in humans, and hamster cells lack many key features of human heart cells. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be differentiated into heart cells, but we do not know the culture conditions that would make the assay most similar to LQTS in a living person. These problems could be solved if we had a method to grow human heart cells from people with genetic LQTS mutations, so that we know the exact test conditions that would reflect the human disease. This test would be much more accurate than currently available tests and would help enable the development of safer human pharmaceuticals.
  • Our long-term goal is to develop a panel of iPS cell lines that better represent the genetic diversity of the human population. Susceptibility to LQTS varies, and most people who have life-threatening LQTS have no known genetic risk factors. We will characterize iPS cells with well-defined mutations that have clinically proven responses to drugs that cause LQTS. These iPS cell lines will be used to refine testing conditions. To validate the iPS cell–based test, the results will be directly compared to the responses in people. These studies will provide the foundation for an expanded panel of iPS cell lines from people with other genetic mutations and from people who have no genetically defined risk factor but still have potentially fatal drug-induced LQTS. This growing panel of iPS cell lines should allow for testing drugs for LQTS more effectively and accurately than any current test.
  • To meet these goals, we made a series of iPS cells that harbor different LQTS mutations. These iPS cells differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes. We are now evaluating these LQTS cell lines in cellular assays. We are hopeful that our studies will meet or exceed all the aims of our original proposal.
  • Nearly 500,000 people in the US die of sudden cardiac death each year, and long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a major form of sudden cardiac death. LQTS can be triggered by drug exposure or stresses. Drug-induced LQTS is the single most common reason for drugs to be withdrawn from clinical trials, causing major setbacks to drug discovery efforts and exposing people to dangerous drugs. In most cases, the mechanism of drug-induced LQTS is unknown. However, there are genetic forms of LQTS that should allow us to make iPS cell–derived heart cells that have the key features of LQTS. Our objective is to produce a cell-based test for LQTS with induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology, which allows adult cells to be “reprogrammed” to be stem cell–like cells.
  • Despite the critical need, current tests for drug-induced LQTS are far from perfect. As a result, potentially unsafe drugs enter clinical trials, endangering people and wasting millions of dollars in research funds. When drugs that cause LQTS, such as terfenadine (Seldane), enter the market, millions of people are put at serious risk. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to know when a drug will cause LQTS, since most people who develop LQTS have no known genetic risk factors. The standard tests for LQTS use animal models or hamster cells that express human heart genes at high levels. Unfortunately, cardiac physiology in animal models (rabbits and dogs) differs from that in humans, and hamster cells lack many key features of human heart cells. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be differentiated into heart cells, but we do not know the culture conditions that would make the assay most similar to LQTS in a living person. These problems could be solved if we had a method to grow human heart cells from people with genetic LQTS mutations, so that we know the exact test conditions that would reflect the human disease. This test would be much more accurate than currently available tests and would help enable the development of safer human pharmaceuticals.
  • Our long-term goal is to develop a panel of iPS cell lines that better represent the genetic diversity of the human population. Susceptibility to LQTS varies, and most people who have life-threatening LQTS have no known genetic risk factors. We will characterize iPS cells with well-defined mutations that have clinically proven responses to drugs that cause LQTS. These iPS cell lines will be used to refine testing conditions. To validate the iPS cell–based test, the results will be directly compared to the responses in people. These studies will provide the foundation for an expanded panel of iPS cell lines from people with other genetic mutations and from people who have no genetically defined risk factor but still have potentially fatal drug-induced LQTS. This growing panel of iPS cell lines should allow for testing drugs for LQTS more effectively and accurately than any current test.
  • To meet these goals, we have made a series of iPS cells that harbor different LQTS mutations. These iPS cells differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes. We are now evaluating these LQTS cell lines in cellular assays. We are hopeful that our studies will meet or exceed all the aims of our original proposal.
  • Cardiac arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Yet we lack appropriate human tissue models to develop new therapies of this deadly disease. Despite the importance of this disease, the current in vitro models utilize overexpressed channels in fibroblasts that do not accurately recapitulate human cardiac myocytes. With our CIRM funding, we greatly improved our in vitro models by using cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) from donors who harbor cardiac arrhythmia mutations. We enrolled a series of research subjects with genetic forms of LQTS. All participants in our study signed a consent form that was approved by the UCSF human subjects committee. We found that iPS cell–derived cardiomyocytes developed disease-related phenotypes in vitro that could be readily demonstrated by electrophysiological techniques. Such measurements enabled the pharmacological characterization of underlying mechanisms of disease and may point to potential novel therapies. The CIRM funding has allowed our laboratory develop new methods for human disease modeling in iPS cell–derived tissues. This project served as a critical catalyst for human disease research that would otherwise be impossible.

A new paradigm of lineage-specific reprogramming

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-06035
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 708 560
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Directly Reprogrammed Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Recently, we devised and reported a new regenerative medicine paradigm that entails temporal/transient overexpression of induced pluripotent stem cell based reprogramming factors in skin cells, leading to the rapid generation of “activated” cells, which can then be directed by specific growth factors and small molecules to “relax” back into various defined and homogenous tissue-specific precursor cell types (including nervous cells, heart cells, blood vessel cells, and pancreas and liver progenitor cells), which can be expanded and further differentiated into mature cells entirely distinct from fibroblasts. In this proposal, combined with small molecules that can functionally replace reprogramming transcription factors as well as substantially improve reprogramming efficiency and kinetics, we aim to further develop and mechanistically characterize chemically defined, non-integrating approaches (e.g., mRNA, miRNA, episomal plasmids and/or small molecule-based) to robustly and efficiently reprogram skin fibroblast cells into expandable heart precursor cells. Specifically, we will: determine if we can use non-integrating methods to destabilize human fibroblasts and facilitate their direct reprogramming into the heart precursor cells; characterize of heart cells generated by the direct programming methods, both in the tissue culture dish and in a mouse model of heart attack; and characterize newly identified reprogramming enhancing small molecules mechanistically.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This study will develop and mechanistically characterize a new method of generating safe patient specific heart cells that could be useful in treating heart failure which afflicts millions of Californians and accounts for billions of dollars in healthcare spending annually. Additionally, the small molecules discovered in this study could be good candidates for future drug development as well as being broadly useful for other regenerative medicine applications. These advances could also be a platform for new personalized medicine/ cell banking businesses which could bring economic growth in addition to improving the health of Californians.
Progress Report: 
  • During the reporting period, we have made very significant progress toward the following research aims: (1) Using the Oct4-based reprogramming assay system established, we were able to screen for and identify small molecules that can replace the other three genes in the Cell-Activation and Signaling-Directed (CASD) lineage conversion paradigm for reprogramming fibroblasts into cardiac lineage. (2) Using in-depth assays, we have examined the process using lineage-tracing methods and characterized those Oct4/small molecules-reprogrammed cardiac cells in vitro. (3) Most importantly, we were able to identify a baseline condition that appears to reprogram human fibroblasts into cardiac cells using defined conditions.

Center of Excellence for Stem Cell Genomics

Funding Type: 
Genomics Centers of Excellence Awards (R)
Grant Number: 
GC1R-06673-A
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$40 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Brain Cancer
Cancer
Developmental Disorders
Heart Disease
Cancer
Genetic Disorder
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
Adult Stem Cell
Cancer Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
Public Abstract: 
The Center of Excellence in Stem Cell Genomics will bring together investigators from seven major California research institutions to bridge two fields – genomics and pluripotent stem cell research. The projects will combine the strengths of the center team members, each of whom is a leader in one or both fields. The program directors have significant prior experience managing large-scale federally-funded genomics research programs, and have published many high impact papers on human stem cell genomics. The lead investigators for the center-initiated projects are expert in genomics, hESC and iPSC derivation and differentiation, and bioinformatics. They will be joined by leaders in stem cell biology, cancer, epigenetics and computational systems analysis. Projects 1-3 will use multi-level genomics approaches to study stem cell derivation and differentiation in heart, tumors and the nervous system, with implications for understanding disease processes in cancer, diabetes, and cardiac and mental health. Project 4 will develop novel tools for computational systems and network analysis of stem cell genome function. A state-of-the-art data management program is also proposed. This research program will lead the way toward development of the safe use of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Finally, Center resources will be made available to researchers throughout the State of California through a peer-reviewed collaborative research program.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Our Center of Excellence for Stem Cell Genomics will help California maintain its position at the cutting edge of Stem Cell research and greatly benefit California in many ways. First, diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, neurological diseases, etc., pose a great financial burden to the State. Using advanced genomic technologies we will learn how stem cells change with growth and differentiation in culture and can best be handled for their safe use for therapy in humans. Second, through the collaborative research program, the center will provide genomics services to investigators throughout the State who are studying stem cells with a goal of understanding and treating specific diseases, thereby advancing treatments. Third, it will employ a large number of “high tech” individuals, thereby bringing high quality jobs to the state. Fourth, since many investigators in this center have experience in founding successful biotech companies it is likely to “spin off” new companies in this rapidly growing high tech field. Fifth, we believe that the iPS and information resources generated by this project will have significant value to science and industry and be valuable for the development of new therapies. Overall, the center activities will create a game-changing network effect for the state, propelling technology development, biological discovery and disease treatment in the field.

