Neurological Disorders

Coding Dimension ID: 
303
Coding Dimension path name: 
Neurological Disorders

Assessing the mechanism by which the Bone Morphogenetic Proteins direct stem cell fate

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-07320
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$598 367
Disease Focus: 
Spinal Cord Injury
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Our goal is to use the mechanisms that generate neuronal networks to create neurons from stem cells, to either replace diseased and damaged tissue or as a source of material to study disease mechanisms. A key focus of such regenerative studies is to restore function to the spinal cord, which is particularly vulnerable to damage. However, although considerable progress has been made in understanding how to direct stem cells towards motor neurons that control coordinated movement, little progress has been made so far directing stem cells to form the sensory neurons that allow us to experience the environment around us. Our proposed research will use insights from the mechanisms known to generate the sensory neurons during the development of the spinal cord, to derive these neurons from stem cells. We will initially use mouse embryonic stem cells in these studies, to accelerate the experimental progress. We will then apply our findings to human embryonic stem cells, and assess whether these cells are competent to repopulate the spinal cord. These studies will significantly advance our understanding of how to generate the full repertoire of neural subtypes necessary to repair the spinal cord after injury, specifically permitting patients to recover sensations such as pain and temperature. Moreover, they also represent a source of therapeutically beneficial cells for modeling debilitating diseases, such as the chronic insensitivity to pain.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Millions of Californians live with compromised nervous systems, damaged by either traumatic injury or disease. These conditions can be devastating, stripping patients of their ability to move, feel and think, and currently have no cure. As well as being debilitating for patients, living with these diseases is also extremely expensive, costing both Californians and the state of California many billions of dollars. For example, the estimated lifetime cost for a single individual managing spinal paralysis is estimated to be up to $3 million. Stem cell technology offers tremendous hope for reversing or ameliorating both disease and injury states. Stem cells can be used to replenish any tissue damaged by injury or disease, including the spinal cord, which is particularly vulnerable to physical damage. Our proposed studies will develop the means to produce the spinal sensory neurons that permit us to perceive the environment. We will also determine whether these in vitro derived sensory neurons are suitable for transplantation back into the spinal cord. The generation of these neurons will constitute an important step towards reversing or ameliorating spinal injuries, and thereby improve the productivity and quality of life of many Californians. Moreover, progress in this field will solidify the leadership role of California in stem cell research and stimulate the future growth of the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries within the state.
Progress Report: 
  • A promising strategy to treat neurodegenerative diseases is to use embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived neurons to replace damaged or diseased populations of neurons. In our CIRM-funded studies, we proposed to establish a protocol that will derive spinal sensory interneurons (INs) from ESCs. These INs are required to reestablish the sensory connections that would allow an injured patient to perceive external stimuli, such as pain and temperature. The existence of in vitro derived spinal sensory INs would also accelerate studies examining the basis of debilitating spinal dysfunctions, such as congenital pain insensitivity.
  • We have made significant progress towards this goal in year 1. We have identified that specific members of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) family can direct mouse ESCs towards specific classes of spinal INs. These signals appear to be evolutionally conserved: our preliminary results suggest that BMPs have the same activity directing human ESCs towards spinal sensory IN fates. We are thus well poised to initiate our proposed studies in year 2: assessing whether stem cell derived INs can integrate in the spinal cord.

Alpha Stem Cell Clinic for the Development of Regenerative Therapies

Funding Type: 
Alpha Stem Cell Clinics
Grant Number: 
AC1-07764
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$8 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Diabetes
Spinal Cord Injury
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Adult Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Adult Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
The proposed alpha clinic will bring together an outstanding team of physician-scientists with substantial clinical trials experience including stem cell and other cellular treatments of blood diseases and others. This team will also draw on our unique regional competitive advantages derived from our history of extensive collaboration with investigators at many nearby first-class research institutions and biotech companies. We propose to include these regional assets in our plans to translate our successful research on basic properties of stem cells to stem cell clinical trials and ultimately to delivery of effective and novel therapies. We propose to build an alpha clinic that serves the stem cell clinical trial needs of our large region where we are the only major academic health center with the needed expertise to establish a high impact alpha clinic. Our infrastructure will initially be developed and then used to support two major high-impact stem cell clinical trials: one in type I diabetes and one in spinal cord injury. Both are collaborations with established and well known companies. The type I diabetes trial will test embryonic stem cell derived cells that differentiate to become the missing beta cells of the pancreas. The cells are contained in a semipermeable bag that has inherent safety because of restriction of cell migration while allowing proper control of insulin levels in response to blood sugar. These hybrid devices are implanted just beneath the skin in patients in these trials. In a second trial of stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury, neuronal stem cells that have been shown to have substantial safety and efficacy in animal models of spinal cord injury and other types of spinal cord trauma or disease will be tested in human patients with chronic spinal cord injury. Both of these trials have the potential to have very substantial and important impact on patients with these diseases and the families and society that supports them. Following on these two trials, we are planning stem cell clinical trials for heart failure, cancer, ALS, and other terrible deadly disorders. Our proposed alpha clinic also benefits from very substantial leveraged institutional commitments, which will allow for an alpha clinic that is sustainable well beyond the five-year grant, which is essential to continue to manage the patients who have participated in the first trials being planned since multi-year followup and tracking is essential scientifically and ethically. We have a plan for our proposed alpha clinic to be sustainable to 10 years and beyond to the point at which these therapies if successful will be delivered to patients in our healthcare system.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Many terrible diseases that afflict the citizens of California and cause substantial economic and emotional disruption to California families can potentially be treated with novel stem cell therapies. These therapies need to be tested in a rigorous and unbiased fashion in clinical trials, which is the focus of our proposed alpha clinic. Our clinic proposes to begin with clinical trials in two major diseases in need of improved treatment: type I diabetes and spinal cord injuries. The type I diabetes clinical trial will test a novel hybrid embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic cell/encapsulation technology that is implanted just beneath the skin in an out-patient procedure, and is inherently safe because the cells are confined to a semi-permeable bag. The spinal cord injury trial will test the benefit of neural stem cells delivered to the site of injury. Both have substantial positive evidence in animal models and have the potential of leading to major breakthroughs. In addition to providing the infrastructure for these two trials, our proposed alpha clinic will also take advantage of very substantial regional expertise at our partner institutions to test stem cells in other diseases of importance in California including heart failure, ALS, cancer, and many others. Our proposed alpha clinic will also be a major economic as well as medical driver as it leverages substantial institutional and private sector commitment, and has the potential to deliver breakthrough therapies that will be marketed either in a health care system or by private sector companies.

