Neurological Disorders

Coding Dimension ID: 
303
Coding Dimension path name: 
Neurological Disorders
Grant Type: 
Early Translational I
Grant Number: 
TR1-01257
Investigator: 
Name: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 753 559
Disease Focus: 
Huntington's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Human Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 

One in every ten thousand people in the USA have Huntington's Disease, and it impacts many more. Multiple generations within a family can inherit the disease, resulting in escalating health care costs and draining family resources. This highly devastating and fatal disease touches all races and socioeconomic levels, and there are currently no cures. Screening for the mutant HD gene is available, but the at-risk children of an affected parent often do not wish to be tested since there are currently no early prevention strategies or effective treatments.

HD is a challenging disease to treat. Not only do the affected, dying neurons need to be salvaged or replaced, but also the levels of the toxic mutant protein must be diminished to prevent further neural damage and to halt progression of the movement disorders and physical and mental decline that is associated with HD.

Our application is focused on developing a safe and effective therapeutic strategy to reduce levels of the harmful mutant protein in damaged or at-risk neurons. We are using an RNA interference strategy – “small interfering RNA (siRNA)” to prevent the mutant protein from being produced in the cell. This strategy has been shown to be highly effective in animal models of HD. However, the inability to deliver the therapeutic molecules into the human brain in a robust and durable manner has thwarted scale-up of this potentially curative therapy into human trials. We are using mesenchymal stem cells, the “paramedics of the body”, to deliver the therapeutic siRNA directly into damaged cells. We have discovered that these stem cells are remarkably effective delivery vehicles, moving robustly through the tissue and infusing therapeutic molecules into each damaged cell that they contact. Thus we are utilizing nature's own paramedic system, but we are arming them with a new tool to also reduce mutant protein levels. Our novel system will allow the therapy to be carefully tested in preparation for future human cellular therapy trials for HD.

The significance of our studies is very high because there are currently no treatments to diminish the amount of toxic mutant htt protein in the neurons of patients affected by Huntington’s Disease. There are no cures or successful clinical trials for HD. Our therapeutic strategy is initially examining models to treat HD, since the need is so acute. But this biological delivery system could also be used, in the future, for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1), Alzheimer's Disease, and some forms of Parkinson's Disease, where reduction of the levels of a mutant or disease-activating protein could be curative.

Development of this novel stem cell therapeutic and effective siRNA delivery system is extremely important for the community of HD and neurodegenerative disease researchers, patients, and families.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

It is estimated that one in 10,000 CA residents have Huntington’s Disease (HD). While the financial burden of Huntington’s Disease is estimated to be in the billions, the emotional burden on the friends and families of HD patients is immeasurable. Health care costs are extremely high for HD patients due to the decline in both body and mind. The lost ability of HD patients to remain in the CA workforce and to support their families causes additional financial strain on the state’s economy. HD is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, which means that 50% of the children of an HD patient will inherit the disease and will in turn pass it on to 50% of their children. Individuals diagnosed through genetic testing are at risk of losing insurance coverage. Since there are currently no cures or successful clinical trials for HD, many are reluctant to be tested. The proposed project is designed in an effort to reach out to these individuals who, given that HD is given an orphan disease designation, may feel that they are completely forgotten and thus have little or no hope for their future or that of their families.

To combat this devastating disease, we are using an RNA interference strategy, “small interfering RNA (siRNA),” to prevent the mutant htt protein from being produced in the cell. This strategy has been shown to be highly effective in animal models of HD. However the siRNA needs to be delivered to the brain or central nervous system in a continual manner, to destroy the toxic gene products as they are produced. There are currently no methods to infuse or produce siRNA in the brain, in a safe and sustained manner. Therefore the practical clinical use of this dramatically effective potential therapeutic application is currently thwarted.

Here we propose a solution, using adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) modified to infuse siRNA directly into diseased or at-risk neurons in the striata of HD patients, to decrease the levels of the toxic mutant htt protein. MSC are known as the “paramedics of the body" and have been demonstrated through clinical trials to be safe and to have curative effects on damaged tissue. Even without the modification to reduce the mutant protein levels, the infused MSC will help repair the damaged brain tissue by promoting endogenous neuronal growth through secreted growth factors, secreting anti-apoptotic factors, and regulating inflammation.

