Neurological Disorders

Coding Dimension ID: 
303
Coding Dimension path name: 
Neurological Disorders
Funding Type: 
Tissue Collection for Disease Modeling
Grant Number: 
IT1-06571
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$530 265
Disease Focus: 
Autism
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a family of disabling disorders of the developing brain that affect about 1% of the population. Studying the biology of these conditions has been difficult as they have been challenging to represent in animal models. The core symptoms of ASD, including deficits in social communication, imagination and curiosity are intrinsically human and difficult to model in organisms commonly studied in the laboratory. Ideally, the mechanisms underlying ASDs need to be studied in human patients and in their cells. Since they maintain the genetic profile of an individual, studying neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) is attractive as a method for studying neurons from ASD patients. hiPSC based studies of ASDs hold promise to uncover deficits in cellular development and function, to evaluate susceptibility to environmental insults, and for screening of novel therapeutics. In this project our goal is to contribute blood and skin samples for hiPSC research from 200 children with an ASD and 100 control subjects to the CIRM repository. To maximize the value of the collected tissue, all subjects will have undergone comprehensive clinical evaluation of their ASD. The cells collected through this project will be made available to the wider research community and should result in a resource that will enable research on hiPSC-derived neurons on a scale and depth that is unmatched anywhere else in the world.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The prevalence and impact of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in California is staggering. California has experienced 13% new ASD cases each year since 2002. ASD are a highly heritable family of complex neurodevelopmental conditions affecting the brain, with core symptoms of impaired social skills, language, behavior and intellectual abilities. The majority with an ASD experience lifelong disability that requires intensive parental, school, and social support. The result has been a 12-fold increase in the number of people receiving ASD services in California since 1987, with over 50,000 people with ASDs served by developmental and regional centers. Within the school system, the number of special education students with ASD in California has more than tripled between 2002 and 2010. The economic, social and psychological toll is enormous. It is critical to both prevent and develop effective treatments for ASD. While rare genetic mutations account for a minority of cases, our understanding of idiopathic ASD (>85% of cases) is extremely limited. Mechanisms underlying ASDs need to be studied in human patients and in cells that share the genetic background of these patients. Since they maintain the complete genetic background of an individual, hiPSCs represent a very practical and direct method for investigating neurons from ASD patients to uncover cellular deficits in their development and function, and for screening of novel therapeutics.
Progress Report: 
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) have a worldwide prevalence of 1% (>1.5 million in the US) and a lifetime cost per affected individual of $3.2M. ASDs are amongst the most heritable of psychiatric disorders. Genome Wide Association studies utilizing samples in the thousands provide only weak evidence for common allele risk effects; positive findings rarely replicate, and genetic effects sizes are small (odds ratios of ~1.1). In contrast, evidence to date for risk or causation conferred by rare variation, particularly rare copy number variants, is very strong. Pathway analyses of the rare mutations implicated and genome-wide transcriptome analysis of brain and blood tissue provide converging evidence that neural-related pathways are central to the development of autism. Core impairments of ASDs, such as imagination and curiosity about the environment, cannot be modeled well in other organisms. The mechanisms underlying ASDs need to be studied in humans and cells that share the genetic background of the patients, such as neurons from patients derived from induced pluripotent cell lines (iPSC).
  • Our goal was to provide the CIRM repository with samples from 200 well characterized individuals with an ASD and 100 demographically matched controls. To date we have enrolled 63 participants.
Funding Type: 
New Faculty Physician Scientist
Grant Number: 
RN3-06530
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 031 737
Disease Focus: 
Neuropathy
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
The applicant is an MD/PhD trained physician scientist, whose clinical expertise is neuromuscular disorders including peripheral nerve disease. The proposal is aimed at providing a research proposal and career development plan that will allow the applicant to develop an independent research program, which attempts to bring stem cell based therapies to patients with peripheral nerve diseases. The proposal will use “adult stem cells” derived from patients with an inherited nerve disease, correct the genetic abnormality in those cells, and determine the feasibility of transplanting the genetically engineered cells back into peripheral nerve to slow disease progression.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The proposed research will benefit the State of California as it will support the career development of a uniquely trained physician scientist to establish an innovative translational stem cell research program aimed toward direct clinical application to patients. The cutting edge technologies proposed are directly in line with the fundamental purpose of the California Initiative for Regenerative Medicine. If successful, both scientific and patient advocate organizations would recognize that these advances came directly from the unique efforts of CIRM and the State of California to lead the world in stem cell research. Finally, as a result of funding of this award, further financial investments from private and public funding organizations would directly benefit the State in the years to come.
Progress Report: 
  • During this award period we have made significant progress. We have established induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from four patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) due to the PMP22 duplication. We have validated our strategy to genetically engineer induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with inherited neuropathy, and have genetically engineered several patient lines. We further have begun to differentiate these iPSCs into Schwann cell precursors, to begin to investigate cell type specific defects that cause peripheral neurodegeneration in patients with CMT1A. Finally we have imported and characterized a transgenic rat model of CMT1A in order to begin to investigate the ability to inject iPSC derived Schwann cell precursors into rodent nerves as a possible neuroprotective strategy.
  • During this reporting period we developed genetically corrected induced pluripotent stem cell lines from patients with CMT1A. We improved and validated a novel method for differentiating Schwann cells from iPSCs, and used this to generate human Schwann cells from patients and controls. Finally we have initiated pilot studies injecting human iPSC derived Schwann cells into the peripheral nerves of rats with myelin diseases to determine whether cell replacement therapy is a viable strategy in these disorders.