Optimizing the differentiation and expansion of microglial progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells for the study and treatment of neurological disease.

Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies III
Grant Number: 
RT3-07893
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 147 596
Disease Focus: 
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Collaborative Funder: 
Australia
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
Microglia are a type of immune cell within the brain that profoundly influence the development and progression of many neurological disorders. Microglia also inherently migrate toward areas of brain injury, making them excellent candidates for use in cell transplantation therapies. Despite the widely accepted importance of microglia in neurological disease, methods to produce microglia from stem cells have yet to be reported. Our team has recently developed one of the first protocols to generate microglia from human pluripotent stem cells. We have used several approaches to confirm that the resulting cells are microglia including examination of gene expression and testing of key microglial functions. However, our current protocol uses cell culture supplements that preclude the use of these cells for any future clinical applications in people. The major goal of this proposal is to resolve this problem. We will generate pluripotent human stem cells that have special "reporter" genes that make the cells glow as they become microglia, allowing us to readily monitor and quantify the generation of these important cells. Using these reporter lines we can then streamline the differentiation process and develop improved protocols that could be translated toward eventual clinical use. As a proof-of-principle experiment we will then use the resulting human microglia to study some important questions about the genetic causes and potential treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Recent estimates suggest that nearly 2 million Californian adults are currently living with a neurological disorder. While the causes of neurological disease vary widely from Alzheimer’s disease to Stroke to Traumatic Brain Injury, a type of brain cell called microglia has been strongly implicated in all of these disorders. Microglia are often considered the immune cell of the brain, but they play many additional roles in the development and function of the nervous system. In neurological disease, Microglia appear to be involved in a response to injury but they can also secrete factors that exacerbate neurological impairment. Unfortunately, it has been difficult to study human microglia and their role in these diseases because of challenges in producing these cells. Our group recently developed an approach to ‘differentiate’ microglia from human pluripotent stem cells. This enables researchers to now study the role of different genes in human microglial function and disease. Yet our current approach dose not allow these cells to be used for potential clinical testing in patients. Our proposal therefore aims to develop new tools and technology that will allow us to produce clinically-relevant human microglia. These cells will then be used to study the role of a specific microglial gene in Alzheimer’s disease, and may ultimately be useful for developing treatments for the many Californians suffering from neurological disease.

Restoration of memory in Alzheimer’s disease: a new paradigm using neural stem cell therapy

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Development - Research
Grant Number: 
DR2A-05416
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$20 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, results in profound loss of memory and cognitive function, and ultimately death. In the US, someone develops AD every 69 seconds and there are over 5 million individuals suffering from AD, including approximately 600,000 Californians. Current treatments do not alter the disease course. The absence of effective therapies coupled with the sheer number of affected patients renders AD a medical disorder of unprecedented need and a public health concern of significant magnitude. In 2010, the global economic impact of dementias was estimated at $604 billion, a figure far beyond the costs of cancer or heart disease. These numbers do not reflect the devastating social and emotional tolls that AD inflicts upon patients and their families. Efforts to discover novel and effective treatments for AD are ongoing, but unfortunately, the number of active clinical studies is low and many traditional approaches have failed in clinical testing. An urgent need to develop novel and innovative approaches to treat AD is clear. We propose to evaluate the use of human neural stem cells as a potential innovative therapy for AD. AD results in neuronal death and loss of connections between surviving neurons. The hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory, is particularly affected in AD, and is thought to underlie the memory problems AD patients encounter. Evidence from animal studies shows that transplanting human neural stem cells into the hippocampus improves memory, possibly by providing growth factors that protect neurons from degeneration. Translating this approach to humans could markedly restore memory and thus, quality of life for patients. The Disease Team has successfully initiated three clinical trials involving transplantation of human neural stem cells for neurological disorders. These trials have established that the cells proposed for this therapeutic approach are safe for transplantation into humans. The researchers in this Disease Team have shown that AD mice show a dramatic improvement in memory skills following both murine and human stem cell transplantation. With proof-of-concept established in these studies, the Disease Team intends to conduct the animal studies necessary to seek authorization by the FDA to start testing this therapeutic approach in human patients. This project will be conducted as a partnership between a biotechnology company with unique experience in clinical trials involving neural stem cell transplantation and a leading California-based academic laboratory specializing in AD research. The Disease Team also includes expert clinicians and scientists throughout California that will help guide the research project to clinical trials. The combination of all these resources will accelerate the research, and lead to a successful FDA submission to permit human testing of a novel approach for the treatment of AD; one that could enhance memory and save lives.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The number of AD patients in the US has surpassed 5.4 million, and the incidence may triple by 2050. Roughly 1 out of every 10 patients with AD, over 550,000, is a California resident, and alarmingly, because of the large number of baby-boomers that reside in this state, the incidence is expected to more than double by 2025. Besides the personal impact of the diagnosis on the patient, the rising incidence of disease, both in the US and California, imperils the federal and state economy. The dementia induced by AD disconnects patients from their loved ones and communities by eroding memory and cognitive function. Patients gradually lose their ability to drive, work, cook, and carry out simple, everyday tasks, ultimately losing all independence. The quality of life for AD patients is hugely diminished and the burden on their families and caregivers is extremely costly to the state of California. Annual health care costs are estimated to exceed $172 billion, not including the additional costs resulting from the loss of income and physical and emotional stress experienced by caregivers of Alzheimer's patients. Given that California is the most populous state and the state with the highest number of baby-boomers, AD’s impact on California families and state finances is proportionally high and will only increase as the AD prevalence rises. Currently, there is no cure for AD and no means of prevention. Most approved therapies address only symptomatic aspects of AD and no disease-modifying approaches are currently available. By enacting Proposition 71, California voters acknowledged and supported the need to investigate the potential of novel stem cell-based therapies to treat diseases with a significant unmet medical need such as AD. In a disease like AD, any therapy that exerts even a modest impact on the patient's ability to carry out daily activities will have an exponential positive effect not only for the patients but also for their families, caregivers, and the entire health care system. We propose to evaluate the hypothesis that neural stem cell transplantation will delay the progression of AD by slowing or stabilizing loss of memory and related cognitive skills. A single, one-time intervention may be sufficient to delay progression of neuronal degeneration and preserve functional levels of memory and cognition; an approach that offers considerable cost-efficiency. The potential economic impact of this type of therapeutic research in California could be significant, and well worth the investment of this disease team proposal. Such an approach would not only reduce the high cost of care and improve the quality of life for patients, it would also make California an international leader in a pioneering approach to AD, yielding significant downstream economic benefits for the state.
Progress Report: 
  • Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, results in profound loss of memory and cognitive function, and ultimately death. In the US, someone develops AD every 69 seconds and there are over 5 million individuals suffering from AD, including approximately 600,000 Californians. Current treatments do not alter the disease course. The absence of effective therapies coupled with the sheer number of affected patients renders AD a medical disorder of unprecedented need and a public health concern of significant magnitude. In 2010, the global economic impact of dementias was estimated at $604 billion, a figure far beyond the costs of cancer or heart disease. These numbers do not reflect the devastating social and emotional tolls that AD inflicts upon patients and their families. Efforts to discover novel and effective treatments for AD are ongoing, but unfortunately, the number of active clinical studies is low and many traditional approaches have failed in clinical testing. An urgent need to develop novel and innovative approaches to treat AD is clear.
  • We have proposed to evaluate the use of human neural stem cells as a potential innovative therapy for AD. AD results in neuronal death and loss of connections between surviving neurons. The hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory, is particularly affected in AD, and is thought to underlie the memory problems AD patients encounter. Evidence from previous animal studies shows that transplanting human neural stem cells into the hippocampus improves memory, possibly by providing growth factors that protect neurons from degeneration. Translating this approach to humans could markedly restore memory and thus, quality of life for patients.
  • In the first year of the loan, the Disease Team actively worked on 5 important milestones in our effort to develop the use of human neural stem cells for AD. Of those, 2 milestones have been completed and 3 are ongoing. Specifically, the team has initiated three animal studies believed necessary to seek authorization by the FDA to start testing this therapeutic approach in human patients; these studies were designed to confirm that transplantation of the neural stem cells leads to improved memory in animal models relevant for AD. We are currently collecting and analyzing the data generated in these mouse studies. We have also identified the neural stem cell line that will be used in patients and have made considerable progress in its manufacturing and banking. Finally, we have held a pre-IND meeting with the FDA in which we shared our plans for the preclinical and clinical studies; the meeting provided helpful guidance and assurances regarding our IND enabling activities.
  • This project is a partnership between a biotechnology company with unique experience in clinical trials involving neural stem cell transplantation and a leading California-based academic laboratory specializing in AD research. Together with expert clinicians and scientists throughout California, we continue to work towards a successful IND submission to permit human testing of a novel and unique approach for the treatment of AD.
  • Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, results in profound loss of memory and cognitive function, and ultimately death. In the United States, someone develops AD every 69 seconds and there are over 5 million individuals suffering from AD, including approximately 600,000 Californians. Current treatments do not alter the disease course. The absence of effective therapies coupled with the sheer number of affected patients renders AD a medical disorder of unprecedented need and a public health concern of significant magnitude. Efforts to discover effective treatments for AD are ongoing, but unfortunately, the number of active clinical studies is low and many traditional approaches have failed in clinical testing. An urgent need to develop novel and innovative approaches to treat AD is urgent.
  • StemCells Inc., proposed to evaluate the use of human neural stem cells as a potential innovative therapy for AD. AD results in neuronal death and loss of connections between surviving neurons. The hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory, is particularly affected in AD. Evidence from previous animal studies shows that transplanting human neural stem cells into the hippocampus improves memory, possibly by providing growth factors that protect neurons from degeneration. Translating this approach to humans could markedly restore memory and thus, quality of life for patients.
  • In September 2012, the CIRM awarded a loan to StemCells Inc. to partially fund a program to test human neural stem cells in two animal models used by some researchers to study AD and the study was initiated in July of 2013. The goal of this study was chiefly to try to replicate earlier successful experiments with human neural stem cells in these mice in support of an IND filing with the U.S. FDA within four years.
  • In the first year of the study, the Disease Team actively worked on 5 important scientific milestones in our effort to develop human neural stem cells as a potential therapy for AD. We also held a pre-IND meeting with the FDA in which we shared our plans for the preclinical and clinical studies in AD; the meeting provided helpful guidance and assurances regarding our IND enabling activities.
  • As of the second year of the study, all of the first 5 scientific milestones have been completed. Specifically, the team conducted three animal studies believed necessary to start testing this therapeutic approach in human patients; these studies were designed to confirm that transplantation of the neural stem cells leads to improved memory in animal models relevant for AD.
  • Despite seeing a very exciting increase in the number of connections between key hippocampal neurons within the brains of mice treated with human neural stem cells, this did not appear to robustly and consistently improve memory in the animals. Without seeing a significant change in memory performance, the preclinical results of the study did not satisfy one or more of the specific “No/No Go” scientific milestones agreed to with the CIRM. Given this, the loan was subsequently terminated in December 2014 as a consequence of the unanticipated preclinical results.
  • This study was a partnership between a biotechnology company with unique experience in clinical trials involving neural stem cell transplantation and a leading California-based academic laboratory specializing in AD research. Although disappointing, the results of this study do not negate the potential of neural stem cell transplantation in AD; rather, having reviewed and discussed the data with our collaborators, we believe the data highlight the challenge of obtaining reliable and consistent behavior readouts of memory improvement in animals. Finally, the observed increases in the connections between hippocampal neurons are very interesting and may justify further efforts to improve pre-clinical development for this complex disorder.

Development of Single Cell MRI Technology using Genetically-Encoded Iron-Based Reporters

Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies II
Grant Number: 
RT2-02018
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 930 608
Disease Focus: 
Stroke
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Clinical application of cell transplantation therapy requires a means of non-invasively monitoring these cells in the patient. Several imaging modalities, including MRI, bioluminescence imaging, and positron emission tomography have been used to track stem cells in vivo. For MR imaging, cells are pre-loaded with molecules or particles that substantially alter the image brightness; the most common such labelling strategy employs iron oxide particles. Several studies have shown the ability of MRI to longitudinally track transplanted iron-labeled cells in different animal models, including stroke and cancer. But there are drawbacks to this kind of labeling. Division of cells will result in the dilution of particles and loss of signal. False signal can be detected from dying cells or if the cells of interest are ingested by other cells. To overcome these roadblocks in the drive toward clinical implementation of stem cell tracking, it is now believed that a genetic labeling approach will be necessary, whereby specific protein expression causes the formation of suitable contrast agents. Such endogenous and persistent generation of cellular contrast would be particularly valuable to the field of stem cell therapy, where the homing ability of transplanted stem cells, long-term viability, and capacity for differentiation are all known to strongly influence therapeutic outcomes. However, genetic labeling or "gene reporter" strategies that permit sensitive detection of rare cells, non-invasively and deep in tissue, have not yet been developed. This is therefore the translational bottleneck that we propose to address in this grant, through the development and validation of a novel high-sensitivity MRI gene reporter technology. There have been recent reports of gene-mediated cellular production of magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles of the same composition as the synthetic iron oxide particles used widely in exogenous labeling studies. It is an extension of this strategy, combined with our own strengths in developing high-sensitivity MRI technology, that we propose to apply to the task of single cell tracking of metastatic cancer cells and neural stem cells. If we are successful with the proposed studies, we will have substantially advanced the field of in vivo cellular imaging, by providing a stable cell tracking technology that could be used to study events occurring at arbitrary depth in tissue (unlike optical methods) and over unlimited time duration and arbitrary number of cell divisions (unlike conventional cellular MRI). With the ability to track not only the fate (migration, homing and proliferation) but also the viability and function of very small numbers of stem cells will come new knowledge of the behavior of these cells in a far more relevant micro-environment compared with current in vitro models, and yet with far better visualization and cell detection sensitivity compared with other in vivo imaging methods.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Stem cell therapy has enormous promise to become a viable therapy for a range of illnesses, including stroke, other cardiovascular diseases, and neurological diseases. Progress in the development of these therapies depends on the ability to monitor cell delivery, migration and therapeutic action at the disease site, using imaging and other non-invasive technologies. If breakthroughs could be made along these lines, it would not only be of enormous benefit to the citizens of the state of California, but would also greatly reduce healthcare costs. From a broader research perspective, the state of California is the front-runner in stem cell research, having gathered not only private investments, as demonstrated by the numerous biotechnology companies that are developing innovative tools, but also extensive public funds that allows the state, through CIRM, to sponsor stem cell research in public and private institutions. In order to preserve the leadership position and encourage research on stem cells, CIRM is calling for research proposals to develop innovative tools and technologies that will overcome current roadblocks in translational stem cell research. This proposal will benefit the state by providing important new technology that will be valuable for both basic and translational stem cell research. A key bottleneck to the further development and translation of new stem cell therapies is the inability to track stem cells through a human body. It is possible to image stem cells using embedded optical fluorescence labels, but optical imaging does not permit tracking of cells deep in tissue. Other imaging modalities and their associated cellular labels (for example positron emission tomography) have also been used to track cells but do not have the sensitivity to detect rare or single cells. Finally, MRI has been used to track cells deep in tissue, down to the single cell level, but only by pre-loading cells with a non-renewable supply of iron oxide nanoparticles, which prevents long-term tracking and assessment of cell viability and function. We propose here to develop MRI technology and a new form of genetically-encoded, long-term cell labeling technology, to a much more advanced state than available at present. This will make it possible to use MRI to detect and follow cancer and stem cells as they migrate to and proliferate at the site of interest, even starting from the single cell stage. This will provide a technology that will help stem cell researchers, first and foremost in California, to understand stem cell behavior in a realistic in vivo environment. This technology will be translatable to future human stem cell research studies.
Progress Report: 
  • We have made good progress in the first year. This project involves four separate scientific teams, brought together for the first time, representing diverse backgrounds ranging from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) physics and cell tracking (Dr. Rutt), microbiology (Dr. Matin), nano and magnetic characterization (Dr. Moler) and stem cell imaging in stroke models (Dr. Guzman). Substantial progress has been made by all four teams, and we are starting to see important interactions between the teams. An overall summary of progress is that we have evaluated three different bacterial genes (magA, mms6, mamB) in one mammalian cell line (MDA-MB-231BR) and have shown significant iron accumulation in vitro with two of these genes, which is a very positive result implying that these genes may have the required characteristics to act as "reporter genes" for MRI-based tracking of cells labeled with these genes. MR imaging of mouse brain specimens has yielded promising results and in vivo imaging experiments are underway at medium MRI field strength (3 Tesla). At the same time, we are ramping up our higher field, higher sensitivity MR imaging methods and will be ready to evaluate the different variations of our MR reporter gene at 7 Tesla (the highest magnetic field widely available for human MRI) in the near future. Finally, methods to perform quantitative characterization of our reporter cells are being developed, with the goal of being able to characterize magnetic properties down to the single cell level, and also to be able to assess iron loading levels down to the single level in brain tissue slices.
  • We have made good progress in the second year. This project involves four separate scientific teams, brought together for the first time for this project, representing diverse backgrounds ranging from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) physics and cell tracking (Dr. Rutt), microbiology (Dr. Matin), nano and magnetic characterization (Dr. Moler) and imaging reporter development and testing in small animal models of disease (Dr. Contag). Substantial progress has been made by all four teams, and we are starting to see important interactions between the teams.
  • An overall summary of progress is that we have been evaluating three different bacterial genes (magA, mms6, mamB) in two mammalian cell lines (MDA-MB-231BR and DAOY). In year I we had shown significant iron accumulation in vitro with two of these genes, which was a very positive result implying that these genes may have the required characteristics to act as "reporter genes" for MRI-based tracking of cells labeled with these genes. In year 2, we diversified and intensified the efforts to achieve expression of one or more of the bacterial genes in different cell lines, using different genetic constructs. We began a concerted effort to achieve optical labeling such that we could visualize the gene expression and to identify sub-cellular localization of the report gene products.
  • We obtained promising results from MR imaging of mouse brain. In vivo imaging experiments were accomplished at medium MRI field strength (3 Tesla). At the same time, we ramped up our higher field, higher sensitivity MR imaging methods and began to evaluate the sensitivity gains enabled at the higher magnetic field strength of 7 Tesla (the highest magnetic field widely available for human MRI
  • Finally, methods to perform quantitative characterization of our reporter cells were developed, with the goal of being able to characterize magnetic properties down to the single cell level, and also to be able to assess iron loading levels down to the single level in brain tissue slices.
  • We have made good progress in the third year. This project involves four separate scientific teams, brought together for the first time for this project, representing diverse backgrounds ranging from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) physics and cell tracking (Dr. Rutt), microbiology (Dr. Matin), nano and magnetic characterization (Dr. Moler) and imaging reporter development and testing in small animal models of disease (Dr. Contag). Substantial progress has been made by all four teams, and we have benefited from important interactions between all teams in this third year.
  • An overall summary of progress is that we evaluated several iron-binding bacterial genes (magA, mamB, mms6, mms13), both singly and doubly, in two mammalian cell lines (MDA-MB-231BR and DAOY). In year 2, we diversified and intensified the efforts to achieve expression of one or more of the bacterial genes in different cell lines, using different genetic constructs. We completed an effort to achieve optical labeling such that we could visualize the gene expression and to identify sub-cellular localization of the report gene products. In year 3, while continuing to face challenges with single gene constructs, we succeeded in finding substantial iron uptake in cells containing unique double gene expression, notably magA and mms13.
  • We completed much of the development of our higher field, higher sensitivity MR imaging methods and evaluated the sensitivity gains enabled at the higher magnetic field strength of 7 Tesla (the highest magnetic field widely available for human MRI).
  • Finally, we demonstrated novel nanomagnetic methods to characterize our reporter cells, able to characterize magnetic properties down to the single cell level.
  • We have made good progress during this 6-month extension period. This project involves four separate scientific teams, brought together for the first time for this project, representing diverse backgrounds ranging from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) physics and cell tracking (Dr. Rutt), microbiology (Dr. Matin), nano and magnetic characterization (Dr. Moler) and imaging reporter development and testing in small animal models of disease (Dr. Contag). Substantial progress has been made by all four teams, and we have benefited from important interactions between all teams in this third year.
  • An overall summary of progress is that we evaluated several iron-binding bacterial genes (magA, mamB, mms6, mms13), singly, doubly and triply, in several mammalian cell lines (MDA-MB-231BR, DAOY, COS1, 293FT). In year 3 as well as through the extension period, we succeeded in finding substantial iron uptake in cells containing certain expressed genes, notably mms13 by itself, as well as combinations of mms13 with mms6 and mamB.
  • We completed the development of our higher field, higher sensitivity MR imaging methods and evaluated the sensitivity gains enabled at the higher magnetic field strength of 7 Tesla (the highest magnetic field widely available for human MRI).
  • Finally, we demonstrated novel nanomagnetic methods to characterize our reporter cells, able to characterize magnetic properties down to the single cell level.

Repair of Conus Medullaris/Cauda Equina Injury using Human ES Cell-Derived Motor Neurons

Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01785
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 614 441
Disease Focus: 
Spinal Cord Injury
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Injuries to the spinal cord commonly result from motor vehicle accidents, traumatic falls, diving, surfing, skiing, and snowboarding accidents, other forms of sports injuries, as well as from gunshot injuries in victims of violent crimes. Injuries to the anatomically lowest part of the spinal cord, the lumbosacral portion and its associated nerve roots commonly cause paralysis, loss of sensation, severe pain, as well as loss of bladder, bowel, and sexual function. Lumbosacral injuries represent approximately one-fifth of all traumatic lesions to the human spinal cord. As a result of the direct injury to the lumbosacral portion of the spinal cord, there is degeneration and death of spinal cord nerve cells, which control muscles in the legs as well as bladder, bowel, and sexual function. No treatments are presently available in clinical practice to reverse the effects of these devastating injuries. In order to reverse the loss of function after lumbosacral spinal cord injury, replacement of the lost nerve cells is required. Recent research studies have identified some properties that are shared by spinal cord neurons responsible for muscle and bladder control. Human embryonic stem cells can now be prepared in research laboratories to develop properties that are shared between nerve cells controlling muscle and bladder function. Such nerve cells are particularly at risk of degeneration and death as a result of injuries to the lumbosacral spinal cord. Human embryonic stem cells, which have undergone treatment to obtain properties of muscle and bladder controlling nerve cells, are now very attractive development candidates for new cell replacement therapies after lumbosacral spinal cord injuries. The proposed feasibility studies will study the properties of such cells in a clinically relevant rat model for lumbosacral spinal cord injuries. In Specific Aim 1, we will determine whether ACUTE transplantation of human embryonic stem cells, which have been treated to develop properties of specific lumbosacral spinal cord neurons, may replace lost nerve cells and result in a return of bladder function in a rat model of lumbosacral spinal cord injury and repair. In Specific Aim 2, we will determine whether DELAYED transplantation of human embryonic stem cells, which have been treated to develop properties of specific lumbosacral spinal cord neurons, may replace lost nerve cells and result in a return of bladder function in a rat model of lumbosacral spinal cord injury and repair. A variety of functional studies will determine the effect of the cell transplantation on bladder function, walking, and pain. We will also use detailed anatomical studies to determine in microscopes whether the transplanted cells have grown processes to connect with pelvic target tissues, including the lower urinary tract. If successful, the proposed experiments may lead to a new treatment strategy for patients with lumbosacral spinal cord injuries.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
There are presently about 250,000 patients living with neurological impairments from spinal cord injuries (SCIs) in the United States, and approximately 11,000 new cases present every year. SCIs typically result in paralysis, loss of sensation, pain as well as bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction. No successful treatments are available to reverse the neurological deficits that result from SCI. Common causes for SCIs include car and motorcycle accidents, skiing, diving, surfing, and snow boarding injuries, traumatic falls, sports injuries, and acts of violence. California medical centers encounter a large proportion of the overall cases in the U.S. because of our large population, extensive network of freeways, and an active life style with recreational activities taking place both along the Californian coastline and in the mountains. The proposed development candidate feasibility project will capitalize on recent progress in human stem cell science and surgical repair of conus medullaris/cauda equina (CM/CE) forms of SCI. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons and neuronal progenitors, which express the transcription factor Hb9, will be transplanted into the conus medullaris in attempts to replace lost motor and autonomic neurons after a lumbosacral ventral root avulsion injury in rats. Surgical replantation of avulsed lumbosacral ventral roots into the spinal cord will also be performed in this clinically relevant model for CM/CE injury and repair. If successful, our development candidate may reinnervate muscles and pelvic organs, including the lower urinary tract after CM/CE forms of SCI. Return of functional bladder control represents one of the absolute top priorities among the spinal cord injured population (Anderson, J Neurotrauma, 2004; 21, 1371-83). Successful recovery of bladder function after SCI is expected to have very significant impact on the quality of life of spinal cord injured subjects and markedly reduce health care costs. Recovery of bladder function in spinal cord injured subjects would markedly reduce or eliminate the need for intermittent bladder catheterizations and indwelling bladder catheters. The number of visits in physicians’ offices and already over-crowded California emergency rooms for bladder infections and other complications would be markedly reduced, thereby significantly reducing health care costs for both patients and our state. Improved neurological function among the SCI population is also expected to reduce care giver needs, thereby further reducing health care costs. The increased independence that will result from improved bladder control and concomitant possible recovery of other neurological functions, for instance in transfers and locomotion, will promote return to and participation in the work force for many individuals with SCI. These effects are also expected to bring a very positive effect to the California economy and increased quality of life for those living with an SCI.
Progress Report: 
  • Injuries to the lowest portion of the spine and the spinal cord commonly results in paralysis and impairment of bladder , bowel, and sexual functions. These injuries are usually referred to as conus medullaris and cauda equina forms of spinal cord injuries. Presently, no treatments are available to reverse the neurological deficits that result from these injuries.
  • In this project, we aim to reverse neurological deficits, including bladder function, in a rat model of spinal cord injury, which affects the lowermost portion of the spinal cord. This part of the spinal cord and the associated nerve roots are called the conus medullaris and cauda equina. In our experimental model, nerve roots carrying fibers that control muscle function and pelvic organs, such as the bladder and bowel, are injured at the surface of the spinal cord. This injury mimics many of the neurological deficits encountered in human cases.
  • For treatment purposes, we transplant human derived embryonic stem cells, which have been prepared to acquire properties of motor neurons, into the lowermost portion of the rat spinal cord after injury and surgical repair of nerve roots carrying motor fibers. The studies will evaluate both acute and delayed transplantation of human embryonoic
  • During the first year of the studies, we have developed improved protocols to increase our ability to produce large number of motor neurons from human embryonic stem cells. We have also developed improved methods to detect motor neurons during the neuron production process by using fluorescent reporters inside of the cells. The latter development is of great help when sorting and preparing cells with desired properties for transplantation studies. In addition, we have refined our surgical methods to make it less invasive, using a one-sided injury model instead of lesions on both sides of the spinal cord in rats. Specifically, bladder dysfunction can be assess after a one sided injury of nerve roots and be evaluated using a combination of bladder pressure recorings and electrical recordings referred to as electromyography (EMG) from muscles along the urethra. The revised procedure is well tolerated by the rats and is a suitable approach for studies of chronic injury and cell-based long-term treatments. A research manuscript describing this improved experimental method and refinement has been submitted to a scientific journal and reviewed, and the manuscript is currently undergoing our revisions before being considered for publication. The experimental refinement will greatly assist with our long-term studies on the effects of transplanted motor neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells. We have also begun experiments using our refined model and cells, which now can be produced in high numbers and be identifiable during both the cell culture steps and during the animal studies. Initial tissues have been harvested and are being processed for morphological analyses.
  • Injuries to the lowest portion of the spine and the spinal cord commonly results in paralysis and impairment of bladder , bowel, and sexual functions. These injuries are usually referred to as conus medullaris and cauda equina forms of spinal cord injuries. Presently, no treatments are available to reverse the neurological deficits that result from these injuries.
  • In this project, we aim to reverse neurological deficits, including bladder function, in a rat model of spinal cord injury, which affects the lowermost portion of the spinal cord. This part of the spinal cord and the associated nerve roots are called the conus medullaris and cauda equina. In our experimental model, nerve roots carrying fibers that control muscle function and pelvic organs, such as the bladder and bowel, are injured at the surface of the spinal cord. This injury mimics many of the neurological deficits encountered in human cases.
  • For treatment purposes, we transplant human derived embryonic stem cells, which have been prepared to acquire properties of motor neurons, into the lowermost portion of the rat spinal cord after injury and surgical repair of nerve roots carrying motor fibers. The studies will evaluate both acute and delayed transplantation of human embryonic stem cells, which have acquired properties of motor neurons.
  • During the second year of the studies, we have developed improved protocols to increase our ability to produce large number of motor neurons from human embryonic stem cells. We have also developed improved methods to detect motor neurons during the neuron production process by using fluorescent reporters inside of the cells. The latter development is of great help when sorting and preparing cells with desired properties for transplantation studies. In addition, we have refined our surgical methods to make it less invasive, using a one-sided injury model instead of lesions on both sides of the spinal cord in rats. Specifically, bladder dysfunction can be assessed after a one sided injury of nerve roots and be evaluated using a combination of bladder pressure recordings and electrical recordings referred to as electromyography (EMG) from muscles along the urethra. The revised procedure is well tolerated by the rats and is a suitable approach for studies of chronic injury and cell-based long-term treatments. A research manuscript describing this improved experimental method and refinement has been published. The experimental refinement will greatly assist with our long-term studies on the effects of transplanted motor neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells. We have also performed transplantations of embryonic human stem cell derived motor neurons into the rat spinal cord and demonstrated surgical feasibility as well as survival of large numbers of neurons in the rat spinal cord. Some of the transplanted cells also demonstrate anatomical markers for motor neurons after transplantation.
  • During the reporting period, we have contined to demonstrate that human embryonic stem cell derived motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors can be produced in vitro. These motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors are transplanted into the rat spinal cord after a lumbosacral ventral root avulsion injury and repair of injured roots in the form of surgical re-attachment of the roots to the spinal cord surface. The lumbosacral ventral root avulsion injury mimics cauda equina and conus medullaris forms of spinal cord injury, an underserved patient population with paralysis of the legs and loss of bladder and bowel funcion. In this clinically relevant injury and repair model in rats, we have during the past several months demonstrated that transplanted human embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors are able to survive in the spinal cord of rats over extended periods of time with large numbers of neurons being detectable in the spinal cord grey matter at 1, 2, and 10 weeks after the injury, surgical root repair, and transplantation of the cells. The long term viability of translanted cells suggests integration of the transplanted cells in the host tissues. Some of the cells show expression of motor neuron markers, such as the transcription factor Hb9, as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and light microscopy.
  • Additional studies have been performed during this reporting period to address whether the transplanted cells may extend axons into the replanted lumbosacral ventral roots. Interestingly, many human axons were detected in the replanted ventral roots using immunohistochemitry and light microscopy for the detection of human processes. Additional immunohistochemistry demonstrated that these processes contained neurofilaments, which are characteristic for axons. In control experiments, we showed that avulsed roots, which had not been replanted into the spinal cord, did not exhibit any human axons. As expected, surgical reconnection of lesioned ventral roots to the spinal cord is needed in order for the axons of the transplanted human embryonic stem cell derived motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors to be extended into avulsed ventral roots. Furthermore, in a series of sham operated animals without ventral root lesions, human motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors were also transplanted into the rat spinal cord. Interestingly, the transplanted human motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors were here also able to extend axons into ventral roots, even though the ventral roots had never been lesions. We conclude that transplanted human embryonic stem cell derived motor neurons are capable of extending axons into both intact ventrl roots and into ventral roots, which had been avulsed and surgically reattached to the spinal cord using a replantation procedure.
  • In functional studies, we have performed urodynamic studies and voiding behavioral studies in rats after the transplantation of human embryonic stem cell derived motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors. These studies are still ongoing with additional experiments being performed. However, preliminary studies suggest that the combination of acute repair of avulsed ventral roots and cell transplantation results in a gradual improvement of voiding reflexes. Ongoing studies are addressing the relative contribution that may be provided by the replantation of avulsed ventral roots and by the transplantation of human motor neurons and motor neuron progenitors into the rat spinal cord.