Our therapeutic strategy will initially examine models to treat HD, since the need is so acute. But our biological delivery system could also be applied to other neurodegenerative disorders such as ALS, some forms of Parkinson’s Disease, and Alzheimer’s Disease, by using siRNA to interfere with key pathways in development of the pathology. This would be the first cellular therapy for HD patients and would have a major impact on those affected in California. In addition, the methods that we are developing will have far-reaching effects for other neurodegenerative disorders.

Grant Type: 
Early Translational I
Grant Number: 
TR1-01246
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
Type: 
Partner-PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 701 766
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Parkinson's Disease
Collaborative Funder: 
Germany
Human Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 

The goals of this study are to develop patient-specific induced pluripotent cell lines (iPSCs) from patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) with defined mutations and sporadic forms of the disease. Recent groundbreaking discoveries allow us now to use adult human skin cells, transduce them with specific genes, and generate cells that exhibit characteristics of embryonic stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). These lines will be used as an experimental pre-clinical model to study disease mechanisms unique to PD. We predict that these cells will not only serve an ‘authentic’ model for PD when further differentiated into the specific dopaminergic neurons, but that these cells are pathologically affected with PD.

The specific objectives of these studies are to (1) establish a bank of iPSCs from patients with idiopathic PD and patients with defined mutations in genes associated with PD, (2) differentiate iPSCs into dopaminergic neurons and assess neurochemical and neuropathological characteristics of PD of these cells in vitro, and (3) test the hypothesis that specific pharmacologic agents can be used to block or reverse pathological phenotypes.

The absence of cellular models of Parkinson’s disease represents a major bottleneck in the scientific field of PD, which, if solved in this collaborative effort, would be instantly translated into a wide range of clinical applications, including drug discovery. This research is highly translational, as the final component is aimed at testing lead compounds that could be neuroprotective, and ultimately at developing a high-throughput drug screening program to discover new disease modifying compounds. This is an essential avenue if we want to offer our patients a new therapeutic approach that can give them a near normal life after being diagnosed with this progressively disabling disease.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Approx. 36,000-60,000 people in the State of California are affected with Parkinson’s disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disease that causes a high degree of disability and financial burden for our health care system. It is estimated that the number of PD cases will double by the year 2030. We have a critical need for novel therapies that will prevent or even reverse neuronal cell loss of specific neurons in the brain of patients.

This collaborative proposal will provide real benefits and values to the state of California and its citizens in providing new approaches for understanding disease mechanisms, diagnostic tools and drug discovery of novel treatment for PD. Reprogramming of adult skin cells to a pluripotent state is the underlying mechanism upon which this application is built upon and offers an attractive avenue of research in this case to develop an ‘authentic’ pre-clinical model of PD.

The rationale for the proposed research is that differentiated pluripotent stem cells from patients with known genetic forms of PD will recapitulate in vitro one or more of the key molecular aspects of neural degeneration associated with PD and thus provide an entirely novel human cellular system for investigation PD-related disease pathways and for drug discovery.

The impact of this collaborative research project, if successful, is difficult to over-estimate. The scientific field has been struggling with the inability to directly access cells that are affected by the disease process that underlies PD and therefore all research and drug discovery has relied on ”best guess” models of the disease. Thus, the absence of cellular models of Parkinson’s disease represents a huge bottleneck in the field.

Grant Type: 
Transplantation Immunology
Grant Number: 
RM1-01720
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 387 800
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Spinal Cord Injury
Human Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 

Previous clinical studies have shown that grafting of human fetal brain tissue into the CNS of adult recipients can be associated with long-term (more then 10 years) graft survival even after immunosuppression is terminated. These clinical data represent in part the scientific base for the CNS to be designated as an immune privilege site, i.e., immune response toward grafted cells is much less pronounced. With rapidly advancing cell sorting technologies which permit effective isolation and expansion of neuronal precursors from human embryonic stem cells, these cells are becoming an attractive source for cell replacement therapies. Accordingly, there is great need to develop drug therapies or other therapeutic manipulations which would permit an effective engraftment of such derived cells with only transient or no immunosuppression. Accordingly, the primary goal in our studies is to test engraftment of 3 different neuronal precursors cell lines of human origin once grafted into spinal cord in transiently immunosuppressed minipigs. In addition, because the degree of cell engraftment can differ if cells are grafted into injured CNS tissue, the survival of cells once grafted into previously injured spinal cord will also be tested. Second, we will test the engraftment of neuronal cells generated from pig skin cells (fibroblasts) after genetic reprogramming (i.e., inducible pluripotent stem cells, iPS). Because these cells will be transplanted back to the fibroblast donor, we expect stable and effective engraftment in the absence of immunosuppression. Jointly by testing the above technologies (transient immunosuppression and iPS-derived neural precursors), our goal is to define the optimal neuronal precursor cell line(s) as well as immunosuppressive (or no) treatment which will lead to stable and permanent engraftment of spinally transplanted cells.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Brain or spinal cord neurodegenerative disorders, including stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis or spinal trauma, affect many Californians. In the absence of a functionally effective cure, the cost of caring for patients with such diseases is high, in addition to a major personal and family impact. Our major goal is to develop therapeutic manipulations which are well tolerated by patients and which will lead to stable survival of previously spinal cord-grafted cells generated from human embryonic stem cells. If successful, this advance can serve as a guidance tool for CNS cell replacement therapies in general as it will define the optimal immune tolerance-inducing protocols. In addition, the development of this type of therapeutic approach (pharmacological or cell-replacement based) in California will serve as an important proof of principle and stimulate the formation of businesses that seek to develop these types of therapies (providing banks of inducible pluripotent stem cells) in California with consequent economic benefit.

Grant Type: 
Transplantation Immunology
Grant Number: 
RM1-01735-A
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 472 634
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Human Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 

One of the key issues in stem cell transplant biology is solving the problem of transplant rejection. Despite over three decades of research in human embryonic stem cells, little is known about the factors governing immune system tolerance to grafts derived from these cells. In order for the promise of embryonic stem cell transplantation for treatment of diseases to be realized, focused efforts must be made to overcome this formidable hurdle.
Our proposal will directly address this critically important issue by investigating the importance of matching immune system components known as human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Because mouse and human immune systems are fundamentally different, we will establish cutting-edge mouse models that have human immune systems as suitable hosts within which to conduct our stem cell brain transplant experiments. Such models rely on immunocompromised mice as recipients for human blood-derived stem cells. These mice go on to develop a human immune system, complete with HLAs, and can subsequently be used to engraft embryonic stem cell-derived brain cells that are either HLA matched or mismatched.
Due to our collective expertise in the central nervous system and animal transplantation studies for Parkinson’s disease, our specific focus will be on transplanting embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem cells into brains of both healthy and Parkinson's diseased mice. We will then detect: 1) abundance of brain immune cell infiltrates, 2) production of immune molecules, and 3) numbers of brain-engrafted embryonic stem cells. Establishing this important system would allow for a predictive model of human stem cell transplant rejection based on immune system matching. We would then know how similar HLAs need to be in order to allow for acceptance stem cell grafts.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

In this project, we propose to focus on the role of the human immune system in human embryonic stem cell transplant rejection. Specifically, we aim to develop cutting-edge experimental mouse models that possess human immune systems. This will allow us to determine whether immune system match versus mismatch enables embryonic stem cell brain transplant acceptance versus rejection. Further, we will explore this key problem in stem cell transplant biology both in the context of the healthy and diseased brain. Regarding neurological disease, we will focus on neural stem cell transplants for Parkinson's disease, which is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, second only to Alzheimer's disease. If successful, our work will pave the way toward embryonic stem cell-based treatment for this devastating neurological disorder for Californians and others.
In order to accomplish these goals, we will utilize two of the most common embryonic stem cell types, known as WiCell H1 and WiCell H9 cells. It should be noted that these particular stem cells will likely not be reauthorized for funding by the federal government due to ethical considerations. This makes our research even more important to the State of California, which would not only benefit from our work but is also in a unique position to offer funding outside of the federal government to continue studies such as these on these two important types of human embryonic stem cells.

