Heart Disease

Coding Dimension ID: 
295
Coding Dimension path name: 
Heart Disease

Preclinical evaluation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitors

Funding Type: 
New Faculty Physician Scientist
Grant Number: 
RN3-06378
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 930 388
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Because the regenerative capacity of adult heart is limited, any substantial cell loss as a result of a heart attack is mostly irreversible and may lead to progressive heart failure. Human pluripotent stem cells can be differentiated to heart cells, but their properties when transplanted into an injured heart remain unresolved. We propose to perform preclinical evaluation for transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac cells into the injured heart of an appropriate animal model. However, an important issue that has limited the progress to clinical use is their fate upon transplantation; that is whether they are capable of integrating into their new environment or they will function in isolation at their own pace. As an analogy, the performance of a symphony can go into chaos if one member plays in isolation from all surrounding cues. Therefore, it is important to determine if the transplanted cells can beat in harmony with the rest of the heart and if these cells will provide functional benefit to the injured heart. We plan to isolate cardiac cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells, transplant them into the model’s injured heart, determine if they result in improvement of the heart function, and perform detailed electrophysiology studies to determine their integration into the host tissue. The success of the proposed project will set the platform for future clinical trails of stem cell therapy for heart disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Heart disease remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the US with an estimated annual cost of over $300 billion. In California alone, more than 70,000 people die every year from cardiovascular diseases. Despite major advancement in treatments for patients with heart failure, which is mainly due to cellular loss upon myocardial injury, the mortality rate remains high. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) could provide an attractive therapeutic option to treat patients with damaged heart. We propose to isolate heart cells from hESCs and transplant them in an injured animal model's heart and study their fate. In the process, we will develop reagents that can be highly valuable for future research and clinical studies. The reagents generated in these studies can be patented forming an intellectual property portfolio shared by the state and the institution where the research is carried out. Most importantly, the research that is proposed in this application could lead to future stem cell-based therapies that would restore heart function after a heart attack. We expect that California hospitals and health care entities will be first in line for trials and therapies. Thus, California will benefit economically and it will help advance novel medical care.
Progress Report: 
  • Identification and isolation of pure cardiac cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells has proven to be a difficult task. We have designed a method to genetically engineer human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to harbor a label that is expressed during sequential maturation of cardiac cells. This will allow us to prospectively isolate cardiac cells at different stages of development for further characterization and transplantation. Using this method, we have screened proteins that are expressed on the surface of cells as markers. Using antibodies against these surface markers allows for isolation of these cells using cell sorting techniques. Thus far, we have identified two surface markers that can be used to isolate early cardiac progenitors. Using these markers, we have enriched for cardiac cells from differentiating hESCs and have characterized their properties in the dish as well as in small animals. We plan to transplant these cells in large animal models and monitor their survival, expansion and their integration into the host myocardium. Molecular imaging techniques are used to track these cells upon transplantation.

Derivation and analysis of pluripotent stem cell lines with inherited TGF-b mediated disorders from donated IVF embryos and reprogrammed adult skin fibroblasts