Funding Type: 
New Faculty Physician Scientist
Grant Number: 
RN3-06510
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 800 536
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Brain Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Chemotherapy for cancer is often life saving, but it also causes a debilitating syndrome of impaired cognition characterized by deficits in attention, concentration, information processing speed, multitasking and memory. As a result, many cancer survivors find themselves unable to return to work or function in their lives as they had before their cancer therapy. These cognitive deficits, colloquially known as "chemobrain" or "chemofog," are long-lasting and sometimes irreversible. For example, breast cancer survivors treated with chemotherapy suffer from cognitive disability even 20 years later. These cognitive problems occur because chemotherapy damages the neural stem and precursor cells necessary for the health of the brain's infrastructure, called white matter. We have discovered a powerful way to recruit the stem/precursor cells required for white matter repair that depends on an interaction between the electrical cells of the brain, neurons, and these white matter stem/precursor cells. In this project, we will determine the key molecules responsible for the regenerative influence of neurons on these white matter stem cells and will develop that molecule (or molecules) into a drug to treat chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction. If successful, this will result in the first effective treatment for a disease that affects at least a million cancer survivors in California.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Approximately 100,000 Californians are diagnosed with cancer each year, and the majority of these people require chemotherapy. While cancer chemotherapy is often life saving, it also causes a debilitating neurocognitive syndrome characterized by impaired attention, concentration, information processing speed, multitasking and memory. As a result, many cancer survivors find themselves unable to return to work or function in their lives as they had before their cancer therapy. These cognitive deficits, colloquially known as "chemobrain" or "chemofog" are long-lasting; for example, cognitive deficits have been demonstrated in breast cancer survivors treated with chemotherapy even 20 years later. With increasing cancer survival rates, the number of people living with cognitive disability from chemotherapy is growing and includes well over a million Californians. Presently, there is no known therapy for chemotherapy-induced cognitive decline, and physicians can only offer symptomatic treatment with medications such as psychostimulants. The underlying cause of "chemobrain" is damage to neural stem and precursor cell populations. The proposed project may result in an effective regenerative strategy to restore damaged neural precursor cell populations and ameliorate or cure the cognitive syndrome caused by chemotherapy. The benefit to California in terms of improved quality of life for cancer survivors and restored occupational productivity would be immeasurable.
Progress Report: 
  • Cancer chemotherapy can be lifesaving but frequently results in long-term cognitive deficits. This project seeks to establish a regenerative strategy for chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction by harnessing the potential of the interactions between active neurons and glial precursor cells that promote myelin plasticity in the healthy brain. In the first year of this award, we have made on-track progress towards establishing a working experimental model system of chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity that faithfully models the human disease both in terms of the cellular damage as well as functional deficits in cognition. We have also been able to identify several therapeutic candidate molecules that we will be studying in the coming years of the project to ascertain which of these candidates are sufficient to promote OPC population repletion and neuro-regeneration after chemotherapy exposure.
Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05606
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 623 251
Disease Focus: 
Spinal Cord Injury
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Transplantation of neuronal precursors into the central nervous system offers great promise for the treatment of neurological disorders including spinal cord injury (SCI). Among the most significant consequences of SCI are bladder spasticity and neuropathic pain, both of which likely result from a reduction in those spinal inhibitory mechanisms that are essential for normal bladder and sensory functions. Our preliminary data show that embryonic inhibitory neuron precursor cells integrate in the adult nervous system and increase inhibitory network activity. Therefore inhibitory nerve cell transplants could be a powerful way to establish new inhibitory circuits in the injured spinal cord that will reduce bladder spasticity and attenuate central neuropathic pain. We already have proof-of-principle data that murine inhibitory nerve cells integrate in the adult spinal cord and improve symptoms in an animal model of chronic spinal cord injury. We have also recently developed methods to create human inhibitory interneurons from embryonic stem cells. This proposal will capitalize on these recent developments and determine whether our human embryonic stem cell-derived inhibitory cells can be successfully transplanted into the grey matter of the injured spinal cord and reduce neurogenic bladder dysfunction and neuropathic pain, two major causes of suffering in chronic SCI patients. If successful, our studies will lay the groundwork for a potential novel therapy for chronic SCI.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
There are an estimated 260,000 individuals in the United States who currently live with disability associated with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Symptoms of chronic SCI include bladder dyssynergia reflected by incontinence coincident with asynchronous contraction of internal and external sphincters, and central neuropathic pain, both of which severely impede activities of daily living, reduce quality of life, and contribute to the very high medical costs of caring for the Californians who suffer from chronic spinal cord injury. The Geron trial for SCI, as well as other cell-based approaches, aim to treat acute SCI. This proposal considers a different potentially complementary cell-transplantation strategy that is directed to more chronic SCI with the goal of improving bladder function and reducing pain. We propose to use cell grafts of inhibitory interneurons that we have derived from human stem cells in order to provide a novel treatment. If successful, we will have defined a therapeutic option that targets the most prevalent population of spinal cord injured patients. As the country's most populous state, California has the largest number of patients with chronic SCI, approximately 12,000. The estimated economic cost to California in lost productivity and medical expenses amounts to $400,000,000 annually. The potential savings in medical care costs, and improvement in quality of life will therfore have a disproportional benefit to the state of California.
Progress Report: 
  • From the past six months of work, we report considerable progress toward our aims of investigating the safety and efficacy of human inhibitory nerve precursor (MGE) cell transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury-induced bladder spasticity and neuropathic pain. Our first aim details the injection of human MGE cells into the uninjured rodent spinal cord and investigation of cell fate and potential adverse side effects from their transplantation. During the reporting period, we completed histological analyses for the two-month time point post-injection, and we found that the human MGE cells, derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), appropriately matured into forebrain-type inhibitory interneurons in the rodent spinal cord. Also, we initiated histological examination of animals six months post-injection and detected robust human cell survival, dispersal into the spinal cord grey matter, and neuronal maturation, but no evidence of tumor formation. In addition, we completed behavioral analyses of animals injected with hESC-derived MGE cells at two and six months post-injection. Thus far, we have not observed any adverse side effects when human MGE cells are transplanted into the uninjured animal as determined by measures of body weight, locomotion, bladder function, and pain sensitivity.
  • Since the beginning of this project, we report considerable progress toward our aims of investigating the safety and efficacy of human inhibitory nerve precursor (MGE) cell transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury-induced bladder spasticity and neuropathic pain. In year one of this award we completed the major objectives of Aim1, namely to explore the survival, integration, and cell fate of stem cell-derived MGE cell transplants in the uninjured rodent spinal cord. We have now obtained preliminary efficacy results from Aim 2, namely the effects of hESC-MGE cells injected in spinal cord injured animals. Behavioral testing has been obtained to assess pain thresholds for all injected animals up to the six month endpoint, and measures of bladder spasticity have been obtained at six months post cell injection. We are evaluating whether the unblinded data demonstrates amelioration of neuropathic pain and bladder spasticity. Our preliminary histological analysis shows robust human cell survival, distribution, and neuronal differentiation, and we have electrophysiological data indicating functional integration of the transplanted cells. We are on track to complete all aims by the end of the award period.
Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05603
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
Type: 
Co-PI
Institution: 
Type: 
Partner-PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$4 799 814
Disease Focus: 
Multiple Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Collaborative Funder: 
Australia
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) caused by inflammation and loss of cells that produce myelin, which normally insulates and protects nerve cells. MS is a leading cause of neurological disability among young adults in North America. Current treatments for MS include drugs such as interferons and corticosteroids that modulate the ability of immune system cells to invade the CNS. These therapies often have unsatisfactory outcomes, with continued progression of neurologic disability over time. This is most likely due to irreversible tissue injury resulting from permanent loss of myelin and nerve destruction. The limited ability of the body to repair damaged nerve tissue highlights a critically important and unmet need for MS patients. The long-term goal of our research is to develop a stem cell-based therapy that will not only halt ongoing loss of myelin but also lead to remyelination and repair of damaged nerve tissue. Our preliminary data in animal models of human MS are very promising and suggest that this goal is possible. Research efforts will concentrate on refining techniques for production and rigorous quality control of clinically-compatible transplantable cells generated from high-quality human pluripotent stem cell lines, and to verify the therapeutic activity of these cells. We will emphasize safety and development of the most therapeutically beneficial cell type for eventual use in patients with MS.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
One in seven Americans lives in California, and these people make up the single largest health care market in the United States. The diseases and injuries that affect Californians affect the rest of the US and the world. Many of these diseases involve degeneration of healthy cells and tissues, including neuronal tissue in diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The best estimates indicate that there are 400,000 people diagnosed with MS in the USA and 2.2 million worldwide. In California, there are approximately 160,000 people with MS – roughly half of MS patients in the US live in California. MS is a life-long, chronic disease diagnosed primarily in young adults who have a virtually normal life expectancy but suffer from progressive loss of motor and cognitive function. Consequently, the economic, social and medical costs associated with the disease are significant. Estimates place the annual cost of MS in the United States in the billions of dollars. The development of a stem cell therapy for treatment of MS patients will not only alleviate ongoing suffering but also allow people afflicted with this disease to return to work and contribute to the economic stabilization of California. Moreover, a stem cell-based therapy that will provide sustained recovery will reduce recurrence and the ever-growing cost burden to the California medical community.
Progress Report: 
  • The team has been highly productive during the first year of work on this award. A major goal of the project is to evaluate the efficacy of neural progenitor cell transplantation to promote remyelination following virus induced central nervous system damage. With intracranial infection by the virus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), mice develop paralysis due to immune mediated destruction of cells that generate myelin. Using protocols developed in the Loring laboratory, neural precursor cells (NPC) were derived from the human embryonic stem cell line H9. Mice developing paralysis due to intracranial infection with MHV were subject to intraspinal transplantation of these NPC, resulting in significant clinical recovery beginning at 2-3 weeks following transplant. This clinical effect of NPC transplantation remained out to six months, suggesting that these NPC are effective for long-term repair following demyelination. Despite this striking recovery, these human ES cell derived NPC were rapidly rejected. Several protocols for the generation of NPC for transplantation have been characterized, with the greatest clinical impact observed for NPC cultures bearing a high level of expression of TGF beta I and TGF beta II. These findings support the hypothesis that transplanted NPC reprogram the immune system within the central nervous system (CNS), leading to the activation of endogenous NPC and other repair mechanisms. Thus, it may not be necessary to induce complete immune suppression in order to promote remyelination and CNS repair following NPC transplantation for demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis.
Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies II
Grant Number: 
RT2-02022
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 493 928
Disease Focus: 
Parkinson's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) have the capacity to differentiate into every cell in the adult body, and they are thus a highly promising source of differentiated cells for the investigation and treatment of numerous human diseases. For example, neurodegenerative disorders are an increasing healthcare problem that affect the lives of millions of Americans, and Parkinson's Disease (PD) in particular exacts enormous personal and economic tolls. Expanding hPSCs and directing their differentiation into dopaminergic neurons, the cell type predominantly lost in PD, promises to yield cells that can be used in cell replacement therapies. However, developing technologies to create the enormous numbers of safe and healthy dopaminergic neurons required for clinical development and implementation represents a bottleneck in the field, because the current systems for expanding and differentiating hPSCs face numerous challenges including difficulty in scaling up cell production, concerns with the safety of some materials used in the current cell culture systems, and limited reproducibility of such systems. An emerging principle in stem cell engineering is that basic advances in stem cell biology can be translated towards the creation of “synthetic stem cell niches” that emulate the properties of natural microenvironments and tissues. We have made considerable progress in engineering bioactive materials to support hESC expansion and dopaminergic differentiation. For example, basic knowledge of how hESCs interact with the matrix that surrounds them has led to progress in synthetic, biomimetic hydrogels that have biochemical and mechanical properties to support hESC expansion. Furthermore, biology often presents biochemical signals that are patterned or structured at the nanometer scale, and our application of materials chemistry has yielded synthetic materials that imitate the nanostructured properties of endogenous ligands and thereby promise to enhance the potency of growth factors and morphogens for cell differentiation. We propose to build upon this progress to create general platforms for hPSC expansion and differentiation through two specific aims: 1) To determine whether a fully defined, three dimensional (3D) synthetic matrix for expanding immature hPSCs can rapidly and scaleably generate large cell numbers for subsequent differentiation into potentially any cell , and 2) To investigate whether a 3D, synthetic matrix can support differentiation into healthy, implantable human DA neurons in high quantities and yields. This blend of stem cell biology, neurobiology, materials science, and bioengineering to create “synthetic stem cell niche” technologies with broad applicability therefore addresses critical challenges in regenerative medicine.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This proposal will develop novel tools and capabilities that will strongly enhance the scientific, technological, and economic development of stem cell therapeutics in California. The most important net benefit will be for the treatment of human diseases. Efficiently expanding immature hPSCs in a scaleable, safe, and economical manner is a greatly enabling capability that would impact many downstream medical applications. The development of platforms for scaleable and safe cell differentiation will benefit therapeutic efforts for Parkinson’s Disease. Furthermore, the technologies developed in this proposal are designed to be tunable, such that they can be readily adapted to numerous downstream applications. The resulting technologies have strong potential to benefit human health. Furthermore, this proposal directly addresses several research targets of this RFA – the development and validation of stem cell scale-up technologies including novel cell expansion methods and bioreactors for both human pluripotent cells and differentiated cell types – indicating that CIRM believes that the proposed capabilities are a priority for California’s stem cell effort. While the potential applications of the proposed technology are broad, we will apply it to a specific and urgent biomedical problem: developing systems for generating clinically relevant quantities of dopaminergic neurons from hPSCs, part of a critical path towards developing therapies for Parkinson’s disease. This proposal would therefore work towards developing capabilities that are critical for hPSC-based regenerative medicine applications in the nervous system to clinically succeed. The principal investigator and co-investigator have a strong record of translating basic science and engineering into practice through interactions with industry, particularly within California. Finally, this collaborative project will focus diverse research groups with many students on an important interdisciplinary project at the interface of science and engineering, thereby training future employees and contributing to the technological and economic development of California.
Progress Report: 
  • Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) have the capacity to differentiate into every cell in the adult body, and they are thus a highly promising source of differentiated cells for the investigation and treatment of numerous human diseases. For example, neurodegenerative disorders are an increasing healthcare problem that affect the lives of millions of Americans, and Parkinson's Disease (PD) in particular exacts enormous personal and economic tolls. Expanding hPSCs and directing their differentiation into dopaminergic neurons, the cell type predominantly lost in PD, promises to yield cells that can be used in cell replacement therapies. However, developing technologies to create the enormous numbers of safe and healthy dopaminergic neurons required for clinical development and implementation represents a bottleneck in the field, because the current systems for expanding and differentiating hPSCs face numerous challenges including difficulty in scaling up cell production, concerns with the safety of some materials used in the current cell culture systems, and limited reproducibility of such systems.
  • This project has two central aims: 1) To determine whether a fully defined, three dimensional (3D) synthetic matrix for expanding immature hPSCs can rapidly and scaleably generate large cell numbers for subsequent differentiation into potentially any cell , and 2) To investigate whether a 3D, synthetic matrix can support differentiation into healthy, implantable human DA neurons in high quantities and yields. In the first year of this project, we have made progress in both aims. Specifically, we are conducting high throughput studies to optimize matrix properties in aim 1, and we have developed a material formulation in aim 2 that supports a level of DA differentiation that we are now beginning to optimize with a high throughput approach.
  • This blend of stem cell biology, neurobiology, materials science, and bioengineering to create “synthetic stem cell niche” technologies with broad applicability therefore addresses critical challenges in regenerative medicine.
  • Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) have the capacity to differentiate into every cell in the adult body, and they are thus a highly promising source of differentiated cells for the investigation and treatment of numerous human diseases. For example, neurodegenerative disorders are an increasing healthcare problem that affect the lives of millions of Americans, and Parkinson's Disease (PD) in particular exacts enormous personal and economic tolls. Expanding hPSCs and directing their differentiation into dopaminergic neurons, the cell type predominantly lost in PD, promises to yield cells that can be used in cell replacement therapies. However, developing technologies to create the enormous numbers of safe and healthy dopaminergic neurons required for clinical development and implementation represents a bottleneck in the field, because the current systems for expanding and differentiating hPSCs face numerous challenges including difficulty in scaling up cell production, concerns with the safety of some materials used in the current cell culture systems, and limited reproducibility of such systems.
  • This project has two central aims: 1) To determine whether a fully defined, three dimensional (3D) synthetic matrix for expanding immature hPSCs can rapidly and scaleably generate large cell numbers for subsequent differentiation into potentially any cell , and 2) To investigate whether a 3D, synthetic matrix can support differentiation into healthy, implantable human DA neurons in high quantities and yields. In the first year of this project, we have made progress in both aims. Specifically, we are conducting high throughput studies to optimize matrix properties in aim 1, and we have developed a material formulation in aim 2 that supports a level of DA differentiation that we are now beginning to optimize with a high throughput approach.
  • This blend of stem cell biology, neurobiology, materials science, and bioengineering to create “synthetic stem cell niche” technologies with broad applicability therefore addresses critical challenges in regenerative medicine.
  • Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) have the capacity to differentiate into every cell in the adult body, and they are thus a highly promising source of differentiated cells for the investigation and treatment of numerous human diseases. For example, neurodegenerative disorders are an increasing healthcare problem that affect the lives of millions of Americans, and Parkinson's Disease (PD) in particular exacts enormous personal and economic tolls. Expanding hPSCs and directing their differentiation into dopaminergic neurons, the cell type predominantly lost in PD, promises to yield cells that can be used in cell replacement therapies. However, developing technologies to create the enormous numbers of safe and healthy dopaminergic neurons required for clinical development and implementation represents a bottleneck in the field, because the current systems for expanding and differentiating hPSCs face numerous challenges including difficulty in scaling up cell production, concerns with the safety of some materials used in the current cell culture systems, and limited reproducibility of such systems.
  • This project has two central aims: 1) To determine whether a fully defined, three dimensional (3D) synthetic matrix for expanding immature hPSCs can rapidly and scaleably generate large cell numbers for subsequent differentiation into potentially any cell , and 2) To investigate whether a 3D, synthetic matrix can support differentiation into healthy, implantable human DA neurons in high quantities and yields. In the first year of this project, we have made progress in both aims. Specifically, we are conducting high throughput studies to optimize matrix properties in aim 1, and we have developed a material formulation in aim 2 that supports a level of DA differentiation that we are now beginning to optimize with a high throughput approach.
  • This blend of stem cell biology, neurobiology, materials science, and bioengineering to create “synthetic stem cell niche” technologies with broad applicability therefore addresses critical challenges in regenerative medicine.
Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01785-B
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 614 441
Disease Focus: 
Spinal Cord Injury
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
Injuries to the spinal cord commonly result from motor vehicle accidents, traumatic falls, diving, surfing, skiing, and snowboarding accidents, other forms of sports injuries, as well as from gunshot injuries in victims of violent crimes. Injuries to the anatomically lowest part of the spinal cord, the lumbosacral portion and its associated nerve roots commonly cause paralysis, loss of sensation, severe pain, as well as loss of bladder, bowel, and sexual function. Lumbosacral injuries represent approximately one-fifth of all traumatic lesions to the human spinal cord. As a result of the direct injury to the lumbosacral portion of the spinal cord, there is degeneration and death of spinal cord nerve cells, which control muscles in the legs as well as bladder, bowel, and sexual function. No treatments are presently available in clinical practice to reverse the effects of these devastating injuries. In order to reverse the loss of function after lumbosacral spinal cord injury, replacement of the lost nerve cells is required. Recent research studies have identified some properties that are shared by spinal cord neurons responsible for muscle and bladder control. Human embryonic stem cells can now be prepared in research laboratories to develop properties that are shared between nerve cells controlling muscle and bladder function. Such nerve cells are particularly at risk of degeneration and death as a result of injuries to the lumbosacral spinal cord. Human embryonic stem cells, which have undergone treatment to obtain properties of muscle and bladder controlling nerve cells, are now very attractive development candidates for new cell replacement therapies after lumbosacral spinal cord injuries. The proposed feasibility studies will study the properties of such cells in a clinically relevant rat model for lumbosacral spinal cord injuries. In Specific Aim 1, we will determine whether ACUTE transplantation of human embryonic stem cells, which have been treated to develop properties of specific lumbosacral spinal cord neurons, may replace lost nerve cells and result in a return of bladder function in a rat model of lumbosacral spinal cord injury and repair. In Specific Aim 2, we will determine whether DELAYED transplantation of human embryonic stem cells, which have been treated to develop properties of specific lumbosacral spinal cord neurons, may replace lost nerve cells and result in a return of bladder function in a rat model of lumbosacral spinal cord injury and repair. A variety of functional studies will determine the effect of the cell transplantation on bladder function, walking, and pain. We will also use detailed anatomical studies to determine in microscopes whether the transplanted cells have grown processes to connect with pelvic target tissues, including the lower urinary tract. If successful, the proposed experiments may lead to a new treatment strategy for patients with lumbosacral spinal cord injuries.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
There are presently about 250,000 patients living with neurological impairments from spinal cord injuries (SCIs) in the United States, and approximately 11,000 new cases present every year. SCIs typically result in paralysis, loss of sensation, pain as well as bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction. No successful treatments are available to reverse the neurological deficits that result from SCI. Common causes for SCIs include car and motorcycle accidents, skiing, diving, surfing, and snow boarding injuries, traumatic falls, sports injuries, and acts of violence. California medical centers encounter a large proportion of the overall cases in the U.S. because of our large population, extensive network of freeways, and an active life style with recreational activities taking place both along the Californian coastline and in the mountains. The proposed development candidate feasibility project will capitalize on recent progress in human stem cell science and surgical repair of conus medullaris/cauda equina (CM/CE) forms of SCI. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons and neuronal progenitors, which express the transcription factor Hb9, will be transplanted into the conus medullaris in attempts to replace lost motor and autonomic neurons after a lumbosacral ventral root avulsion injury in rats. Surgical replantation of avulsed lumbosacral ventral roots into the spinal cord will also be performed in this clinically relevant model for CM/CE injury and repair. If successful, our development candidate may reinnervate muscles and pelvic organs, including the lower urinary tract after CM/CE forms of SCI. Return of functional bladder control represents one of the absolute top priorities among the spinal cord injured population (Anderson, J Neurotrauma, 2004; 21, 1371-83). Successful recovery of bladder function after SCI is expected to have very significant impact on the quality of life of spinal cord injured subjects and markedly reduce health care costs. Recovery of bladder function in spinal cord injured subjects would markedly reduce or eliminate the need for intermittent bladder catheterizations and indwelling bladder catheters. The number of visits in physicians’ offices and already over-crowded California emergency rooms for bladder infections and other complications would be markedly reduced, thereby significantly reducing health care costs for both patients and our state. Improved neurological function among the SCI population is also expected to reduce care giver needs, thereby further reducing health care costs. The increased independence that will result from improved bladder control and concomitant possible recovery of other neurological functions, for instance in transfers and locomotion, will promote return to and participation in the work force for many individuals with SCI. These effects are also expected to bring a very positive effect to the California economy and increased quality of life for those living with an SCI.
Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01785-A
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 614 441
Disease Focus: 
Spinal Cord Injury
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Injuries to the spinal cord commonly result from motor vehicle accidents, traumatic falls, diving, surfing, skiing, and snowboarding accidents, other forms of sports injuries, as well as from gunshot injuries in victims of violent crimes. Injuries to the anatomically lowest part of the spinal cord, the lumbosacral portion and its associated nerve roots commonly cause paralysis, loss of sensation, severe pain, as well as loss of bladder, bowel, and sexual function. Lumbosacral injuries represent approximately one-fifth of all traumatic lesions to the human spinal cord. As a result of the direct injury to the lumbosacral portion of the spinal cord, there is degeneration and death of spinal cord nerve cells, which control muscles in the legs as well as bladder, bowel, and sexual function. No treatments are presently available in clinical practice to reverse the effects of these devastating injuries. In order to reverse the loss of function after lumbosacral spinal cord injury, replacement of the lost nerve cells is required. Recent research studies have identified some properties that are shared by spinal cord neurons responsible for muscle and bladder control. Human embryonic stem cells can now be prepared in research laboratories to develop properties that are shared between nerve cells controlling muscle and bladder function. Such nerve cells are particularly at risk of degeneration and death as a result of injuries to the lumbosacral spinal cord. Human embryonic stem cells, which have undergone treatment to obtain properties of muscle and bladder controlling nerve cells, are now very attractive development candidates for new cell replacement therapies after lumbosacral spinal cord injuries. The proposed feasibility studies will study the properties of such cells in a clinically relevant rat model for lumbosacral spinal cord injuries. In Specific Aim 1, we will determine whether ACUTE transplantation of human embryonic stem cells, which have been treated to develop properties of specific lumbosacral spinal cord neurons, may replace lost nerve cells and result in a return of bladder function in a rat model of lumbosacral spinal cord injury and repair. In Specific Aim 2, we will determine whether DELAYED transplantation of human embryonic stem cells, which have been treated to develop properties of specific lumbosacral spinal cord neurons, may replace lost nerve cells and result in a return of bladder function in a rat model of lumbosacral spinal cord injury and repair. A variety of functional studies will determine the effect of the cell transplantation on bladder function, walking, and pain. We will also use detailed anatomical studies to determine in microscopes whether the transplanted cells have grown processes to connect with pelvic target tissues, including the lower urinary tract. If successful, the proposed experiments may lead to a new treatment strategy for patients with lumbosacral spinal cord injuries.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
There are presently about 250,000 patients living with neurological impairments from spinal cord injuries (SCIs) in the United States, and approximately 11,000 new cases present every year. SCIs typically result in paralysis, loss of sensation, pain as well as bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction. No successful treatments are available to reverse the neurological deficits that result from SCI. Common causes for SCIs include car and motorcycle accidents, skiing, diving, surfing, and snow boarding injuries, traumatic falls, sports injuries, and acts of violence. California medical centers encounter a large proportion of the overall cases in the U.S. because of our large population, extensive network of freeways, and an active life style with recreational activities taking place both along the Californian coastline and in the mountains. The proposed development candidate feasibility project will capitalize on recent progress in human stem cell science and surgical repair of conus medullaris/cauda equina (CM/CE) forms of SCI. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons and neuronal progenitors, which express the transcription factor Hb9, will be transplanted into the conus medullaris in attempts to replace lost motor and autonomic neurons after a lumbosacral ventral root avulsion injury in rats. Surgical replantation of avulsed lumbosacral ventral roots into the spinal cord will also be performed in this clinically relevant model for CM/CE injury and repair. If successful, our development candidate may reinnervate muscles and pelvic organs, including the lower urinary tract after CM/CE forms of SCI. Return of functional bladder control represents one of the absolute top priorities among the spinal cord injured population (Anderson, J Neurotrauma, 2004; 21, 1371-83). Successful recovery of bladder function after SCI is expected to have very significant impact on the quality of life of spinal cord injured subjects and markedly reduce health care costs. Recovery of bladder function in spinal cord injured subjects would markedly reduce or eliminate the need for intermittent bladder catheterizations and indwelling bladder catheters. The number of visits in physicians’ offices and already over-crowded California emergency rooms for bladder infections and other complications would be markedly reduced, thereby significantly reducing health care costs for both patients and our state. Improved neurological function among the SCI population is also expected to reduce care giver needs, thereby further reducing health care costs. The increased independence that will result from improved bladder control and concomitant possible recovery of other neurological functions, for instance in transfers and locomotion, will promote return to and participation in the work force for many individuals with SCI. These effects are also expected to bring a very positive effect to the California economy and increased quality of life for those living with an SCI.
Progress Report: 
  • Injuries to the lowest portion of the spine and the spinal cord commonly results in paralysis and impairment of bladder , bowel, and sexual functions. These injuries are usually referred to as conus medullaris and cauda equina forms of spinal cord injuries. Presently, no treatments are available to reverse the neurological deficits that result from these injuries.
  • In this project, we aim to reverse neurological deficits, including bladder function, in a rat model of spinal cord injury, which affects the lowermost portion of the spinal cord. This part of the spinal cord and the associated nerve roots are called the conus medullaris and cauda equina. In our experimental model, nerve roots carrying fibers that control muscle function and pelvic organs, such as the bladder and bowel, are injured at the surface of the spinal cord. This injury mimics many of the neurological deficits encountered in human cases.
  • For treatment purposes, we transplant human derived embryonic stem cells, which have been prepared to acquire properties of motor neurons, into the lowermost portion of the rat spinal cord after injury and surgical repair of nerve roots carrying motor fibers. The studies will evaluate both acute and delayed transplantation of human embryonoic
  • During the first year of the studies, we have developed improved protocols to increase our ability to produce large number of motor neurons from human embryonic stem cells. We have also developed improved methods to detect motor neurons during the neuron production process by using fluorescent reporters inside of the cells. The latter development is of great help when sorting and preparing cells with desired properties for transplantation studies. In addition, we have refined our surgical methods to make it less invasive, using a one-sided injury model instead of lesions on both sides of the spinal cord in rats. Specifically, bladder dysfunction can be assess after a one sided injury of nerve roots and be evaluated using a combination of bladder pressure recorings and electrical recordings referred to as electromyography (EMG) from muscles along the urethra. The revised procedure is well tolerated by the rats and is a suitable approach for studies of chronic injury and cell-based long-term treatments. A research manuscript describing this improved experimental method and refinement has been submitted to a scientific journal and reviewed, and the manuscript is currently undergoing our revisions before being considered for publication. The experimental refinement will greatly assist with our long-term studies on the effects of transplanted motor neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells. We have also begun experiments using our refined model and cells, which now can be produced in high numbers and be identifiable during both the cell culture steps and during the animal studies. Initial tissues have been harvested and are being processed for morphological analyses.