Grant Type: 
Transplantation Immunology
Grant Number: 
RM1-01735-B
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 472 634
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Human Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

One of the key issues in stem cell transplant biology is solving the problem of transplant rejection. Despite over three decades of research in human embryonic stem cells, little is known about the factors governing immune system tolerance to grafts derived from these cells. In order for the promise of embryonic stem cell transplantation for treatment of diseases to be realized, focused efforts must be made to overcome this formidable hurdle.
Our proposal will directly address this critically important issue by investigating the importance of matching immune system components known as human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Because mouse and human immune systems are fundamentally different, we will establish cutting-edge mouse models that have human immune systems as suitable hosts within which to conduct our stem cell brain transplant experiments. Such models rely on immunocompromised mice as recipients for human blood-derived stem cells. These mice go on to develop a human immune system, complete with HLAs, and can subsequently be used to engraft embryonic stem cell-derived brain cells that are either HLA matched or mismatched.
Due to our collective expertise in the central nervous system and animal transplantation studies for Parkinson’s disease, our specific focus will be on transplanting embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem cells into brains of both healthy and Parkinson's diseased mice. We will then detect: 1) abundance of brain immune cell infiltrates, 2) production of immune molecules, and 3) numbers of brain-engrafted embryonic stem cells. Establishing this important system would allow for a predictive model of human stem cell transplant rejection based on immune system matching. We would then know how similar HLAs need to be in order to allow for acceptance stem cell grafts.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

In this project, we propose to focus on the role of the human immune system in human embryonic stem cell transplant rejection. Specifically, we aim to develop cutting-edge experimental mouse models that possess human immune systems. This will allow us to determine whether immune system match versus mismatch enables embryonic stem cell brain transplant acceptance versus rejection. Further, we will explore this key problem in stem cell transplant biology both in the context of the healthy and diseased brain. Regarding neurological disease, we will focus on neural stem cell transplants for Parkinson's disease, which is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, second only to Alzheimer's disease. If successful, our work will pave the way toward embryonic stem cell-based treatment for this devastating neurological disorder for Californians and others.
In order to accomplish these goals, we will utilize two of the most common embryonic stem cell types, known as WiCell H1 and WiCell H9 cells. It should be noted that these particular stem cells will likely not be reauthorized for funding by the federal government due to ethical considerations. This makes our research even more important to the State of California, which would not only benefit from our work but is also in a unique position to offer funding outside of the federal government to continue studies such as these on these two important types of human embryonic stem cells.

Grant Type: 
Tools and Technologies I
Grant Number: 
RT1-01107
Investigator: 
Name: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$869 262
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Human Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 

The ability to target a specific locus in the mouse genome and to alter it in a specific fashion has fundamentally changed experimental design and made mice the preeminent model for studying human diseases . However, pathogenesis in humans have unique pathways that may not be revealed by only using mouse or other animal models. An approach that combines the advantages of mouse models with parallel experiments in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) offers significant advantages over current methodologies. With the large number of hESC lines available, the ability to grow cells in defined media, the development of drug resistant feeders and the reports of strategies to insert DNA with increasing efficiency into hESC, it would only be a matter of time to obtain homologous recombinants in hESCs.

In order to provide direct clues to pathogenesis in human tissues, we propose to use homologous recombination to establish in vitro human disease models in hESCs. As a proof of principle, we have chosen Lou Gehrig's disease (or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS). ALS is a disease that progressively and selectively attacks motoneurons in the brain and the spinal cord. It becomes fatal when motoneurons controlling breathing are affected. Approximately 2% of ALS cases have been identified to be caused by mutations of the the Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene in an autosomal dominant trait. Animal models have been established and researchers have been able to propose disease mechanisms which led to potential treatments, although no cure has been offered yet. This in part might be due to lack of human cell based models and varied mutant copy numbers in transgenic animals as well as the random nature of their integration into the genome.

Here, we propose to generate hESC lines by gene targeting to harbor point mutations in the SOD1 gene, which recapitulates the genetic defects in SOD1 mutated ALS patients. We will further target these mutations in hESC reporter lines of the two important cell types in ALS: motoneurons and astrocytes. The availability of these SOD1 mutated hESC and hESC reporter lines will allow researchers to obtain purified “diseased” motoneurons and astrocytes, which will facilitate the dissection of ALS pathogenesis. The completion of this proposal will provide (1) a highly efficient protocol for performing homologous recombination in hESCs, (2) a package of motoneuron and astrocyte reporters which are useful for both disease and developmental studies along the neural lineages, and (3) a set of ALS disease platforms of hESC lines to serve as an hESC ALS disease in vitro model, as well as a virtually unlimited source of “diseased” motoneurons and astrocytes. This work not only will provide tools to move pathogenesis research for ALS, but also can be reliably extended into other neural and non-neural lineage diseases, of which genetic defects have been identified, including Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD).

