aging

On stem cells, sports injuries and aging

A headline today grabbed my attention: Can your own stem cells heal your running injuries?

The answer, in a word: Duh.

Disease in a dish model provides insight on aging

Normal aging takes many decades to create major changes in our cells, so it is very difficult to study. As a result, very little is known about this fundamental inevitability of life. But that may change with the help of an unfortunate child, who by the bad luck of a single point mutation developed a rare disease that results in aging at eight to 10 times the normal pace.

Longevity gene regulates neural stem cells in mice

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that a gene long-known to regulate the lifespan of tiny roundworms also plays a role in regulating neural stem cells in mice.

Variations of the gene family, called FoxO, help roundworms live to an unusually ripe old age in the lab, and mutations in the FoxO3 gene have also recently been associated with long life in Japanese, German, American and Italian populations. Laboratory mice lacking FoxO3 live to about half their usual age of 30 months before dying of cancer.

Old muscle stem cells experimentally returned to youth

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have found molecular pathways that human muscle stem cells rely on to repair damaged muscle. These pathways are active in younger people but less active in older people, explaining why muscles repair more slowly with age. The group found that younger volunteers had double the number of regenerative muscle stem cells in their thigh muscles compared to older volunteers. After two weeks in a leg cast, both groups began exercise routines to rebuild muscle.

Aging Muscles Inhibit Stem Cells, Prevent Repair

Researchers at UC, Berkeley identified a signaling molecule that interferes with the ability of older skeletal muscle to regenerate. After injury, adult skeletal muscle regenerates by activating muscle stem cells that fuse with the existing muscle cells to repair the damage. This ability to regenerate diminishes with age, not because of a decline in the number of resident stem cells, but because stem cells in the older muscle don't respond when damage occurs. It turns out that older muscles release molecules that actively inhibit the resident stem cells.

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© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine