Neurological Disorders

Coding Dimension ID: 
303
Coding Dimension path name: 
Neurological Disorders
Grant Type: 
Tools and Technologies II
Grant Number: 
RT2-01975
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 831 723
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Parkinson's Disease
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

The surgical tools currently available to transplant cells to the human brain are crude and underdeveloped. In current clinical trials, a syringe and needle device has been used to inject living cells into the brain. Because cells do not spread through the brain tissue after implantation, multiple brain penetrations (more than ten separate needle insertions in some patients) have been required to distribute cells in the diseased brain region. Every separate brain penetration carries a significant risk of bleeding and brain injury. Furthermore, this approach does not result in effective distribution of cells. Thus, our lack of appropriate surgical tools and techniques for clinical cell transplantation represents a significant roadblock to the treatment of brain diseases with stem cell based therapies. A more ideal device would be one that can distribute cells to large brain areas through a single initial brain penetration.

In rodents, cell transplantation has successfully treated a great number of different brain disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. However, the human brain is about 500 times larger than the mouse brain. While the syringe and needle transplantation technique works well in mice and rats, using this approach may not succeed in the much larger human brain, and this may result in failure of clinical trials for technical reasons.

We believe that the poor design of current surgical tools used for cell delivery is from inadequate interactions between basic stem cell scientists, medical device engineers, and neurosurgeons. Using a multidisciplinary approach, we will first use standard engineering principles to design, fabricate, refine, and validate an innovative cell delivery device that can transplant cells to a large region of the human brain through a single brain penetration. We will then test this new prototype in a large animal brain to ensure that the device is safe and effective. Furthermore, we will create a document containing engineering drawings, manufacturing instructions, surgical details, and preclinical data to ensure that this device is readily available for inclusion in future clinical trials.

By improving the safety and efficacy of cell delivery to the brain, the development of a superior device for cell transplantation may be a crucial step on the road to stem cell therapies for a wide range of brain diseases. In addition, devices and surgical techniques developed here may also be advantageous for use in other diseased organs.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

The citizens of California have invested generously into stem cell research for the treatment of human diseases. While significant progress has been made in our ability to produce appropriate cell types in clinically relevant numbers for transplantation to the brain, these efforts to cure disease may fail because of our inability to effectively deliver the cells. Our proposed development of a superior device for cell transplantation may thus be a crucial step on the road to stem cell therapies for a wide range of brain disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, stroke, brain tumors, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and traumatic brain injury. Furthermore, devices and surgical techniques developed in our work may also be advantageous for use in other diseased organs. Thus, with successful completion of our proposal, the broad community of stem cell researchers and physician-scientists will gain access to superior surgical tools with which to better leverage our investment into stem cell therapy.

Grant Type: 
Tools and Technologies II
Grant Number: 
RT2-01927
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 816 157
Disease Focus: 
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Human Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Elucidating how genetic variation contributes to disease susceptibility and drug response requires human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (hIPSC) lines from many human patients. Yet, current methods of hIPSC generation are labor-intensive and expensive. Thus, a cost-effective, non-labor intensive set of methods for hIPSC generation and characterization is essential to bring the translational potential of hIPSC to disease modeling, drug discovery, genomic analysis, etc.

Our project combines technology development and scaling methods to increase throughput and reduce cost of hiPSC generation at least 10-fold, enabling the demonstration, and criterion for success, that we can generate 300 useful hiPSC lines (6 independent lines each for 50 individuals) by the end of this project. Thus, we propose to develop an efficient, cost effective, and minimally labor-intensive pipeline of methods for hIPSC identification and characterization that will enable routine generation of tens to hundreds of independent hIPSC lines from human patients. We will achieve this goal by adapting two simple and high throughput methods to enable analysis of many candidate hIPSC lines in large pools. These methods are already working in our labs and are called "fluorescence cell barcoding" (FCB) and expression cell barcoding (ECB).

To reach a goal of generating 6 high quality hIPSC lines from one patient, as many as 60 candidate hIPSC colonies must be expanded and evaluated individually using labor and cost intensive methods. By improving culturing protocols, and implementing suitable pooled analysis strategies, we propose to increase throughput at least 10-fold with a substantial drop in cost. In outline, the pipeline we propose to develop will begin with the generation of 60 candidate hIPSC lines per patient directly in 96 well plates. All 60 will be analyzed for diagnostic hIPSC markers by FCB in 1 pooled sample. The 10 best candidates per patient will then be picked for expression and multilineage differentiation analyses with the goal of finding the best 6 from each patient for digital karyotype analyses. Success at 10-fold scaleup as proposed here may be the first step towards further scaleup once these methods are fully developed.

Aim 1: To develop a cost-effective and minimally labor-intensive set of methods/pipeline for the generation and characterization high quality hIPSC lines from large numbers of human patients. We will test suitability/develop a set of methods that allow inexpensive and rapid characterization of 60 candidate hIPSC lines per patient at a time.

Aim 2: To demonstrate/test/evaluate the success and cost-effectiveness of our pipeline by generating 6 high quality hIPSC lines from each of 50 human patients from [REDACTED]. We will obtain skin biopsies and expand fibroblasts from 50 patients, and generate and analyze a total of 6 independent hIPSC lines from each using the methods developed in Aim 1.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Many Californians suffer from diseases whose origin is poorly understood, and which are not treatable in an effective or economically advantageous manner. Part of solving this problem relies upon elucidating how genetic variation contributes to disease susceptibility and drug response and better understanding disease mechanism. Achieving these goals can be accelerated through the use of human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (hIPSC) lines from many human patients. Yet, current methods of hIPSC generation are labor-intensive and expensive. Thus, a cost-effective, non-labor intensive set of methods for hIPSC generation and characterization is essential to bring the translational potential of hIPSC to disease modeling, drug discovery, genomic analysis, etc.

If successful, our project will lead to breakthroughs in understanding of disease, development of better therapies, and economic development in California as businesses that use our methods are launched. In addition, new therapies will bring cost-savings in healthcare to Californians, stimulate employment since Californians will be employed in businesses that develop and sell these therapies, and relieve much suffering from the burdens of chronic disease.

Grant Type: 
Tools and Technologies II
Grant Number: 
RT2-01920
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 833 054
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
Human Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

This study will use Ataxia-Telangiectasia (A-T), an early-onset inherited neurodegenerative disease of children, as a model to study the mechanisms leading to cerebellar neurodegeneration and to develop a drug that can slow or halt neurodegeneration. We will start with skin cells that were originally grown from biopsies of patients with A-T who specifically carry “nonsense” type of mutations in the ATM gene. We will convert these skin cells to stem cells capable of forming neural cells that are lacking in the brain (cerebellum) of A-T patients; presumably these neural cells need ATM protein to develop normally. We will then test the effects of our most promising new “readthrough compounds” (RTCs) on the newly-developed neural cells. Our lab has been developing the drugs over the past six years. At present, there is no other disease model (animal or in a test tube) for evaluating the effects of RTCs on the nervous system and its development. Nor is there any effective treatment for the children with A-T or other progressively-deteriorating ataxias. Success in this project would open up at least three new areas for understanding and treating neurodegenerative diseases: 1) the laboratory availability of human neural cells with specific disease-causing mutations; 2) a new approach to learning how the human brain develops and 3) a new class of drugs (RTCs) that correct nonsense mutations, even in the brain, and may correct neurodegeneration.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

This project seeks to merge the expertise of two major research cultures: one with long-standing experience in developing a treatment for a progressive childhood-onset disease called Ataxia-telangiectasia and another with recent success in converting skin cells into cells of the nervous system. California citizens will benefit by finding new ways to treat neurodegenerative diseases, like A-T, Parkinson and Alzheimer, and expanding the many possible applications of stem cell technology to medicine. More specifically, we will construct a new “disease in a dish” model for neurodegeneration, and this will enable our scientists to test the positive and negative effects of a new class of drugs for correcting inherited diseases/mutations directly on brain cells. These advances will drastically decrease drug development costs and will stimulate new biotech opportunities and increase tax revenues for California, while also training the next generation of young scientists to deliver these new medical products to physicians and patients within the next five years.

Grant Type: 
Tools and Technologies II
Grant Number: 
RT2-01906
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 884 808
Disease Focus: 
Autism
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
Human Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are a heritable group of neuro-developmental disorders characterized by language impairments, difficulties in social integrations, and the presence of stereotyped and repetitive behaviors. There are no treatments for ASDs, and very few targets for drug development. Recent evidence suggests that some types of ASDs are caused by defects in calcium signaling during development of the nervous system. We have identified cellular defects in neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with Timothy Syndrome (TS), caused by a rare mutation in a calcium channel that leads to autism. We propose to use cells carrying this mutant calcium channel to identify drugs that act on calcium signaling pathways that are involved in ASDs.

Our research project has three aims. First, we will determine whether known channel modulators reverse the cellular defects we observe in cells from TS patients. It is possible that we will find that existing drugs already approved for use in humans might be effective for treating this rare but devastating disorder.

Our second aim is to determine whether screens using neuronal cells derived from ASD patients can be used to identify calcium signaling modulators. A bottleneck to therapy development for ASDs has been the lack of appropriate in vitro models for these disorders, and we would like to determine whether our studies could serve as the basis for a new type of screen in human neurons.

Our third aim is to identify signaling molecules that might be affected in patients with ASDs, which could be targets for future drug discovery. There is increasing evidence that several types of ASDs are caused by defects in neuronal activity and calcium signaling. More specifically, the CaV1.2 calcium channel that we are studying has been implicated in syndromic and non-syndromic forms of autism, and also in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. One of the more exciting aspects of our screen of neurons with a mutation in CaV1.2 is that it gives us a tool to explore calcium-mediated signaling pathways that are defective in ASDs. We will try to modify calcium signaling in neurons from ASD patients by changing the expression of proteins that are known to affect calcium signaling in other contexts. These experiments will identify targets that are active in human neurons and that affect cellular phenotypes that are defective in ASD.

In summary, the work described in this proposal constitutes a critical step to fulfilling the promise that reprogramming of patient-specific cells offers for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism. Our studies will identify lead compounds that could be tested in the clinic for a rare form of autism, and novel molecular targets for therapeutic development in the future. Importantly, these studies will provide a proof of principle that iPSC-derived cells are valuable for drug discovery for neuropsychiatric disorders.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) affect approximately 1 in 110 children in California. In addition to the devastating effects that ASDs have on the families of affected individuals, treating and educating people with ASDs imposes a heavy economic burden on the state. In 2007, almost 35,000 individuals with autism were receiving services from the California Regional Centers, and the number was expected to rise to 50,000 by last year. Recent estimates suggest that the lifetime cost of caring for an individual with an ASD can exceed $3 million.

In spite of their impact on our society, there are currently no effective therapies for ASDs. Our lack of cellular and molecular tools to study these disorders means that there are no good targets for drug screening, so there are very limited prospects for developing effective pharmacological treatments in the near future. New drug discovery paradigms are needed to help develop therapies for these neuropsychiatric conditions.

The research described in this proposal could have a dramatic impact on drug discovery methods for ASDs. First, we hope to identify drugs that are effective in treating Timothy Syndrome, a rare form of autism caused by an electrophysiological defect in a calcium channel. Second, we aim to develop new tools to explore calcium-mediated signaling pathways that are defective in ASDs. If successful, our research will identify a family of molecular targets that will be useful for developing therapies for ASDs in the future.

Grant Type: 
Tools and Technologies II
Grant Number: 
RT2-01881
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 825 613
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Stroke
Human Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. Most patients survive their initial stroke, but do not recover fully. Because of incomplete recovery, up to 1/3 of stroke patients are taken from independence to a nursing home or assisted living environment, and most are left with some disability in strength or control of the arms or legs. There is no treatment that promotes brain repair and recovery in this disease. Recent studies have shown that stem cell transplantation into the brain can promote repair and recovery in animal models of stroke. However, a stem cell therapy for stroke has not reached the clinic. There are at least three limitations to the development of a human stroke stem cell therapy: most of the transplanted cells die, most of the cells that survive do not interact with the surrounding brain, and the process of injecting stem cells into the brain may damage the normal brain tissue that is near the stroke site. The studies in this grant develop a novel investigative team and research approach to achieve a solution to these limits. Using the combined expertise of engineering, stem cell biology and stroke scientists the studies in this grant will develop tissue bioengineering systems for a stem cell therapy in stroke. The studies will develop a biopolymer hydrogel that provides a pro-growth and pro-survival environment for stem cells when injected with them into the brain. This approach has three unique aspects. First, the hydrogel system utilizes biological components that mimic the normal brain environment and releases specific growth factors that enhance transplanted stem cell survival. Second, these growth factors will also likely stimulate the normal brain to undergo repair and recovery, providing a dual mechanism for neural repair after stroke. Third, this approach allows targeting of the stroke cavity for a stem cell transplant, and not normal brain. The stroke cavity is an ideal target for a stroke stem cell therapy, as it is a cavity and can receive a stem cell transplant without displacing normal brain, and it lies adjacent to the site in the brain of most recovery in this disease—placing the stem cell transplant near the target brain region for repair in stroke.
The progress from stroke stem cell research has identified stem cell transplantation as a promising treatment for stroke. The research in this grant develops a next generation in stem cell therapies for the brain by combining new bioengineering techniques to develop an integrated hydrogel/stem cell system for transplantation, survival and neural repair in this disease.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Advances in the early treatment of stroke have led to a decline in the death rate from this disease. At the same time, the overall incidence of stroke is projected to substantially increase because of the aging population. These two facts mean that stroke will not be lethal, but instead produce a greater number of disabled survivors. A 2006 estimate placed over half of the annual cost in stroke as committed to disabled stroke survivors, and exceeding $30 billion per year in the United States. The studies in this grant develop a novel stem cell therapy in stroke by focusing on one major bottleneck in this disease: the inability of most stem cell therapies to survive and repair the injured brain. With its large population California accounts for roughly 24% of all stroke hospital discharges in the Unites States. The development of a new stem cell therapy approach for this disease will lead to a direct benefit to the State of California.

Grant Type: 
Tools and Technologies II
Grant Number: 
RT2-01880
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 619 627
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Parkinson's Disease
Human Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

The objective of this study is to develop a new, optimized technology to obtain a homogenous population of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons in a culture dish through neuronal differentiation. Dopaminergic neurons of the midbrain are the main source of dopamine in the mammalian central nervous system. Their loss is associated with one of the most prominent human neurological disorders, Parkinson's disease (PD). There is no cure for PD, or good long-term therapeutics without deleterious side effects. Therefore, there is a great need for novel drugs and therapies to halt or reverse the disease.

Recent groundbreaking discoveries allow us to use adult human skin cells, transduce them with specific genes, and generate cells that exhibit virtually all characteristics of embryonic stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). These cell lines, when derived from PD patient skin cells, can be used as an experimental pre-clinical model to study disease mechanisms unique to PD. These cells will not only serve as an ‘authentic’ model for PD when further differentiated into the specific dopaminergic neurons, but that these cells are actually pathologically affected with PD.

All of the current protocols for directed neuronal differentiation from iPSCs are lengthy and suboptimal in terms of efficiency and reproducibility of defined cell populations. This hinders the ability to establish a robust model in-a-dish for the disease of interest, in our case PD-related neurodegeneration. We will use a new, efficient gene integration technology to induce expression of midbrain specific transcription factors in iPSC lines derived from a patient with PD and a sibling control. Forced expression of these midbrain transcription factors will direct iPSCs to differentiate into DA neurons in cell culture. We aim at achieving higher efficiency and reproducibility in generating a homogenous population of midbrain DA neurons, which will lay the foundation for successfully modeling PD and improving hit rates of future drug screening approaches. Our study could also set a milestone towards the establishment of efficient, stable, and reproducible neuronal differentiation using a technology that has proven to be safe and is therefore suitable for cell replacement therapies in human.

The absence of cellular models of Parkinson’s disease represents a major bottleneck in the scientific field of Parkinson’s disease, which, if solved, would be instantly translated into a wide range of clinical applications, including drug discovery. This is an essential avenue if we want to offer our patients a new therapeutic approach that can give them a near normal life after being diagnosed with this progressively disabling disease.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

The proposed research could lead to a robust model in-a-dish for Parkinson’s disease (PD)-related neurodegeneration. This outcome would deliver a variety of benefits to the state of California.

First, there would be a profound personal impact on patients and their families if the current inevitable decline of PD patients could be halted or reversed. This would bring great happiness and satisfaction to the tens of thousands of Californians affected directly or indirectly by PD.

Progress toward a cure for PD is also likely to accelerate the development of treatments for other degenerative disorders. The technology for PD modeling in-a-dish could be applied to other cell types such as cardiomyocytes (for heart diseases) and beta-cells (for diabetes). The impact would likely stimulate medical progress on a variety of conditions in which stem cell based drug screening and therapy could be beneficial.

An effective drug and therapy for PD would also bring economic benefits to the state. Currently, there is a huge burden of costs associated with the care of patients with long-term degenerative disorders like PD, which afflict tens of thousands of patients statewide. If the clinical condition of these patients could be improved, the cost of maintenance would be reduced, saving billions in medical costs. Many of these patients would be more able to contribute to the workforce and pay taxes.

Another benefit is the effect of novel, cutting-edge technologies developed in California on the business economy of the state. Such technologies can have a profound effect on the competitiveness of California through the formation of new manufacturing and health care delivery facilities that would employ California citizens and bring new sources of revenue to the state.

Therefore, this project has the potential to bring health and economic benefits to California that is highly desirable for the state.

Grant Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01749
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 752 058
Disease Focus: 
Epilepsy
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
Human Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Many neurological disorders are characterized by an imbalance between excitation and inhibition. Our ultimate goal: to develop a cell-based therapy to modulate aberrant brain activity in the treatment of these disorders. Our initial focus is on epilepsy. In 20-30% of these patients, seizures are unresponsive to drugs, requiring invasive surgical resection of brain regions with aberrant activity. The candidate cells we propose to develop can inhibit hyperactive neural circuits after implantation into the damaged brain. As such, these cells could provide an effective treatment not just for epilepsy, but also for a variety of other neurological conditions like Parkinson's, traumatic brain injury, and spasticity after spinal cord injury. We propose to bring a development candidate, a neuronal cell therapy, to the point of preclinical development. The neurons that normally inhibit brain circuits originate from a region of the developing brain called the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE). When MGE cells are grafted into the postnatal or adult brain, they disperse seamlessly and form inhibitory neurons that modulate local circuits. This property of MGE cells has not been shown for any other type of neural precursor. Our recent studies demonstrate that MGE cells grafted into an animal model of epilepsy can significantly decrease the number and severity of seizures. Other "proof-of-principle" studies suggest that these progenitor cells can be effective treatments in Parkinson's. In a separate effort, we are developing methods to differentiate large numbers of human MGE (H-MGE) cells from embryonic stem (ES) cells. To translate this therapy to humans, we need to determine how many MGE cells are required to increase inhibition after grafting and establish that this transplantation does not have unwanted side-effects. In addition, we need simple assays and reagents to test preparations of H-MGE cells to determine that they have the desired migratory properties and differentiate into nerve cells with the expected inhibitory properties. At present, these issues hinder development of this cell-based therapy in California and worldwide. We propose: (1) to perform "dose-response" experiments using different graft sizes of MGE cells and determine the minimal amount needed to increase inhibition; (2) to test whether MGE transplantation affects the survival of host neurons or has unexpected side-effects on the behavior of the grafted animals; (3) to develop simple in vitro assays (and identify reagents) to test H-MGE cells before transplantation. Our application takes advantage of an established multi-lab collaboration between basic scientists and clinicians. We also have the advice of neurosurgeons, epilepsy neurologists and a laboratory with expertise in animal behavior. If a safe cell-based therapy to replace lost inhibitory interneurons can be developed and validated, then clinical trials in patients destined for invasive neurosurgical resections could proceed.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

This proposal is designed to accelerate progress toward development of a novel cell-based therapy with potentially broad benefit for the treatment of multiple neurological diseases. The potential to translate our basic science findings into a treatment that could benefit patients is our primary focus and our initial target disease is epilepsy. This work will provide benefits to the State of California in the following areas:

* California epilepsy patients and patients with other neurological diseases will benefit from improved therapies. The number of patients refractory to available medications is significant: a recent report from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention [www.cdc.gov/epilepsy/] estimates that 1 out of 100 adults have epilepsy and up to one-third of these patients are not receiving adequate treatment. In California, it is one of the most common disabling neurological conditions. In most states, including California, epileptic patients whose seizures aren't well-controlled cannot obtain a driver's license or work certain jobs -- truck driving, air traffic control, firefighting, law enforcement, and piloting. The annual cost estimates to treat epilepsy range from $12 to $16 billion in the U.S. Current therapies curb seizures through pharmacological management but are not designed to modify brain circuits that are damaged or dysfunctional. The goals of our research program is to develop a novel cell-based therapy with the potential to eliminate seizures and improve the quality of life for this patient population, as well as decrease the financial burden to the patients' families, private insurers, and state agencies. Since MGE cells can mediate inhibition in other neurological and psychiatric diseases, the neural based therapy we are proposing is likely to have a therapeutic and financial impact that is much broader.

* Technology transfer in California. Historically, California institutions have developed and implemented a steady flow of technology transfer. Based on these precedents and the translational potential of our research goals, both to provide bioassays and potentially useful markers to follow the differentiation of MGE cells, this program is likely to result in licensing of further technology to the corporate sector. This will have an impact on the overall competitiveness of our state's technology sector and the resulting potential for creation of new jobs.

* Stem cell scientists training and recruitment in California. As part of this proposal we will train a student, technicians, and associated postdocs in MGE progenitor derivation, transplantation, and cell-based therapy for brain repair. Moreover, the translational nature of the disease-oriented proposal will result in new technology which we expect to be transferable to industry partners for facilitate development into new clinical alternatives.

Grant Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01767
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 708 549
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Trauma
Collaborative Funder: 
Maryland
Human Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects 1.4 million Americans a year; 175,000 in California. When the brain is injured, nerve cells near the site of injury die due to the initial trauma and interruption of blood flow. Secondary damage occurs as neighboring tissue is injured by the inflammatory response to the initial injury, leading to a larger area of damage. This damage happens to both neurons, the electrically active cells, and oligodendrocytes, the cell which makes the myelin insulation. A TBI patient typically loses cognitive function in one or more domains associated with the damage (e.g. attention deficits with frontal damage, or learning and memory deficits associated with temporal lobe/hippocampal damage); post-traumatic seizures are also common. Currently, no treatments have been shown to be beneficial in alleviating the cognitive problems following even a mild TBI.

Neural stem cells (NSCs) provide a cell population that is promising as a therapeutic for neurotrauma. One idea is that transplanting NSCs into an injury would provide “cell replacement”; the stem cells would differentiate into new neurons and new oligodendrocytes and fill in for lost host cells. We have successfully used “sorted“ human NSCs in rodent models of spinal cord injury, showing that hNSCs migrate, proliferate, differentiate into oligodendrocytes and neurons, integrate with the host, and restore locomotor function. Killing the NSCs abolishes functional improvements, showing that integration of hNSCs mediates recovery. Two Phase I FDA trials support the potential of using sorted hNSC for brain therapy and were partially supported by studies in my lab. NSCs may also improve outcome by helping the host tissue repair itself, or by providing trophic support for newly born neurons following injury. Recently, transplantation of rodent-derived NSCs into a model of TBI showed limited, but significant improvements in some outcome measures. These results argue for the need to develop human-derived NSCs that can be used for TBI.

We will establish and characterize multiple “sorted” and “non-sorted“ human NSC lines starting from 3 human ES lines. We will determine their neural potential in cell culture, and use the best 2 lines in an animal model of TBI, measuring learning, memory and seizure activity following TBI; then correlating these outcomes to tissue modifying effects. Ultimately, the proposed work may generate one or more human NSC lines suitable to use for TBI and/or other CNS injuries or disorders. A small reduction in the size of the injury or restoration of just some nerve fibers to their targets beyond the injury could have significant implications for a patient’s quality of life and considerable economic impact to the people of California. If successful over the 3-year grant, additional funding of this approach may enable a clinical trial within the next five years given success in the Phase I FDA approved trials of sorted hNSCs for other nervous system disorders.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects 1.4 million Americans every year. This equates to ~175,000 Californian’s suffering a TBI each year. Additionally, at least 5.3 million Americans currently have a long-term or a lifelong need for help to perform activities of daily living as a result of suffering a TBI previously. Forty percent of patients who are hospitalized with a TBI had at least one unmet need for services one year after their injury. One example is a need to improve their memory and problem solving skills. TBI can also cause epilepsy and increases the risk for conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and other brain disorders that become more prevalent with age. The combined direct medical costs and indirect costs such as lost productivity due to TBI totaled an estimated $60 billion in the United States in 2000 (when the most recent data was available). This translates to ~$7.5 billion in costs each year just to Californians.

The proposed research seeks to generate several human neural-restricted stem cell lines from ES cells. These “sorted” neural-restricted stem cell lines should have greatly reduced or no tumor forming capability, making them ideally suited for clinical use. After verifying that these lines are multipotent (e.g. they can make neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes), we will test their efficacy to improve outcomes in TBI on a number of measures, including learning and memory, seizure activity, tissue sparing, preservation of host neurons, and improvements in white matter pathology. Of benefit to California is that these same outcome measures in a rodent model of TBI can also be assessed in humans with TBI, potentially speeding the translational from laboratory to clinical application.

A small reduction in the size of the injury, or restoration of just some nerve fibers to their targets beyond the injury, or moderate improvement in learning and memory post-TBI, or a reduction in the number or severity of seizures could have significant implications for a patient’s quality of life and considerable economic impact to the people of California. Additionally, the cell lines we have chosen to work with are unencumbered with IP issues that would prevent us, or others, from using these cell lines to test in other central nervous system disorders. Two of the cell lines have already been manufactured to “GMP” standards, which would speed up the translation of this work from the laboratory to the clinic. Finally, if successful, these lines would be potentially useful for treating a variety of central nervous system disorders in addition to TBI, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, autism, spinal cord injury, and/or multiple sclerosis.

Grant Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01785-B
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 614 441
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Spinal Cord Injury
Human Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 

Injuries to the spinal cord commonly result from motor vehicle accidents, traumatic falls, diving, surfing, skiing, and snowboarding accidents, other forms of sports injuries, as well as from gunshot injuries in victims of violent crimes. Injuries to the anatomically lowest part of the spinal cord, the lumbosacral portion and its associated nerve roots commonly cause paralysis, loss of sensation, severe pain, as well as loss of bladder, bowel, and sexual function. Lumbosacral injuries represent approximately one-fifth of all traumatic lesions to the human spinal cord.

As a result of the direct injury to the lumbosacral portion of the spinal cord, there is degeneration and death of spinal cord nerve cells, which control muscles in the legs as well as bladder, bowel, and sexual function. No treatments are presently available in clinical practice to reverse the effects of these devastating injuries.

In order to reverse the loss of function after lumbosacral spinal cord injury, replacement of the lost nerve cells is required. Recent research studies have identified some properties that are shared by spinal cord neurons responsible for muscle and bladder control. Human embryonic stem cells can now be prepared in research laboratories to develop properties that are shared between nerve cells controlling muscle and bladder function. Such nerve cells are particularly at risk of degeneration and death as a result of injuries to the lumbosacral spinal cord. Human embryonic stem cells, which have undergone treatment to obtain properties of muscle and bladder controlling nerve cells, are now very attractive development candidates for new cell replacement therapies after lumbosacral spinal cord injuries. The proposed feasibility studies will study the properties of such cells in a clinically relevant rat model for lumbosacral spinal cord injuries.

In Specific Aim 1, we will determine whether ACUTE transplantation of human embryonic stem cells, which have been treated to develop properties of specific lumbosacral spinal cord neurons, may replace lost nerve cells and result in a return of bladder function in a rat model of lumbosacral spinal cord injury and repair.

In Specific Aim 2, we will determine whether DELAYED transplantation of human embryonic stem cells, which have been treated to develop properties of specific lumbosacral spinal cord neurons, may replace lost nerve cells and result in a return of bladder function in a rat model of lumbosacral spinal cord injury and repair.

A variety of functional studies will determine the effect of the cell transplantation on bladder function, walking, and pain. We will also use detailed anatomical studies to determine in microscopes whether the transplanted cells have grown processes to connect with pelvic target tissues, including the lower urinary tract. If successful, the proposed experiments may lead to a new treatment strategy for patients with lumbosacral spinal cord injuries.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

There are presently about 250,000 patients living with neurological impairments from spinal cord injuries (SCIs) in the United States, and approximately 11,000 new cases present every year. SCIs typically result in paralysis, loss of sensation, pain as well as bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction. No successful treatments are available to reverse the neurological deficits that result from SCI. Common causes for SCIs include car and motorcycle accidents, skiing, diving, surfing, and snow boarding injuries, traumatic falls, sports injuries, and acts of violence. California medical centers encounter a large proportion of the overall cases in the U.S. because of our large population, extensive network of freeways, and an active life style with recreational activities taking place both along the Californian coastline and in the mountains.

The proposed development candidate feasibility project will capitalize on recent progress in human stem cell science and surgical repair of conus medullaris/cauda equina (CM/CE) forms of SCI. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons and neuronal progenitors, which express the transcription factor Hb9, will be transplanted into the conus medullaris in attempts to replace lost motor and autonomic neurons after a lumbosacral ventral root avulsion injury in rats. Surgical replantation of avulsed lumbosacral ventral roots into the spinal cord will also be performed in this clinically relevant model for CM/CE injury and repair.

If successful, our development candidate may reinnervate muscles and pelvic organs, including the lower urinary tract after CM/CE forms of SCI. Return of functional bladder control represents one of the absolute top priorities among the spinal cord injured population (Anderson, J Neurotrauma, 2004; 21, 1371-83). Successful recovery of bladder function after SCI is expected to have very significant impact on the quality of life of spinal cord injured subjects and markedly reduce health care costs.

Recovery of bladder function in spinal cord injured subjects would markedly reduce or eliminate the need for intermittent bladder catheterizations and indwelling bladder catheters. The number of visits in physicians’ offices and already over-crowded California emergency rooms for bladder infections and other complications would be markedly reduced, thereby significantly reducing health care costs for both patients and our state. Improved neurological function among the SCI population is also expected to reduce care giver needs, thereby further reducing health care costs. The increased independence that will result from improved bladder control and concomitant possible recovery of other neurological functions, for instance in transfers and locomotion, will promote return to and participation in the work force for many individuals with SCI. These effects are also expected to bring a very positive effect to the California economy and increased quality of life for those living with an SCI.