Metabolic regulation of cardiac differentiation and maturation

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-07356
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 124 834
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Cells in the body take up nutrients from their environment and metabolize them in a complex set of biochemical reactions to generate energy and replicate. Control of these processes is particularly important for heart cells, which need large amounts of energy to drive blood flow throughout the body. Not surprisingly, the nutritional requirements of heart cells are very different than those of stem cells. This proposal will investigate the metabolism of pluripotent stem cells and how this changes during differentiation to cardiac cells. We will determine which nutrients are important to make functional heart cells and use this information to optimize growth conditions for producing heart cells for regenerative medicine and basic biology applications. We accomplish this by feeding cells nutrients (sugar, fat) labeled with isotopes. As these labeled molecules are consumed, the isotopes are incorporated into different metabolites which we track using mass spectrometry. This advanced technique will allow us to see how sugars and fat are metabolized inside stem cells and cardiac cells obtained through differentiation. We will also study the electrical activity of these heart cells to ensure that adequate nutrients are provided for the generation of cells with optimal function. Ultimately, this project will lead to new methods for producing functional heart cells for regenerative medicine and may also lead to insights into how cardiac cells malfunction in heart disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in California. As a result, much of the regenerative medicine community in the state and the many Californians suffering from heart failure are interested in obtaining functional heart cells from stem cells. Our work will identify the most important nutrients required to coax stem cell-derived heart cells to behave like true adult heart cells. This information will make more effective cell models for researchers and companies to study how this disease affects heart cell metabolism. Since enzymes are highly targetable with drugs, the basic scientific findings from our work will be of great interest to California biotechnology companies and can stimulate job growth in the state. Our findings will also provide insight into very specific types of genetic heart disease, and this work may lead to additional grants from federal funding sources, bringing about additional revenue and job growth in California. A better understanding of how different nutrients influence heart cell function may provide guidance into new treatment strategies for heart disease. Finally, this work will highlight the importance of diet, nutrition, and healthy heart function, providing useful information relating to public health.

Improving Existing Drugs for Long QT Syndrome type 3 (LQT3) by hiPSC Disease-in-Dish Model

Funding Type: 
Early Translational IV
Grant Number: 
TR4-06857
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$6 361 618
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
This project uses patient hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to develop a safe and effective drug to treat a serious heart health condition. This research and product development will provide a novel method for a human genetic heart disorder characterized by long delay (long Q-T interval) between heart beats caused by mutations in the Na+ channel α subunit. Certain patients are genetically predisposed to a potentially fatal arrhythmogenic response to existing drugs to treat LQT3 since the drugs have off-target effects on other important ion channels in cardiomyocytes. We will use patient-derived hiPSC-cardiomyocytes to develop a safer drug (development candidate, DC) that will retain efficacy against the "leaky" Na+-channel yet minimize off-target effects in particular against the K+ hERG channel that can be responsible for the existing drug’s pro-arrhythmic effect. Since this problem is thought to occur severely in patients with the common KCHN2 variant, K897T (~33% of the white population), removing the off-target liability addresses a serious unmet clinical need. Futher, since we propose to modify an existing drug (i.e., do drug rescue), the path from patient-specific hiPSCs to clinic might be easier than for a completely new chemical entity. Lastly, an appealing aspect is that the hiPSCs were derived from a child to test his therapy, & we aim to produce a better drug for his treatment. Our goal is to complete development of the DC and initiate IND-enabling in vivo studies.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
In the US, an estimated 850,000 adults are hospitalized for arrhythmias each year, making arrhythmias one of the top five causes of healthcare expenditures in the US with a direct cost of more than $40 billion annually for diagnosis, treatment & rehabilitation. The State of California has approximately 12% of the US population which translates to 102,000 individuals hospitalized every year for arrhythmias. Another 30,000 Californians die of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome every year. Arrhythmias are very common in older adults and because the population of California is aging, research to address this issue is important for human health and the State economy. Most serious arrhythmias affect people older than 60. This is because older adults are more likely to have heart disease & other health problems that can lead to arrhythmias. Older adults also tend to be more sensitive to the side effects of medicines, some of which can cause arrhythmias. Some medicines used to treat arrhythmias can even cause arrhythmias as a side effect. In the US, atrial fibrillation (a common type of arrhythmia that can cause problems) affects millions of people & the number is rising. Accordingly, the same problem is present in California. Thus, successful completion of this work will not only provide citizens of California much needed advances in cardiovascular health technology & improvement in health care but an improved heart drug. This will provide high paying jobs & significant tax revenue.