  • Injuries to the lowest portion of the spine and the spinal cord commonly results in paralysis and impairment of bladder , bowel, and sexual functions. These injuries are usually referred to as conus medullaris and cauda equina forms of spinal cord injuries. Presently, no treatments are available to reverse the neurological deficits that result from these injuries.
  • In this project, we aim to reverse neurological deficits, including bladder function, in a rat model of spinal cord injury, which affects the lowermost portion of the spinal cord. This part of the spinal cord and the associated nerve roots are called the conus medullaris and cauda equina. In our experimental model, nerve roots carrying fibers that control muscle function and pelvic organs, such as the bladder and bowel, are injured at the surface of the spinal cord. This injury mimics many of the neurological deficits encountered in human cases.
  • For treatment purposes, we transplant human derived embryonic stem cells, which have been prepared to acquire properties of motor neurons, into the lowermost portion of the rat spinal cord after injury and surgical repair of nerve roots carrying motor fibers. The studies will evaluate both acute and delayed transplantation of human embryonic stem cells, which have acquired properties of motor neurons.
  • During the second year of the studies, we have developed improved protocols to increase our ability to produce large number of motor neurons from human embryonic stem cells. We have also developed improved methods to detect motor neurons during the neuron production process by using fluorescent reporters inside of the cells. The latter development is of great help when sorting and preparing cells with desired properties for transplantation studies. In addition, we have refined our surgical methods to make it less invasive, using a one-sided injury model instead of lesions on both sides of the spinal cord in rats. Specifically, bladder dysfunction can be assessed after a one sided injury of nerve roots and be evaluated using a combination of bladder pressure recordings and electrical recordings referred to as electromyography (EMG) from muscles along the urethra. The revised procedure is well tolerated by the rats and is a suitable approach for studies of chronic injury and cell-based long-term treatments. A research manuscript describing this improved experimental method and refinement has been published. The experimental refinement will greatly assist with our long-term studies on the effects of transplanted motor neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells. We have also performed transplantations of embryonic human stem cell derived motor neurons into the rat spinal cord and demonstrated surgical feasibility as well as survival of large numbers of neurons in the rat spinal cord. Some of the transplanted cells also demonstrate anatomical markers for motor neurons after transplantation.
  • During the reporting period, we have contined to demonstrate that human embryonic stem cell derived motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors can be produced in vitro. These motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors are transplanted into the rat spinal cord after a lumbosacral ventral root avulsion injury and repair of injured roots in the form of surgical re-attachment of the roots to the spinal cord surface. The lumbosacral ventral root avulsion injury mimics cauda equina and conus medullaris forms of spinal cord injury, an underserved patient population with paralysis of the legs and loss of bladder and bowel funcion. In this clinically relevant injury and repair model in rats, we have during the past several months demonstrated that transplanted human embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors are able to survive in the spinal cord of rats over extended periods of time with large numbers of neurons being detectable in the spinal cord grey matter at 1, 2, and 10 weeks after the injury, surgical root repair, and transplantation of the cells. The long term viability of translanted cells suggests integration of the transplanted cells in the host tissues. Some of the cells show expression of motor neuron markers, such as the transcription factor Hb9, as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and light microscopy.
  • Additional studies have been performed during this reporting period to address whether the transplanted cells may extend axons into the replanted lumbosacral ventral roots. Interestingly, many human axons were detected in the replanted ventral roots using immunohistochemitry and light microscopy for the detection of human processes. Additional immunohistochemistry demonstrated that these processes contained neurofilaments, which are characteristic for axons. In control experiments, we showed that avulsed roots, which had not been replanted into the spinal cord, did not exhibit any human axons. As expected, surgical reconnection of lesioned ventral roots to the spinal cord is needed in order for the axons of the transplanted human embryonic stem cell derived motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors to be extended into avulsed ventral roots. Furthermore, in a series of sham operated animals without ventral root lesions, human motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors were also transplanted into the rat spinal cord. Interestingly, the transplanted human motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors were here also able to extend axons into ventral roots, even though the ventral roots had never been lesions. We conclude that transplanted human embryonic stem cell derived motor neurons are capable of extending axons into both intact ventrl roots and into ventral roots, which had been avulsed and surgically reattached to the spinal cord using a replantation procedure.
  • In functional studies, we have performed urodynamic studies and voiding behavioral studies in rats after the transplantation of human embryonic stem cell derived motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors. These studies are still ongoing with additional experiments being performed. However, preliminary studies suggest that the combination of acute repair of avulsed ventral roots and cell transplantation results in a gradual improvement of voiding reflexes. Ongoing studies are addressing the relative contribution that may be provided by the replantation of avulsed ventral roots and by the transplantation of human motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors into the rat spinal cord.
Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies III
Grant Number: 
RT3-07800
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
Type: 
Co-PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 380 557
Disease Focus: 
Parkinson's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Vision Loss
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
Public Abstract: 
Cell replacement therapies (CRTs) have considerable promise for addressing unmet medical needs, including incurable neurodegerative diseases. However, several bottlenecks hinder CRTs, especially the needs for improved cell manufacturing processes and enhanced cell survival and integration after implantation. Engineering synthetic biomaterials that present biological signals to support cell expansion, differentiation, survival, and/or integration may help overcome these bottlenecks. Our prior work has successfully generated synthetic biomaterial platforms for the long-term expansion of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) at large scale, efficient differentiation of hPSCs into dopaminergic progenitors and neurons for treating Parkinson’s Disease, and modulation of stem cell function to promote neuronal differentiation within the brain. We now propose to advance this work and engineer two synthetic biomaterial platforms to treat neurodegenerative disease, in particular Parkinson’s Disease and Retinitis Pigmentosa. Specifically, our central goals are to further engineer biomaterial systems for scalable hPSC differentiation into dopaminergic and photoreceptor neurons, and to engineer a second biomaterial system as a biocompatible delivery vehicle to enhance the survival and engraftment of dopaminergic and photoreceptor neurons in disease models. The resulting modular, tunable platforms will have broad implications for other cell replacement therapies to treat human disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This proposal addresses critical translational bottlenecks to stem cell therapies that are identified in the RFA, including the development of fully defined, xenobiotic free cell manufacturing systems and the development of clinically relevant technologies to enhance the survival and integration of human stem cell therapies. The proposed platform technologies for expanding and differentiating pluripotent stem cells in a scaleable, reproducible, safe, and economical manner will initially be developed for treating two major neurodegenerative disorders - Parkinson’s Disease and Retinitis Pigmentosa - that affect the well-being of hundreds of thousands of Californians and Americans. In addition, the biomaterial platforms are designed to be modular, such that they can be re-tuned towards other target cells to even more broadly enable cell replacement therapies and enhance our healthcare. This work will thus strongly enhance the scientific, technological, and economic development of stem cell therapeutics in California. Furthermore, the principal investigator has a strong record of translating basic science and engineering towards clinical development within industry, particularly within California. Finally, this collaborative project will focus research groups with many students on an important interdisciplinary project at the interface of science and engineering, thereby training future employees and contributing to the technological and economic development of California.
Funding Type: 
hPSC Repository
Grant Number: 
IR1-06600
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$9 999 834
Disease Focus: 
Developmental Disorders
Heart Disease
Infectious Disease
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Autism
Respiratory Disorders
Vision Loss
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Critical to the long term success of the CIRM iPSC Initiative of generating and ensuring the availability of high quality disease-specific human IPSC lines is the establishment and successful operation of a biorepository with proven methods for quality control, safe storage and capabilities for worldwide distribution of high quality, highly-characterized iPSCs. Specifically the biorepository will be responsible for receipt, expansion, quality characterization, safe storage and distribution of human pluripotent stem cells generated by the CIRM stem cell initiative. This biobanking resource will ensure the availability of the highest quality hiPSC resources for researchers to use in disease modeling, target discovery and drug discovery and development for prevalent, genetically complex diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients and subsequently, the ability to differentiate these iPSCs into disease-relevant cell types holds great promise in facilitating the “disease-in-a-dish” approach for studying our understanding of the pathological mechanisms of human disease. iPSCs have already proven to be a useful model for several monogenic diseases such as Parkinson’s, Fragile X Syndrome, Schizophrenia, Spinal Muscular Atrophy, and inherited metabolic diseases such as 1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial hypercholesterolemia, and glycogen storage disease. In addition, the differentiated cells obtained from iPSCs represent a renewable, disease-relevant cell model for high-throughput drug screening and toxicology/safety assessment which will ultimately lead to the successful development of new therapeutic agents. iPSCs also hold great hope for advancing the use of live cells as therapies for correcting the physiological manifestations caused by disease or injury.
Progress Report: 
  • The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Biorepository is operated by the Coriell Institute for Medical Research and is a critical component of the CIRM Human Stem Cell Initiative. The overall goal of this initiative is to generate, for world-wide use by non-profit and for-profit entities, high quality, disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). These cells are derived from existing tissues such as blood or skin, and are genetically manipulated in the laboratory to change into cells that resemble embryonic stem cells. iPSCs can be grown indefinitely in the Petri dish and have the remarkable capability to be converted into most of the major cell types in the body including neurons, heart cells, and liver cells. This ability makes iPSCs an exceptional resource for disease modeling as well as for drug screening. The expectation is that these cells will be a major benefit to the process for understanding prevalent, genetically complex diseases and in developing innovative therapeutics.
  • The Coriell CIRM iPSC Biorepository, located at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, CA, is funded through a competitive grant award to Coriell from CIRM and is managed by Mr. Matt Self under the supervision of the Program Director, Dr. Steven Madore, Director of Molecular Biology at Coriell. The Biorepository will receive biospecimens consisting of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and skin biopsies obtained from donors recruited by seven Tissue Collector grant awardees. These biospecimens will serve as the starting material for iPSC derivation by Cellular Dynamics, Inc (CDI). Under a contractual agreement with Coriell, CDI will expand each iPSC line to generate sufficient aliquots of high quality cryopreserved cells for distribution via the Coriell on-line catalogue. Aliquots of frozen cell lines and iPSCs will be stored in liquid nitrogen vapor in storage units at the Buck Institute with back-up aliquots stored in a safe off-site location.
  • Renovation and construction of the Biorepository began at the Buck Institute in late January. The Biorepository Manger was hired March 1 and after installation of cryogenic storage vessels and alarm validation, the first biospecimens were received on April 30, 2014. Additionally, Coriell has developed a Clinical Information Management System (CIMS) for storing all clinical and demographic data associated with enrolled subjects. Tissue Collectors utilize CIMS via a web interface to upload and edit the subject demographic and clinical information that will ultimately be made available, along with the iPSCs, via Coriell’s on-line catalogue
  • As of November 1 specimens representing a total of 725 unique individuals have been received at the Biorepository. These samples include PBMCs obtained from 550 unique individuals, skin biopsies from 72 unique individuals, and 103 primary dermal fibroblast cultures previously prepared in the laboratories of the CIRM Tissue Collectors. A total of 280 biospecimen samples have been delivered to CDI for the purpose of iPSC derivation. The Biorepository is anticipating delivery of the first batches of iPSCs for distribution in early 2015. These lines, along with the associated clinical data, will become available to scientists via the on-line Coriell catalogue. The CIRM Coriell iPSC Biorepository will ensure safe long-term storage and distribution of high quality iPSCs.

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