Statement of Benefit to California: 

The overall objectives for this proposal are to create in vitro human neurodegenerative disease models using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and as a proof of principle, three point mutations of the SOD1 gene which cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) will be tested first. These SOD1 missense mutations, G37R, G85R and G93A, have been identified in FALS patients and widely used in rodent models of FALS. We propose to create SOD1 mutations in hESC lines by gene targeting technology which has been proven to be revolutionary in establishing disease models in animals. In addition, we will use similar protocol to generate motoneuron and astrocyte reporter lines in hESCs, since these two cell types and the interaction between them play the most critical roles in the pathogenesis of ALS. After obtaining the three SOD1 missense mutants in motoneuron and astrocyte reporter lines, we will extend our efforts to characterization of these lines, by examining their growth, survival, cell death and other biochemical properties. We will also perform large scale comparisons for genomic and proteomic profiles of the diseased hESC lines with wild type hESCs, as well as comparing the “diseased” and wild type hESC-derived populations of motoneurons and astrocytes.

These experiments will not only provide direct clues for ALS pathogenesis research but also serve as a proof of principle for general disease research using hESCs as a model system. The protocols and reagents developed in this work will be available for Californian researchers and physicians to use for similar neurodegenerative diseases or diseases of other systems. This work will eventually facilitate the scale-up in establishment of human diseases models using human tissues or human cell culture systems for our colleagues in California and around the world.

Grant Type: 
Tools and Technologies I
Grant Number: 
RT1-01021
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$918 000
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Parkinson's Disease
Human Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 

Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have considerable potential as sources of differentiated cells for numerous biomedical applications. The ability to introduce targeted changes into the DNA of these cells – a process known as gene targeting – would have very broad implications. For example, mutations could readily be introduced into genes to study their roles in stem cell propagation and differentiation, to analyze mechanisms of human disease, and to develop disease models to aid in creating new therapies. Unfortunately, gene targeting efficiency in hESCs is very low. To meet this urgent need, we propose to develop new molecular tools and novel technologies for high efficiency gene targeting in hES and iPS cells. Importantly, this approach will be coupled with genome-wide identification and functional analysis of genes involved in the process in dopaminergic neuron development, work with fundamental implications for Parkinson's disease.

Barriers to targeted genetic modification include the effective delivery of gene targeting constructs into cells and the introduction of defined changes into the genome. We have developed a high throughput approach to engineer novel properties into a highly promising, safe, and clinically relevant gene delivery vehicle. For example, we have engineered variants of this vehicle with highly efficient gene delivery to neural stem cells (NSCs), and the resulting vehicles can mediate efficient gene targeting. We now propose to engineer novel gene delivery and targeting vehicles optimized for use in hESCs and iPS cells. One application of such an improved vector system will be to study the mechanism of ESC differentiation into dopaminergic neurons aided by the key transcription factor Lmx1a. We propose to identify target genes that are regulated by Lmx1a during dopaminergic neuron differentiation using the newly developed technique of ChIP-seq, in combination with RNA expression and bioinformatics analysis. This work will identify essential control genes that drive dopaminergic neuron differentiation. Furthermore, our improved gene delivery and targeting system will be used for overexpressing candidate genes, knocking them down via RNA interference, and knocking in reporter genes to analyze gene expression networks during neuronal differentiation.

The generation of efficient targeting technologies, in combination with genome wide analysis of gene regulation networks, will provide a general method for identifying and testing key regulatory genes for stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, as well as generating stem cell-based models of human disease. This blend of bioengineering and cell biology therefore has strong potential to create an important new capability for basic and applied stem cell research.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

This proposal will develop novel molecular tools and methodologies that will strongly enhance the scientific, technological, and economic development of stem cell therapeutics in California. The most important net benefit will be for the treatment of human diseases.