Funding Type: 
New Cell Lines
Grant Number: 
RL1-00662
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 424 412
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
The field of regenerative medicine revolves around the capacity of a subset of cells, called stem cells, to become the mature tissues of the adult human body. By studying stem cells, we hope to develop methods and reagents for treating disease. For instance, we hope to develop methods for making stem cells become cardiovascular cells in the lab which could then be used to rapidly screen large numbers drugs that may be used to treat cardiovascular disease. In another example, if we are able to create bone in the lab from stem cells, we may be able to help treat people with catastrophic skeletal injuries such as wounded soldiers. Until recently, the most flexible type of stem cell known was the embryonic stem cell. Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent, meaning they can give rise to all of the adult tissues. In contrast, stem cells found in the adult are considered only multipotent, in that they can only become a limited number of mature cells. For example, bone marrow stem cells can give rise to all of the components of the blood, but cannot make nerves for a spinal chord. Breakthroughs in the past couple of months have indicated that it is possible to "reprogram" adult skin cells and make them become pluripotent, like stem cells from an embryo. These new kind of cells ares called "induced pluripotent cells" or iPS cells for short. This has lead to great excitement within the scientific community because it raises the possibility that we may use this technology to rapidly create pluripotent stem cells from a large host of human diseases using skin from affected individuals. However, whether the new iPS cells made from skin cells and embryonic stem cells are functionally the same in all applications remains to be seen. Our lab is in the unique position to test this hypothesis. We have derived several normal embryonic stem cell lines and are in the process of deriving iPS cells from normal skin. Furthermore, we are fortunate enough to have begun deriving a new embryonic stem cell line harboring an inherited mutation that results in severe cardiovascular and bone disease that affects more than 7,500 Californians. What's more, one of our collaborators has over the past ten years assembled a cell bank of more that 50 unique adult skin cell lines with the same inherited disease. Therefore, for our proposal, we will make new normal and disease specific iPS and embryonic stem cell lines. We will use these new stem cell lines to test whether the iPS and embryonic stem cells are truly functionally the same, by comparing them after we make them become cardiovascular and bone cells. This work will allow us to advance the field of regenerative medicine on two fronts. 1. We will perform an important comparison of iPS and embryonic stem cell lines. 2. We will compare the disease specific cells with normal cells which will help us better understand cardiovascular and bone disease and pave the way for the development of new therapies.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Our proposal compares normal and disease specific pluripotent stem cells derived from embryonic and adult skin sources. This proposal will benefit the state of California and its citizens in several specific ways. First, the specific inherited disease we are studying affects approximately one in every 5,000 people worldwide. That translates into over 7,500 Californians and over 60,000 men, women and children of every race and ethnic group in the United States. By examining the characteristics of the disease specific lines, we hope to better understand the mechanisms of the disease and create assays for screening new drugs that can be used to treat people with the disease. Second, this disease is one of a broad class of cardiovascular disease, called thoracic aortic disease. An estimated 3,700 Californians are treated for thoracic aortic disease every year. Our findings may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying these diseases and other cardiovascular diseases. Third, this disease also results in skeletal defects. By studying the mechanisms of the skeletal defects, we will better understand the mechanisms of bone development, which will lead to improved applications of stem cell therapies for individuals with bone injury and disease. Finally, by providing detailed comparisons of iPS and embryonic stem cells, our work will have important ramifications for the future direction of the entire field of stem cell research and regenerative medicine.
Progress Report: 
  • During the past year, we have used the funds from this grant to derive a new embryonic stem cell line with an inherited mutation that results in a severe cardiovascular and bone disease called Marfan syndrome that affects more than 7,500 Californians. In addition, using adult skin cell lines with the same inherited disease, we have made significant progress deriving iPS cells with Marfan syndrome. During the next year we also hope to expand our studies by recruiting patients with a disease very similar to Marfan syndrome called Loeys-Dietz syndrome, to donate skin biopsies so that we can make iPS cells to study that disease as well. Using these new stem cell lines, we are testing whether the iPS and embryonic stem cells are truly functionally the same, by comparing them after we make them become cardiovascular and bone cells.
  • One of the biggest challenges in stem cell biology is figuring out how to make the stem cells become the adult cells we want to study and not some other random adult cells. Over the past year, we have made great strides in turning our stem cells into the cell types most severely affected in people with Marfan syndrome, namely bone and cardiovascular cells. What is most exciting to us is that even with these preliminary studies, it looks like we might be seeing differences between the stem cells with Marfan syndrome and normal stem cells after they are coaxed into become the bone and cardiovascular cells. These results are still very preliminary though, and we need to take great care during the next year to rigorously repeat our experiments before we can be certain of those results. If we can reproduce the differences, these differences may be the basis for screening for new drugs to treat people with Marfan syndrome or lead to a better understanding as to what exactly is the sequence of cellular events that leads to the patient’s symptoms. What’s more, by studying how to efficiently make bone and cardiovascular cells from human embryonic stem cells and iPS cells in the dish, we hope to provide important data that could be beneficial in a wide variety of applications such as tissue engineering or cellular replacement therapies using bone or blood vessels.
  • Marfan Syndrome (MFS) is a genetic disorder that affects more than 7,500 Californians. Patients develop severe complications, affecting several parts of the body (eyes, limbs, aorta). During the last two years, we have used the funds from this grant to develop new cell lines aimed at studying MFS in a dish. These cell lines, are called pluripotent stem cells, and have been generated from: (i) an embryo that was donated for research and was known to have inherited the MFS disease (these cell lines are named human embryonic stem cells (hESCs)); and (ii) from skin biopsies of adult patients (these cell lines are named induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)). These stem cell lines allow us to study MFS by differentiating the cells to adult cells (mainly bone and cardiovascular cells) and not other random adult cells. Using these new stem cell lines, we can test whether hESCs and iPSCs are functionally the same, by comparing them after we make them become cardiovascular and bone cells. We have observed that when the cells form bone or muscle cells, the stem cells with MFS are different and do not behave the same as those made with normal stem cells. We also started to use reagents that can force MFS cells to resemble and behave like normal bone cells. This is called “rescuing the disease phenotype”. For the first time, we are close to describing a stem cell-based technology not only to understand the mechanism(s) of the MFS but also to develop a screen for new drugs to treat people with MFS. However, we still need to confirm our results by repeating the experiments. Our results are very promising for understanding the bone issues in MFS, but continued efforts are also required to understand the cardiovascular issue. It is important to point out that the most important health risk associated with the disease is an aortic aneurysm that, if untreated, leads to death around 35 years old. In conclusion, we are continuing to generate data that will provide the foundation for improving our knowledge of the disease, and also will potentially assist us in developing new therapies for improving MFS patient lives.
  • The field of regenerative medicine revolves around the capacity of a subset of cells, called stem cells, to become the mature tissues of the adult human body. By studying stem cells, we hope to develop methods for treating a wide variety of diseases. For instance, we hope to develop methods for making stem cells become cardiovascular cells in the lab, which could then be used to rapidly screen large numbers of drugs that may be used to treat cardiovascular disease. We are also trying to create skeletal tissue from stem cells so that we may be able to help treat people with catastrophic skeletal injuries such as wounded soldiers.
  • Until recently, the most flexible type of stem cell known was the embryonic stem cell. Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent, meaning they can give rise to all cell types in the body. In contrast, stem cells found in the adult are considered only multipotent, in that they can only become a limited number of mature cells. Breakthroughs in the past five years have indicated that it is possible to "reprogram" adult skin cells and make them become pluripotent, like stem cells from an embryo. These new kinds of cells are called "induced pluripotent cells" or iPS cells. This has lead to great excitement within the scientific community because it raises the possibility that we may use this technology to rapidly create pluripotent stem cells from a large host of human diseases using easy to obtain tissue like skin and fat from affected individuals.
  • Our laboratory is in the unique position to test this hypothesis. We have derived several normal embryonic stem cell lines and iPS cells from normal skin. Furthermore, we have derived a new embryonic stem cell line and induced pluripotent stem cells from fibroblasts harboring an inherited mutation that results in severe cardiovascular and bone disease that affects more than 7,500 Californians, called Marfan's Syndrome.
  • We have created stem cells lines, both embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells from cells having this disease. We have compared these cells to normal embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells to examine exactly what makes these diseased cells behave in a way to have impaired bone formation. In addition, we have completed the differentiation, banking and full characterization of vascular cells derived from Marfan's Syndrome embryonic stem cells and Marfan’s syndrome induced pluripotent stem cells. We have seen that the cells with Marfan’s syndrome have a particular signaling pathway that has functional disregulation compared to normal, healthy cells. We have been able to explore how this disease process manipulates this pathway to cause this specific disease. Through this kind of modeling, we can use these cells to screen for treatment as well as model the disease in a way to manipulate the specific pathways this disease impacts to hopefully bring clinical treatments to patients who suffer from this disease.