The CIRM Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Biorepository – A Resource for Safe Storage and Distribution of High Quality iPSCs

Funding Type: 
hPSC Repository
Grant Number: 
IR1-06600
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$9 999 834
Disease Focus: 
Developmental Disorders
Heart Disease
Infectious Disease
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Autism
Respiratory Disorders
Vision Loss
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Critical to the long term success of the CIRM iPSC Initiative of generating and ensuring the availability of high quality disease-specific human IPSC lines is the establishment and successful operation of a biorepository with proven methods for quality control, safe storage and capabilities for worldwide distribution of high quality, highly-characterized iPSCs. Specifically the biorepository will be responsible for receipt, expansion, quality characterization, safe storage and distribution of human pluripotent stem cells generated by the CIRM stem cell initiative. This biobanking resource will ensure the availability of the highest quality hiPSC resources for researchers to use in disease modeling, target discovery and drug discovery and development for prevalent, genetically complex diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients and subsequently, the ability to differentiate these iPSCs into disease-relevant cell types holds great promise in facilitating the “disease-in-a-dish” approach for studying our understanding of the pathological mechanisms of human disease. iPSCs have already proven to be a useful model for several monogenic diseases such as Parkinson’s, Fragile X Syndrome, Schizophrenia, Spinal Muscular Atrophy, and inherited metabolic diseases such as 1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial hypercholesterolemia, and glycogen storage disease. In addition, the differentiated cells obtained from iPSCs represent a renewable, disease-relevant cell model for high-throughput drug screening and toxicology/safety assessment which will ultimately lead to the successful development of new therapeutic agents. iPSCs also hold great hope for advancing the use of live cells as therapies for correcting the physiological manifestations caused by disease or injury.

Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiovascular Progenitor Cells for Cardiac Cell Therapy.

Funding Type: 
New Faculty Physician Scientist
Grant Number: 
RN3-06455
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 179 315
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Despite therapeutic advances, cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in California. Regenerative therapies that restore normal function after a heart attack would have an enormous societal and financial impact. Although very promising, regenerative cardiac cell therapy faces a number of challenges and technological hurdles. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) allow the potential to deliver patient specific, well-defined cardiac progenitor cells (CPC) for regenerative clinical therapies. We propose to translate recent advances in our lab into the development of a novel, well-defined hiPSC-derived CPC therapy. All protocols will be based on clinical-grade, FDA-approvable, animal product-free methods to facilitate preclinical testing in a large animal model. This application will attempt to translate these findings by: -Developing techniques and protocols utilizing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac progenitor cells at yields adequate to conduct preclinical large animal studies. -Validation of therapeutic activity will be in small and large animal models of ischemic heart disease by demonstrating effectiveness of hiPSC-derived CPCs in regenerating damaged myocardium post myocardial infarction in small and large animal models. This developmental candidate and techniques described here, if shown to be a feasible alternative to current approaches, would offer a novel approach to the treatment of ischemic heart disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in California and the US costing the healthcare system greater than 300 billion dollars a year. Although current therapies slow progression of heart disease, there are few options to reverse or repair the damaged heart. The limited ability of the heart to regenerate following a heart attack results in loss of function and heart failure. Human clinical trials testing the efficacy of adult stem cell therapy to restore mechanical function after a heart attack, although promising, have had variable results with modest improvements. The discovery of human induced pluripotent stem cells offers a potentially unlimited renewable source for patient specific cardiac progenitor cells. However, practical application of pluripotent stem cells or their derivatives face a number of challenges and technological hurdles. We have demonstrated that cardiac progenitor cells, which are capable of differentiating into all cardiovascular cell types, are present during normal fetal development and can be isolated from human induced pluripotent stem cells. We propose to translate these findings into a large animal pre-clinical model and eventually to human clinical trials. This could lead to new therapies that would restore heart function after a heart attack preventing heart failure and death. This will have tremendous societal and financial benefits to patients in California and the US in treating heart failure.
Progress Report: 
  • Cardiovascular disease remains to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in California and the United States. Despite the best medical therapies, none address the issue of irreversible myocardial tissue loss after a heart attack and thus there has been a great interest to develop approaches to induce regeneration. Our lab has focused on harvesting the full potential of patient specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to use to attempt to regenerate the damaged tissue. We believe that these iPSCs can be potentially used in the future to generate sufficient number of cells to be implanted in the damaged heart to regenerate the lost tissue post heart attack. Our lab has studied how these cardiac progenitors evolve in the developing heart and applied our finding to iPSCs to recapitulate the cardiac progenitors to ultimately use in clinical therapies. We have successfully derived these cardiac progenitors from patient derived iPSCs in a clinical grade fashion to ensure that we can apply same protocols in the future to clinical use if we are successful in demonstrating the efficacy of this therapy in our translational large animal studies that we will be conducting.

Induction of Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Pacemaking Cells

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-05764
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 334 880
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Currently, over 350,000 patients per year with abnormal heart rhythm receive electronic pacemakers to restore their normal heart beat. Electronic pacemakers do not respond to the need for changing heart rate in situations such as exercise and have limited battery life, which can be resolved with biopacemakers. In this proposed project, we will examine methods that improve the generation of pacemaking cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells as candidates for biopacemaker.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This proposal aims to generate pacemaking cells through facilitated differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells that may serve as biopacemakers. Over 350,000 patients a year in the U.S. require the implantation of an electronic pacemaker to restore their heart rhythm, with more than 3 million patients that are dependent on this device. At the cost of $58K per pacemaker implantation, the healthcare burden is greater than $20 billion a year. However, the cost associated with these electronic devices does not end with surgery for implantation. These devices require a battery change every 5 to 10 years that involve another surgical procedure. With California being the most populated state, this can be very costly to the Californians. It also does not give the patients the quality of life by having to endure repeated surgeries. The possibility of biopacemaker that requires no future battery replacements and other advantages such as physiological adaptation to the active state of the patient make biopacemakers a truly desirable alternative to electronic devices. Moreover, one in 20,000 infants or preemies with congenital sinoatrial node dysfunction are also inappropriate candidates to receive electronic pacemakers because they are physically too small and require a proportional increase in the length of pacing leads with their significant growth rate. Therefore, there is a great need for biopacemakers that may overcome the deficiencies of electronic devices.
Progress Report: 
  • This goal of this project is to improve the yield of pacemaking cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) that can be used to engineer biopacemaker. We have demonstrated that manipulation of the membrane potential of hiPSCs using small molecules can upregulate genes of the desired cell type progressing to the pacemaking cells at all differentiation stages. In the differentiation stage to mesodermal cells, treated hiPSCs exhibit a membrane potential that is further down the differentiation path than untreated control. This source was this change was examined.

Epigenetic regulation of human cardiac differentiation

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-05901
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 708 560
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Each cell type in our body has its own identity. This identity allows a heart cell to contract repetitively, and a brain cell to conduct nerve impulses. Each cell type gains its identity by turning on or off thousands of genes that together give the cell its identity. Understanding how these sets of genes are regulated together as a cell gains its identity is important to be able to generate new cells in disease. For example, after a heart attack, heart muscle dies, leaving scar tissue and a poorly functioning heart. It would be very useful to be able to make new heart muscle by introducing the right set of instructions into other cells in the heart, and turn them into new heart muscle cells. One way that many genes are turned on or off together is by a cellular mechanism called epigenetic regulation. This global regulation coordinates thousands of genes. We plan to understand the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that give a human heart muscle cell its identity. Understanding their epigenetic blueprint of cardiac muscle cells will help develop strategies for cardiac regeneration, and for a deeper understanding of how cells in our body acquire their individual identities and function.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This research will benefit the state of California and its citizens by helping develop new approaches to cardiac regeneration that will be more efficient than current approaches, and amenable to drug-based approaches. In addition, the knowledge acquired in these studies will be important not only for heart disease, but for any other disease where reprogramming to regenerate new cells is desirable. The mechanisms revealed by this research will also lead to new understanding of the basis for congenital heart defects, which affect several thousand Californian children every year, and for which we understand very little.
Progress Report: 
  • We have made considerable progress on this project, which is aimed at understanding how genes are controlled during the conversion of human stem cells into heart cells. We have been able to use advanced techniques that allow us to make millions of human heart cells in a dish from "Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells" (known as iPS cells), which are cells derived from skin cells that have properties of embryonic stem cells. We are now using genome engineering techniques to insert a mutation that is associated with human congenital heart defects. We are now starting to map the chromatin marks that will tell us how heart genes are turned on, while genes belonging to other cell types are kept off. This "blueprint" of a heart cell will help us understand how to make better heart cells to repair injured hearts, and will allow us to model human congenital heart disease in a human experimental system.