Efficiently introducing specific genetic modifications into a stem cell genome is a greatly enabling technology that would impact many downstream medical applications. This capability will further enable investigations of self-renewal and differentiation, two defining properties of human stem cells. New tools to introduce targeted alterations of ES and iPS cells will also yield key model systems to elucidate mechanisms of human disease, and most importantly enable the generation of mutant cell lines to serve as models of human disease and systems for high throughput screening to develop novel therapies. Finally, the reverse process, the repair of genetic lesions responsible for disease, can in the long run enable the generation of patent-specific stem cell lines for therapeutic application.

Each of these applications will directly benefit biomedical knowledge and human health. Furthermore, this proposal directly addresses several research targets of this RFA – the development and utilization of efficient homologous recombination techniques for gene targeting in human stem cells, the development of safer and more effective viral vectors for gene transduction in human stem cells, and the development and analysis of human embryonic stem cell lines with reporter genes inserted into key loci – indicating that CIRM believes that the proposed capabilities are a priority for California’s stem cell effort. While the potential applications of the proposed technology are broad, we will apply it to a specific and urgent biomedical problem: elucidating mechanisms of ES cell differentiation into dopaminergic neurons, part of a critical path towards developing therapies for Parkinson’s disease. While hESCs clearly have this capacity, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood, and the efficiency of this process must be improved. We will elucidate transcriptional networks that underlie this process, and utilize our novel gene targeting system to identify and analyze key components of these networks. This work will lead to a better fundamental understanding of mechanisms regulating stem cell differentiation, as well as enhance our ability to control this complex process for biomedical application.

The co-investigators have a strong record of translating basic science and engineering into practice through interactions with industry, including the founding of biotech companies in California. Finally, this collaborative project will focus diverse research groups with many students on an important interdisciplinary project at the interface of science and engineering, thereby training future employees and contributing to the technological and economic development of California.

Grant Type: 
Shared Labs
Grant Number: 
CL1-00501-1.2
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$5 893 682
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Human Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Age-related diseases of the nervous system are major challenges for biomedicine in the 21st century. These disorders, which include Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke, cause loss of neural tissue and functional impairment. Currently, there is no cure for these devastating neurological disorders. A promising approach to the treatment of age-related neurological disorders is cell therapy, i.e., transplantation of nerve cells into the brain or spinal cord to replace lost cells and restore function. Work in this field has been limited however, due to the limited availability of cells for transplantation. For example, cells from 6-10 human fetuses obtained 6-10 weeks post-conception are required for one patient with Parkinson’s disease to undergo transplantation.

Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) offer a potentially unlimited source of any cell type that may be required for cell replacement therapy, due to their remarkable ability to self-renew (they can divide indefinitely in culture) and to develop into any cell type in the body. In this proposal, we will build out approximately 3400 square feet of shared laboratory space within our existing research facility for hESC research, as well as approximately 2400 square feet for classroom facilities dedicated to training in hESC culture and manipulation. We seek to understand how hESCs differentiate into authentic, clinically useful nerve cells and will use novel molecular tools to examine the behavior of cells transplanted in animal models of human neurological disease. We will also need to develop a noninvasive method of following cells after transplantation and we propose to develop luciferase-tagged (light-emitting) hESC lines for in vivo animal imaging. In addition, we will use hESC-derived nerve cells to screen drug and chemical libraries for compounds that protect nerve cells from toxicity, and to develop in vitro disease models. We believe that these experiments are critical to enhancing our understanding of neurological diseases and providing the tools that will be necessary to move cell therapy to the clinic.

Before a hESC-based therapy can be developed, it is essential to train scientists to efficiently grow, maintain and manipulate these cells. We propose to teach four 5-day hands-on training courses – two basic and two advanced hESC culture courses per year – to California scientists free of charge. These courses will provide scientists with an understanding of hESC biology and will enable them to set up and conduct hESC research after completion of training.

In summary, the goal of this proposal is to provide over twenty investigators at the home institute and neighboring institutions with the ability to culture, differentiate, and genetically manipulate hESCs – including clinical-grade hESC lines – to develop diagnostic and therapeutic tools.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

We propose to build a Shared Research Laboratory and offer a Stem Cell Techniques Course for over twenty principal investigators at the home institute and neighboring institutes working collaboratively on stem-cell biology and neurological diseases of aging. We propose to: 1) Purify nerve cells at different stages of maturation from human embryonic stem cells and to develop transplantation strategies in animal models that mimic human diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, stroke and spinal cord injuries; 2) Screen drug and chemical libraries for reagents that protect nerve cells from toxicity and develop in vitro disease models using nerve cells generated from human embryonic stem cells; and 3) Assess the long-term integration and differentiation of transplanted cells using a non-invasive imaging system.

We believe these experiments provide not only a blueprint for moving stem-cell transplantation for Parkinson’s disease toward the clinic, but also a generalized plan for how stem-cell therapy can be developed to treat disorders like motor neuron disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease) and spinal cord injury. As the only stem-cell research facility in California’s 10-12 most northwest counties, we are uniquely positioned to extend the promised benefits of Proposition 71 to this large part of the state. The tools and reagents we develop will be made widely available to California researchers and we will select California-based companies for commercialization of any therapies that may result. We also hope that California-based physicians will be at the forefront of translating this promising avenue of research into clinical applications. Finally, we expect that the money expended on this research will benefit the California research and business communities, and that the tools and reagents we develop will help accelerate stem-cell research in California and worldwide.

Grant Type: 
New Faculty II
Grant Number: 
RN2-00952
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 847 600
Disease Focus: 
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stroke
Human Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

GOALS We propose to determine the effects of different forms of apoE on the development of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into functional neurons. In Aim 1, iPS cells will be generated from skin cells of adult knock-in (KI) mice expressing different forms of human apoE and in humans with different apoE genotypes. In Aim 2, the development of the iPS cells into functional neurons in culture and in mouse brains will be compared. In Aim 3, the effects of different forms of apoE on the functional recovery of mice with acute brain injury treated with iPS cell–derived neural stem cells (NSCs) will be assessed. RATIONALE AND SIGNIFICANCE The central nervous system (CNS) has limited ability to regenerate and recover after injury. For this reason, recovery from acute and chronic neurological diseases, such as stroke and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), is often incomplete and disability results. Embryonic stem cells have great promise for treating or curing neurological diseases, but their therapeutic use is limited by ethical concerns and by rejection reactions after allogenic transplantation. The generation of iPS cells from somatic cells offers a way to potentially circumvent the ethical issues and to generate patient- and disease-specific stem cells for future therapy. In the CNS, apoE plays important roles in lipid homeostasis and in neuronal maintenance. However, apoE2, apoE3, and apoE4 differ in their ability to accomplish these tasks. ApoE4, the major genetic risk factor for AD, is associated with poor clinical outcome and more rapid progression or greater severity of head trauma, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis—all potential targets of stem cell therapy. This proposal builds on three novel findings in human apoE-KI mice. (1) NSCs express apoE. (2) ApoE plays a role in cell-fate determination (neuron vs astrocyte) of NSCs. (3) ApoE4 impairs the neuronal development of NSCs. Thus, we hypothesize that transplantation of iPS cells derived from apoE4 carriers (~20% of the general population and ~50% of AD patients) might not be beneficial or even detrimental for patients with neurological diseases. We propose in vitro and in vivo studies to assess the effects of different forms of apoE on the development of iPS cells into functional neurons and on the functional recovery of mice with acute brain injury treated with iPS cell-derived NSCs. These studies will shed light on the regulation of neuronal development of iPS cells and help to “optimize” future iPS cell therapy for neurological diseases. SPECIFIC AIMS Aim 1. To establish adult mouse and human iPS cell lines with different apoE genotypes. Aim 2. To determine the isoform-specific effects of apoE on the development of iPS cells into functional neurons in culture and in mouse brains. Aim 3. To assess the isoform-specific effects of apoE on the functional recovery of mice with acute (stroke) brain injury treated with iPS cell-derived NSCs.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