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Cardiovascular Diagnostics

Funding Type: 
New Cell Lines
Grant Number: 
RL1-00639
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 708 560
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Toxicity
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Our objective is to use induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology to produce a cell-based test for long QT syndrome (LQTS), a major form of sudden cardiac death. Nearly 500,000 people in the US die of sudden cardiac death each year. LQTS can be triggered by drug exposure or stresses. Drug-induced LQTS is the single most common reason for drugs to be withdrawn from clinical trials, causing major setbacks to drug discovery efforts and exposing people to dangerous drugs. In most cases, the mechanism of drug-induced LQTS is unknown. However, there are genetic forms of LQTS that should allow us to make iPS cell–derived heart cells that have the key features of LQTS. Despite the critical need, current tests for drug-induced LQTS are far from perfect. As a result, potentially unsafe drugs enter clinical trials, endangering people and wasting millions of dollars in research funds. When drugs causing LQTS such as terfenadine (Seldane) enter the market, millions of people are put at serious risk. Unfortunately it is very difficult to know when a drug will cause LQTS, since most people who develop LQTS have no known genetic risk factors. The standard tests for LQTS use animal models or hamster cells that express human heart genes at high levels. Unfortunately, cardiac physiology in animal models (rabbits and dogs) differs from that in humans, and hamster cells lack many key features of human heart cells. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be differentiated into heart cells, but we do not know the culture conditions that would make the assay most similar to LQTS in a living person. These problems could be solved if we had a method to grow human heart cells from people with genetic LQTS mutations, so that we know the exact test conditions that would reflect the human disease. This test would be much more accurate than currently available tests and would help enable the development of safer human pharmaceuticals. Our long-term goal is to develop a panel of iPS cell lines that better represent the genetic diversity of the human population. Susceptibility to LQTS varies, and most people who have life-threatening LQTS have no known genetic risk factors. We will characterize iPS cells that have well-defined mutations that have clinically proven responses to drugs that cause LQTS. These iPS cell lines will be used to refine testing conditions. To validate the iPS cell–based test, the results will be directly compared to the responses in people. These studies will provide the foundation for an expanded panel of iPS cell lines from people with other genetic mutations and from people who have no genetically defined risk factor but still have potentially fatal drug-induced LQTS. This growing panel of iPS cell lines should allow for testing drugs for LQTS more effectively and accurately than any current test.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Heart disease is the leading killer of adults in the Western world. Nearly 500,000 people in the US die of sudden cardiac death each year. Our goal is to develop a cell-based test to screen for drugs that can cause sudden cardiac death. Drug-induced cardiac side effects are the most common reason for withdrawal of drugs from clinical trials, causing major setbacks to drug discovery efforts. Therefore our test we will improve the safety of pharmaceuticals. Our test will also reduce the change that a drug in development will fail during clinical trials, thereby decreasing the financial risk for pharmaceutical companies. The results of our studies will help develop new technology that is likely to contribute to the California biotechnology industry. Our studies will develop multiple lines of iPS cells with unique genetic characteristics. These cell lines could be valuable for biotechnology companies and researchers who are screening for drug compounds. We are working closely with California companies to develop new microscopes, assay devices, and analytical software that could be the basis for new product lines or new businesses. If therapies do come to fruition, we anticipate that California medical centers will be leading the way. The most important contribution of this study will be to improve the health of Californians. Heart disease is a major cause of mortality and morbidity, resulting in billions of dollars in health care costs and lost days at work. Our goal is to contribute research that would ultimately improve the quality of life and increase productivity for millions of people who suffer from heart disease.
Progress Report: 
  • Nearly 500,000 people in the US die of sudden cardiac death each year, and long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a major form of sudden cardiac death. LQTS can be triggered by drug exposure or stresses. Drug-induced LQTS is the single most common reason for drugs to be withdrawn from clinical trials, causing major setbacks to drug discovery efforts and exposing people to dangerous drugs. In most cases, the mechanism of drug-induced LQTS is unknown. However, there are genetic forms of LQTS that should allow us to make iPS cell–derived heart cells that have the key features of LQTS. Our objective is to produce a cell-based test for LQTS with induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology, which allows adult cells to be “reprogrammed” to be stem cell–like cells.
  • Despite the critical need, current tests for drug-induced LQTS are far from perfect. As a result, potentially unsafe drugs enter clinical trials, endangering people and wasting millions of dollars in research funds. When drugs that cause LQTS, such as terfenadine (Seldane), enter the market, millions of people are put at serious risk. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to know when a drug will cause LQTS, since most people who develop LQTS have no known genetic risk factors. The standard tests for LQTS use animal models or hamster cells that express human heart genes at high levels. Unfortunately, cardiac physiology in animal models (rabbits and dogs) differs from that in humans, and hamster cells lack many key features of human heart cells. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be differentiated into heart cells, but we do not know the culture conditions that would make the assay most similar to LQTS in a living person. These problems could be solved if we had a method to grow human heart cells from people with genetic LQTS mutations, so that we know the exact test conditions that would reflect the human disease. This test would be much more accurate than currently available tests and would help enable the development of safer human pharmaceuticals.