Grant Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01785-A
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 614 441
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Spinal Cord Injury
Human Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Injuries to the spinal cord commonly result from motor vehicle accidents, traumatic falls, diving, surfing, skiing, and snowboarding accidents, other forms of sports injuries, as well as from gunshot injuries in victims of violent crimes. Injuries to the anatomically lowest part of the spinal cord, the lumbosacral portion and its associated nerve roots commonly cause paralysis, loss of sensation, severe pain, as well as loss of bladder, bowel, and sexual function. Lumbosacral injuries represent approximately one-fifth of all traumatic lesions to the human spinal cord.

As a result of the direct injury to the lumbosacral portion of the spinal cord, there is degeneration and death of spinal cord nerve cells, which control muscles in the legs as well as bladder, bowel, and sexual function. No treatments are presently available in clinical practice to reverse the effects of these devastating injuries.

In order to reverse the loss of function after lumbosacral spinal cord injury, replacement of the lost nerve cells is required. Recent research studies have identified some properties that are shared by spinal cord neurons responsible for muscle and bladder control. Human embryonic stem cells can now be prepared in research laboratories to develop properties that are shared between nerve cells controlling muscle and bladder function. Such nerve cells are particularly at risk of degeneration and death as a result of injuries to the lumbosacral spinal cord. Human embryonic stem cells, which have undergone treatment to obtain properties of muscle and bladder controlling nerve cells, are now very attractive development candidates for new cell replacement therapies after lumbosacral spinal cord injuries. The proposed feasibility studies will study the properties of such cells in a clinically relevant rat model for lumbosacral spinal cord injuries.

In Specific Aim 1, we will determine whether ACUTE transplantation of human embryonic stem cells, which have been treated to develop properties of specific lumbosacral spinal cord neurons, may replace lost nerve cells and result in a return of bladder function in a rat model of lumbosacral spinal cord injury and repair.

In Specific Aim 2, we will determine whether DELAYED transplantation of human embryonic stem cells, which have been treated to develop properties of specific lumbosacral spinal cord neurons, may replace lost nerve cells and result in a return of bladder function in a rat model of lumbosacral spinal cord injury and repair.

A variety of functional studies will determine the effect of the cell transplantation on bladder function, walking, and pain. We will also use detailed anatomical studies to determine in microscopes whether the transplanted cells have grown processes to connect with pelvic target tissues, including the lower urinary tract. If successful, the proposed experiments may lead to a new treatment strategy for patients with lumbosacral spinal cord injuries.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

There are presently about 250,000 patients living with neurological impairments from spinal cord injuries (SCIs) in the United States, and approximately 11,000 new cases present every year. SCIs typically result in paralysis, loss of sensation, pain as well as bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction. No successful treatments are available to reverse the neurological deficits that result from SCI. Common causes for SCIs include car and motorcycle accidents, skiing, diving, surfing, and snow boarding injuries, traumatic falls, sports injuries, and acts of violence. California medical centers encounter a large proportion of the overall cases in the U.S. because of our large population, extensive network of freeways, and an active life style with recreational activities taking place both along the Californian coastline and in the mountains.

The proposed development candidate feasibility project will capitalize on recent progress in human stem cell science and surgical repair of conus medullaris/cauda equina (CM/CE) forms of SCI. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons and neuronal progenitors, which express the transcription factor Hb9, will be transplanted into the conus medullaris in attempts to replace lost motor and autonomic neurons after a lumbosacral ventral root avulsion injury in rats. Surgical replantation of avulsed lumbosacral ventral roots into the spinal cord will also be performed in this clinically relevant model for CM/CE injury and repair.

If successful, our development candidate may reinnervate muscles and pelvic organs, including the lower urinary tract after CM/CE forms of SCI. Return of functional bladder control represents one of the absolute top priorities among the spinal cord injured population (Anderson, J Neurotrauma, 2004; 21, 1371-83). Successful recovery of bladder function after SCI is expected to have very significant impact on the quality of life of spinal cord injured subjects and markedly reduce health care costs.

Recovery of bladder function in spinal cord injured subjects would markedly reduce or eliminate the need for intermittent bladder catheterizations and indwelling bladder catheters. The number of visits in physicians’ offices and already over-crowded California emergency rooms for bladder infections and other complications would be markedly reduced, thereby significantly reducing health care costs for both patients and our state. Improved neurological function among the SCI population is also expected to reduce care giver needs, thereby further reducing health care costs. The increased independence that will result from improved bladder control and concomitant possible recovery of other neurological functions, for instance in transfers and locomotion, will promote return to and participation in the work force for many individuals with SCI. These effects are also expected to bring a very positive effect to the California economy and increased quality of life for those living with an SCI.

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