Studying Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia with patient-specific iPS cells

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-06276
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 582 606
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Most heart conditions leading to sudden death or impaired pumping heart functions in the young people (<35 years old) are the results of genetic mutations inherited from parents. It is very difficult to find curative therapy for these inherited heart diseases due to late diagnosis and lack of understanding in how genetic mutations cause these diseases. Using versatile stem cells derived from patients’ skin cells with genetic mutations in cell-cell junctional proteins, we have made a significant breakthrough and successfully modeled one of these inherited heart diseases within a few months in cell cultures. These disease-specific stem cells can give rise to heart cells, which allow us to discover novel abnormalities in heart energy consumption that causes dysfunction and death of these diseased heart cells. Currently, there is no disease-slowing therapy to these inherited heart diseases except implanting a shocking device to prevent sudden death. We propose here to generate more patient-specific stem cell lines in a dish from skin cells of patients with similar clinical presentations but with different mutations. With these new patient-specific stem cell lines, we will be able to understand more about the malfunctioned networks and elucidate common disease-causing mechanisms as well as to develop better and safer therapies for treating these diseases. We will also test our new therapeutic agents in a mouse model for their efficacy and safety before applying to human patients.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Heart conditions leading to sudden death or impaired pumping functions in the young people (<35 years old) frequently are the results of genetic mutations inherited from parents. Currently, there is no disease-slowing therapy to these diseases. It is difficult to find curative therapy for these diseases due to late diagnosis. Many cell culture and animal models of human inherited heart diseases have been established but with significant limitation in their application to invent novel therapy for human patients. Recent progress in cellular reprogramming of skin cells to patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) enables modeling human genetic disorders in cell cultures. We have successfully modeled one of the inherited heart diseases within a few months in cell cultures using iPSCs derived from patients’ skin cells with genetic mutations in cell-cell junctional proteins. Heart cells derived from these disease-specific iPSCs enable us to discover novel disease-causing abnormalities and develop new therapeutic strategies. We plan to generate more iPSCs with the same disease to find common pathogenic pathways, identify new therapeutic strategies and conduct preclinical testing in a mouse model of this disease. Successful accomplishment of proposed research will make California the epicenter of heart disease modeling in vitro, which very likely will lead to human clinical trials and benefit its young citizens who have inherited heart diseases.
Progress Report: 
  • Most heart conditions leading to sudden death or impaired cardiac pumping functions in the young people (<35 years old) are the results of genetic mutations inherited from parents. It is very difficult to find curative therapy for these inherited heart diseases due to late diagnosis and lack of understanding in how genetic mutations cause these diseases. One of these inherited heart diseases is named arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C). The signature features of sick ARVD/C hearts are progressive heart muscle loss and their replacement by fat and scare tissues, which can lead to lethal irregular heart rhythms and/or heart failure. We have made a significant breakthrough and successfully modeled the sick ARVD/C heart muscles within two months in cell cultures using versatile stem cells derived from ARVD/C patients’ skin cells with genetic mutations in one of the desmosomal (a specific type of cell-cell junctions in hearts) proteins, named plakophilin-2. These disease-specific stem cells can give rise to heart cells, which allow us to discover specific abnormalities in heart energy consumption of ARVD/C heart muscles that causes dysfunction and death of these diseased heart cells. In the Year 1 of this grant support, we have made and characterized additional stem cells lines from ARVD/C patients with different desmosomal mutations. We are in the process to determine if heart muscles derived from these new ARVD/C patient-specific stem cells have common disease-causing mechanisms as we had published. We found two proposed therapeutic agents are ineffective in suppressing ARVD/C disease in culture but we have identified one potential drug that suppressed the loss of ARVD/C heart cells in culture. We also started to establish a known ARVD/C mouse model for future preclinical drug testing.

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