  • Our long-term goal is to develop a panel of iPS cell lines that better represent the genetic diversity of the human population. Susceptibility to LQTS varies, and most people who have life-threatening LQTS have no known genetic risk factors. We will characterize iPS cells with well-defined mutations that have clinically proven responses to drugs that cause LQTS. These iPS cell lines will be used to refine testing conditions. To validate the iPS cell–based test, the results will be directly compared to the responses in people. These studies will provide the foundation for an expanded panel of iPS cell lines from people with other genetic mutations and from people who have no genetically defined risk factor but still have potentially fatal drug-induced LQTS. This growing panel of iPS cell lines should allow for testing drugs for LQTS more effectively and accurately than any current test.
  • To meet these goals, we made a series of iPS cells that harbor different LQTS mutations. These iPS cells differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes. We are now evaluating these LQTS cell lines in cellular assays. We are hopeful that our studies will meet or exceed all the aims of our original proposal.
  • Nearly 500,000 people in the US die of sudden cardiac death each year, and long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a major form of sudden cardiac death. LQTS can be triggered by drug exposure or stresses. Drug-induced LQTS is the single most common reason for drugs to be withdrawn from clinical trials, causing major setbacks to drug discovery efforts and exposing people to dangerous drugs. In most cases, the mechanism of drug-induced LQTS is unknown. However, there are genetic forms of LQTS that should allow us to make iPS cell–derived heart cells that have the key features of LQTS. Our objective is to produce a cell-based test for LQTS with induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology, which allows adult cells to be “reprogrammed” to be stem cell–like cells.
  • Despite the critical need, current tests for drug-induced LQTS are far from perfect. As a result, potentially unsafe drugs enter clinical trials, endangering people and wasting millions of dollars in research funds. When drugs that cause LQTS, such as terfenadine (Seldane), enter the market, millions of people are put at serious risk. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to know when a drug will cause LQTS, since most people who develop LQTS have no known genetic risk factors. The standard tests for LQTS use animal models or hamster cells that express human heart genes at high levels. Unfortunately, cardiac physiology in animal models (rabbits and dogs) differs from that in humans, and hamster cells lack many key features of human heart cells. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be differentiated into heart cells, but we do not know the culture conditions that would make the assay most similar to LQTS in a living person. These problems could be solved if we had a method to grow human heart cells from people with genetic LQTS mutations, so that we know the exact test conditions that would reflect the human disease. This test would be much more accurate than currently available tests and would help enable the development of safer human pharmaceuticals.
  • Our long-term goal is to develop a panel of iPS cell lines that better represent the genetic diversity of the human population. Susceptibility to LQTS varies, and most people who have life-threatening LQTS have no known genetic risk factors. We will characterize iPS cells with well-defined mutations that have clinically proven responses to drugs that cause LQTS. These iPS cell lines will be used to refine testing conditions. To validate the iPS cell–based test, the results will be directly compared to the responses in people. These studies will provide the foundation for an expanded panel of iPS cell lines from people with other genetic mutations and from people who have no genetically defined risk factor but still have potentially fatal drug-induced LQTS. This growing panel of iPS cell lines should allow for testing drugs for LQTS more effectively and accurately than any current test.
  • To meet these goals, we have made a series of iPS cells that harbor different LQTS mutations. These iPS cells differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes. We are now evaluating these LQTS cell lines in cellular assays. We are hopeful that our studies will meet or exceed all the aims of our original proposal.
  • Cardiac arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Yet we lack appropriate human tissue models to develop new therapies of this deadly disease. Despite the importance of this disease, the current in vitro models utilize overexpressed channels in fibroblasts that do not accurately recapitulate human cardiac myocytes. With our CIRM funding, we greatly improved our in vitro models by using cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) from donors who harbor cardiac arrhythmia mutations. We enrolled a series of research subjects with genetic forms of LQTS. All participants in our study signed a consent form that was approved by the UCSF human subjects committee. We found that iPS cell–derived cardiomyocytes developed disease-related phenotypes in vitro that could be readily demonstrated by electrophysiological techniques. Such measurements enabled the pharmacological characterization of underlying mechanisms of disease and may point to potential novel therapies. The CIRM funding has allowed our laboratory develop new methods for human disease modeling in iPS cell–derived tissues. This project served as a critical catalyst for human disease research that would otherwise be impossible.