CONTRIBUTION TO THE CALFORNIA ECONOMY: A major goal of regenerative medicine is to repair damaged cells or tissue. My research focuses on (1) understanding the role of neuronal regeneration in central nervous system function and (2) developing stem cell therapy for acute and chronic neurological diseases, including stroke and Alzheimer's disease. Stroke and Alzheimer's disease are the leading causes of disability and dementia and are the fastest growing form of neurological diseases in California, in the USA, and worldwide. My research could benefit the California economy by creating jobs in the biomedical sector. Ultimately, this study could help reduce the adverse impact of neurological diseases. Thereby, I hope to increase the productivity and enhance the quality of life for Californians. The results of my studies will also help develop new technology that could contribute to the California biotechnology industry. The studies will characterize multiple lines of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells carrying apoE3, a protein protective to the brain, or apoE4, which is detrimental to the brain and is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. These cell lines could be valuable for biotechnology companies and researchers who are screening for drug compounds targeting different neurological diseases. CONTRIBUTION TO THE HEALTH OF CALFORNIANS: The most important contribution of the studies will be to improve the health of Californians. Diseases that are the target of regenerative medicine, such as stroke and Alzheimer’s disease, are major causes of mortality and morbidity, resulting in billions of dollars in healthcare costs and lost productivity. As we continue our efforts in medical research, we hope to one day unlock the secrets of brain development and repair. This knowledge will help medical researchers develop beneficial therapies beyond what is currently available and potentially improve the quality of life and life expectancy of patients with neurological diseases, such as stroke and Alzheimer’s disease.

Grant Type: 
New Faculty II
Grant Number: 
RN2-00915
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 994 328
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Human Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Buried deep inside the brain are cells known as choroid plexus epithelial (CPe) cells. Although not as famous as other cells in the nervous system, CPe cells perform a large number of important jobs that keep the brain and spinal cord healthy. They produce the fluid (known as cerebrospinal fluid, or CSF) that bathes the brain and spinal cord with many nourishing chemicals, which promote normal nervous system health and function, learning and memory, and neural repair following injury. In addition, CPe cells protect the brain and spinal cord from toxins – such as heavy metals and the amyloid-beta peptide associated with Alzheimer’s disease – by absorbing them or preventing them from entering the nervous system altogether by forming the so-called blood-CSF barrier. Accordingly, as CPe functions diminish during normal aging or in accelerated fashion in certain diseases, memory loss, Alzheimer’s disease, and a number of other neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders may ensue or become worse. The ability to grow and make CPe cells should therefore enable many clinical applications, such as CPe cell replacements, transplants, and pharmaceutical studies to identify beneficial drugs that can pass through the blood-CSF barrier. However, all of these potential applications are limited by the current inability to make and expand CPe cells in culture. Our published and preliminary studies suggest that it should be feasible to generate CPe cells in culture. Our broad goals are to study how CPe cells form during normal development, then use this information to make human CPe cells for clinical applications. To achieve this goal, our approach will be to use mice to study how the CPe develops normally, then use both mouse and human stem cells to make CPe cells in culture. Our published and preliminary studies have defined one critical factor for this process (known as Bmp4) and identify candidate factors that work with Bmp4 to regulate whether or not CPe cells are formed. In Aim 1, we test whether a molecule known as Fgf8 provides CPe “competency” – i.e. whether Fgf8 allows cells to become CPe cells when exposed to Bmp4. In Aim 2, we test whether a gene known as Lhx2 prevents cortical cells from becoming CPe cells in response to Bmp4. In Aim 3, we manipulate Bmp4, Fgf8, and Lhx2 in hESC cultures to make human CPe cells. If successful, this proposal should greatly improve our understanding of normal CPe development and enable a number of CPe-based clinical applications with significant potential to improve human health.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Our proposal to study choroid plexus epithelial (CPe) cell development and to make CPe cells in culture for clinical applications should benefit the State of California and its citizens in a number of ways. In the short term, this project will provide employment, education and training in stem cell research for a handful of California residents, and will support California-based companies that provide supplies for the stem cell and biomedical research communities. In the longer term, success in making CPe cells in culture should enable many new CPe-based clinical applications, stimulate CPe studies and applications by stem cell companies, and enable screens to identify agents that allow for passage of therapeutics across the blood-CSF barrier, which remains a significant roadblock to the development of pharmaceuticals for neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Such outcomes would ultimately stimulate investment in California-based companies and benefit the health of many California citizens, which may reduce the economic burden of health care in the state.

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