Chemical Genetic Approach to Production of hESC-derived Cardiomyocytes

Funding Type: 
Comprehensive Grant
Grant Number: 
RC1-00132
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 036 002
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Progress Report: 
  • The goal of this project is to identify small molecules that stimulate cardiomyocyte differentiation from stem cells. The strategy is to use embryonic stem ESC)-derived progenitors to screen for compounds and then optimize their chemical properties to generate molecules that can be used as reagents and potentially as lead compounds to develop drugs to stimulate regeneration in patient hearts. During year 2, progress is reported in: 1) optimizing the biological and pharmaceutical properties of 4 chemically diverse compounds discovered in year 1; 2) patent application filed on these compounds; 3) identification of targets and biological mechanism of action of 2 of the 4 compounds; 4) 1 compound has been validated in hESCs; 5) pilot screening completed of a new stem cell screen to discover molecules that act on late stage progenitors similar to cells thought to exist in the adult heart; 5) new assays developed and screened for discovering modulators of the Wnt pathway that enhance cardiomyocyte production. Thus, there are a total of 8 chemically distinct compounds under study and additional assays have been developed that should bring additional compounds into the pipeline during year 3.
  • This progress report covers FY3 of the project to identify and characterize novel small molecule probes of cardiomyocyte differentiation from stem cells. During FY3, we characterized 11 novel chemical entities that promote cardiomyocyte differentiation. The small, drug-like molecules affect distinct steps in cardiomyocyte differentiation – 5 compounds promote formation of uncommitted cardiac progenitors, 2 stimulated committed cardiac precursors, while 2 compounds act later to stimulate differentiation into cardiomyocytes. Thus, these compounds are novel probes of stem cell differentiation. Some of the compounds are characterized to act upon particular cellular target proteins while the targets of other compounds are unknown. Of the latter class, candidate targets have been characterized by biochemical studies; one of which has been confirmed by RNA interference, yielding a new pathway in cardiac cell formation from stem cells. Three of the chemical series have been described in a patent application. Additional primary hits are being characterized.
  • For FY4, we will continue characterization of a novel compounds. Particular focus will be on 4 chemical entities that promote later stages of human stem cell cardiomyocyte differentiation and on characterizing and discovering additional candidates that act on late-stage differentiation. In addition, we will develop a new pathway screen for a cellular target involved in specifying cardiomyocyte progenitors that have recently been shown to form new myocytes in vivo. Our new compounds are valuable probes of the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for making cardiac cells from stem cells. Moreover, recent data has shown that endogenous stem cells that reside in the adult heart resemble progenitors in the hESC cultures, so certain of our compounds can be considered as targeting cellular proteins and signaling pathways that might be beneficial to stimulate endogenous regeneration. Towards this goal, we will optimize the drug-like properties of the compounds in anticipation of in vivo testing for regenerative potential.
  • This research led to the discovery of small molecules that promote the formation of heart muscle cells from human pluripotent stem cells. The project used high throughput screening technology and medicinal chemistry, similar to that used in pharmaceutical companies, to discover and optimize the molecules. The cellular processes targeted by the compounds were also investigated, and in several cases this research uncovered novel roles for key cellular proteins and signaling pathways, such as Wnt and TGFb signaling, in stem cell differentiation. The compounds will be useful as reagents for cardiomyocyte preparation from stem cells, and patent applications have been filed.

Generation and characterization of high-quality, footprint-free human induced pluripotent stem cell lines from 3,000 donors to investigate multigenic diseases

Funding Type: 
hiPSC Derivation
Grant Number: 
ID1-06557
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$16 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Developmental Disorders
Genetic Disorder
Heart Disease
Infectious Disease
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Autism
Respiratory Disorders
Vision Loss
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the potential to differentiate to nearly any cells of the body, thereby providing a new paradigm for studying normal and aberrant biological networks in nearly all stages of development. Donor-specific iPSCs and differentiated cells made from them can be used for basic and applied research, for developing better disease models, and for regenerative medicine involving novel cell therapies and tissue engineering platforms. When iPSCs are derived from a disease-carrying donor; the iPSC-derived differentiated cells may show the same disease phenotype as the donor, producing a very valuable cell type as a disease model. To facilitate wider access to large numbers of iPSCs in order to develop cures for polygenic diseases, we will use a an episomal reprogramming system to produce 3 well-characterized iPSC lines from each of 3,000 selected donors. These donors may express traits related to Alzheimer’s disease, autism spectrum disorders, autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cerebral palsy, diabetes, or respiratory diseases. The footprint-free iPSCs will be derived from donor peripheral blood or skin biopsies. iPSCs made by this method have been thoroughly tested, routinely grown at large scale, and differentiated to produce cardiomyocytes, neurons, hepatocytes, and endothelial cells. The 9,000 iPSC lines developed in this proposal will be made widely available to stem cell researchers studying these often intractable diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer great promise to the large number of Californians suffering from often intractable polygenic diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, autism spectrum disorders, autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and respiratory disease. iPSCs can be generated from numerous adult tissues, including blood or skin, in 4–5 weeks and then differentiated to almost any desired terminal cell type. When iPSCs are derived from a disease-carrying donor, the iPSC-derived differentiated cells may show the same disease phenotype as the donor. In these cases, the cells will be useful for understanding disease biology and for screening drug candidates, and California researchers will benefit from access to a large, genetically diverse iPSC bank. The goal of this project is to reprogram 3,000 tissue samples from patients who have been diagnosed with various complex diseases and from healthy controls. These tissue samples will be used to generate fully characterized, high-quality iPSC lines that will be banked and made readily available to researchers for basic and clinical research. These efforts will ultimately lead to better medicines and/or cellular therapies to treat afflicted Californians. As iPSC research progresses to commercial development and clinical applications, more and more California patients will benefit and a substantial number of new jobs will be created in the state.

A new paradigm of lineage-specific reprogramming

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-06035
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 708 560
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Directly Reprogrammed Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Recently, we devised and reported a new regenerative medicine paradigm that entails temporal/transient overexpression of induced pluripotent stem cell based reprogramming factors in skin cells, leading to the rapid generation of “activated” cells, which can then be directed by specific growth factors and small molecules to “relax” back into various defined and homogenous tissue-specific precursor cell types (including nervous cells, heart cells, blood vessel cells, and pancreas and liver progenitor cells), which can be expanded and further differentiated into mature cells entirely distinct from fibroblasts. In this proposal, combined with small molecules that can functionally replace reprogramming transcription factors as well as substantially improve reprogramming efficiency and kinetics, we aim to further develop and mechanistically characterize chemically defined, non-integrating approaches (e.g., mRNA, miRNA, episomal plasmids and/or small molecule-based) to robustly and efficiently reprogram skin fibroblast cells into expandable heart precursor cells. Specifically, we will: determine if we can use non-integrating methods to destabilize human fibroblasts and facilitate their direct reprogramming into the heart precursor cells; characterize of heart cells generated by the direct programming methods, both in the tissue culture dish and in a mouse model of heart attack; and characterize newly identified reprogramming enhancing small molecules mechanistically.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This study will develop and mechanistically characterize a new method of generating safe patient specific heart cells that could be useful in treating heart failure which afflicts millions of Californians and accounts for billions of dollars in healthcare spending annually. Additionally, the small molecules discovered in this study could be good candidates for future drug development as well as being broadly useful for other regenerative medicine applications. These advances could also be a platform for new personalized medicine/ cell banking businesses which could bring economic growth in addition to improving the health of Californians.
Progress Report: 
  • During the reporting period, we have made very significant progress toward the following research aims: (1) Using the Oct4-based reprogramming assay system established, we were able to screen for and identify small molecules that can replace the other three genes in the Cell-Activation and Signaling-Directed (CASD) lineage conversion paradigm for reprogramming fibroblasts into cardiac lineage. (2) Using in-depth assays, we have examined the process using lineage-tracing methods and characterized those Oct4/small molecules-reprogrammed cardiac cells in vitro. (3) Most importantly, we were able to identify a baseline condition that appears to reprogram human fibroblasts into cardiac cells using defined conditions.

Center of Excellence for Stem Cell Genomics

Funding Type: 
Genomics Centers of Excellence Awards (R)
Grant Number: 
GC1R-06673-A
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$40 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Brain Cancer
Cancer
Developmental Disorders
Heart Disease
Cancer
Genetic Disorder
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
Adult Stem Cell
Cancer Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
Public Abstract: 
The Center of Excellence in Stem Cell Genomics will bring together investigators from seven major California research institutions to bridge two fields – genomics and pluripotent stem cell research. The projects will combine the strengths of the center team members, each of whom is a leader in one or both fields. The program directors have significant prior experience managing large-scale federally-funded genomics research programs, and have published many high impact papers on human stem cell genomics. The lead investigators for the center-initiated projects are expert in genomics, hESC and iPSC derivation and differentiation, and bioinformatics. They will be joined by leaders in stem cell biology, cancer, epigenetics and computational systems analysis. Projects 1-3 will use multi-level genomics approaches to study stem cell derivation and differentiation in heart, tumors and the nervous system, with implications for understanding disease processes in cancer, diabetes, and cardiac and mental health. Project 4 will develop novel tools for computational systems and network analysis of stem cell genome function. A state-of-the-art data management program is also proposed. This research program will lead the way toward development of the safe use of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Finally, Center resources will be made available to researchers throughout the State of California through a peer-reviewed collaborative research program.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Our Center of Excellence for Stem Cell Genomics will help California maintain its position at the cutting edge of Stem Cell research and greatly benefit California in many ways. First, diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, neurological diseases, etc., pose a great financial burden to the State. Using advanced genomic technologies we will learn how stem cells change with growth and differentiation in culture and can best be handled for their safe use for therapy in humans. Second, through the collaborative research program, the center will provide genomics services to investigators throughout the State who are studying stem cells with a goal of understanding and treating specific diseases, thereby advancing treatments. Third, it will employ a large number of “high tech” individuals, thereby bringing high quality jobs to the state. Fourth, since many investigators in this center have experience in founding successful biotech companies it is likely to “spin off” new companies in this rapidly growing high tech field. Fifth, we believe that the iPS and information resources generated by this project will have significant value to science and industry and be valuable for the development of new therapies. Overall, the center activities will create a game-changing network effect for the state, propelling technology development, biological discovery and disease treatment in the field.

Metabolic regulation of cardiac differentiation and maturation

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-07356
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 124 834
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Cells in the body take up nutrients from their environment and metabolize them in a complex set of biochemical reactions to generate energy and replicate. Control of these processes is particularly important for heart cells, which need large amounts of energy to drive blood flow throughout the body. Not surprisingly, the nutritional requirements of heart cells are very different than those of stem cells. This proposal will investigate the metabolism of pluripotent stem cells and how this changes during differentiation to cardiac cells. We will determine which nutrients are important to make functional heart cells and use this information to optimize growth conditions for producing heart cells for regenerative medicine and basic biology applications. We accomplish this by feeding cells nutrients (sugar, fat) labeled with isotopes. As these labeled molecules are consumed, the isotopes are incorporated into different metabolites which we track using mass spectrometry. This advanced technique will allow us to see how sugars and fat are metabolized inside stem cells and cardiac cells obtained through differentiation. We will also study the electrical activity of these heart cells to ensure that adequate nutrients are provided for the generation of cells with optimal function. Ultimately, this project will lead to new methods for producing functional heart cells for regenerative medicine and may also lead to insights into how cardiac cells malfunction in heart disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in California. As a result, much of the regenerative medicine community in the state and the many Californians suffering from heart failure are interested in obtaining functional heart cells from stem cells. Our work will identify the most important nutrients required to coax stem cell-derived heart cells to behave like true adult heart cells. This information will make more effective cell models for researchers and companies to study how this disease affects heart cell metabolism. Since enzymes are highly targetable with drugs, the basic scientific findings from our work will be of great interest to California biotechnology companies and can stimulate job growth in the state. Our findings will also provide insight into very specific types of genetic heart disease, and this work may lead to additional grants from federal funding sources, bringing about additional revenue and job growth in California. A better understanding of how different nutrients influence heart cell function may provide guidance into new treatment strategies for heart disease. Finally, this work will highlight the importance of diet, nutrition, and healthy heart function, providing useful information relating to public health.

Improving Existing Drugs for Long QT Syndrome type 3 (LQT3) by hiPSC Disease-in-Dish Model

Funding Type: 
Early Translational IV
Grant Number: 
TR4-06857
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$6 361 618
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
This project uses patient hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to develop a safe and effective drug to treat a serious heart health condition. This research and product development will provide a novel method for a human genetic heart disorder characterized by long delay (long Q-T interval) between heart beats caused by mutations in the Na+ channel α subunit. Certain patients are genetically predisposed to a potentially fatal arrhythmogenic response to existing drugs to treat LQT3 since the drugs have off-target effects on other important ion channels in cardiomyocytes. We will use patient-derived hiPSC-cardiomyocytes to develop a safer drug (development candidate, DC) that will retain efficacy against the "leaky" Na+-channel yet minimize off-target effects in particular against the K+ hERG channel that can be responsible for the existing drug’s pro-arrhythmic effect. Since this problem is thought to occur severely in patients with the common KCHN2 variant, K897T (~33% of the white population), removing the off-target liability addresses a serious unmet clinical need. Futher, since we propose to modify an existing drug (i.e., do drug rescue), the path from patient-specific hiPSCs to clinic might be easier than for a completely new chemical entity. Lastly, an appealing aspect is that the hiPSCs were derived from a child to test his therapy, & we aim to produce a better drug for his treatment. Our goal is to complete development of the DC and initiate IND-enabling in vivo studies.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
In the US, an estimated 850,000 adults are hospitalized for arrhythmias each year, making arrhythmias one of the top five causes of healthcare expenditures in the US with a direct cost of more than $40 billion annually for diagnosis, treatment & rehabilitation. The State of California has approximately 12% of the US population which translates to 102,000 individuals hospitalized every year for arrhythmias. Another 30,000 Californians die of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome every year. Arrhythmias are very common in older adults and because the population of California is aging, research to address this issue is important for human health and the State economy. Most serious arrhythmias affect people older than 60. This is because older adults are more likely to have heart disease & other health problems that can lead to arrhythmias. Older adults also tend to be more sensitive to the side effects of medicines, some of which can cause arrhythmias. Some medicines used to treat arrhythmias can even cause arrhythmias as a side effect. In the US, atrial fibrillation (a common type of arrhythmia that can cause problems) affects millions of people & the number is rising. Accordingly, the same problem is present in California. Thus, successful completion of this work will not only provide citizens of California much needed advances in cardiovascular health technology & improvement in health care but an improved heart drug. This will provide high paying jobs & significant tax revenue.

The CIRM Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Biorepository – A Resource for Safe Storage and Distribution of High Quality iPSCs

Funding Type: 
hPSC Repository
Grant Number: 
IR1-06600
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$9 999 834
Disease Focus: 
Developmental Disorders
Heart Disease
Infectious Disease
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Autism
Respiratory Disorders
Vision Loss
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Critical to the long term success of the CIRM iPSC Initiative of generating and ensuring the availability of high quality disease-specific human IPSC lines is the establishment and successful operation of a biorepository with proven methods for quality control, safe storage and capabilities for worldwide distribution of high quality, highly-characterized iPSCs. Specifically the biorepository will be responsible for receipt, expansion, quality characterization, safe storage and distribution of human pluripotent stem cells generated by the CIRM stem cell initiative. This biobanking resource will ensure the availability of the highest quality hiPSC resources for researchers to use in disease modeling, target discovery and drug discovery and development for prevalent, genetically complex diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients and subsequently, the ability to differentiate these iPSCs into disease-relevant cell types holds great promise in facilitating the “disease-in-a-dish” approach for studying our understanding of the pathological mechanisms of human disease. iPSCs have already proven to be a useful model for several monogenic diseases such as Parkinson’s, Fragile X Syndrome, Schizophrenia, Spinal Muscular Atrophy, and inherited metabolic diseases such as 1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial hypercholesterolemia, and glycogen storage disease. In addition, the differentiated cells obtained from iPSCs represent a renewable, disease-relevant cell model for high-throughput drug screening and toxicology/safety assessment which will ultimately lead to the successful development of new therapeutic agents. iPSCs also hold great hope for advancing the use of live cells as therapies for correcting the physiological manifestations caused by disease or injury.

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