Embryonic-Derived Neural Stem Cells for Treatment of Motor Sequelae following Sub-cortical Stroke

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Research I
Grant Number: 
DR1-01480
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$20 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Stroke
Neurological Disorders
Collaborative Funder: 
Germany
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
A stroke kills brain cells by interrupting blood flow. The most common “ischemic stroke” is due to blockage in blood flow from a clot or narrowing in an artery. Brain cells deprived of oxygen can die within minutes. The loss of physical and mental functions after stroke is often permanent and includes loss of movement, or motor, control. Stroke is the number one cause of disability, the second leading cause of dementia, and the third leading cause of death in adults. Lack of movement or motor control leads to job loss and withdrawal from pre-stroke community interactions in most patients and institutionalization in up to one-third of stroke victims. The most effective treatment for stroke, thrombolytics or “clot-busters”, can be administered only within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke. This narrow time window severely limits the number of stroke victims that may benefit from this treatment. This proposal develops a new therapy for stroke based on embryonic stem cells. Because our (and others’) laboratory research has shown that stem cells can augment the brain’s natural repair processes after stroke, these cells widen the stroke treatment opportunity by targeting the restorative or recovery phase (weeks or months after stroke instead of several hours). Embryonic stem cells can grow in a culture dish, but have the ability to produce any tissue in the body. We have developed a technique that allows us to restrict the potential of embryonic stem cells to producing cell types that are found in the brain, making them “neural stem cells”. These are more appropriate for treating stroke and may have lower potential for forming tumors. When these neural stem cells are transplanted into the brains of mice or rats one week after a stroke, the animals are able to regain strength in their limbs. Based on these findings, we propose in this grant to further develop these neural stem cells into a clinical development program for stroke in humans at the end of this grant period. This proposal develops a multidisciplinary team that will rigorously test the effectiveness of stem cell delivery in several models of stroke, while simultaneously developing processes for the precise manufacture, testing and regulatory approval of a stem cell therapy intended for human use. Each step in this process consists of definite milestones that must be achieved, and provides measurable assessment of progress toward therapy development. To accomplish this task, the team consists of stroke physician/scientists, pharmacologists, toxicologists, experts in FDA regulatory approval and key collaborations with biotechnology firms active in this area. This California-based team has a track record of close interactions and brings prior stroke clinical trial and basic science experience to the proposed translation of a stem cell therapy for stroke.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The State of California has made a historic investment in harnessing the potential of stem cells for regenerative therapy. While initially focused on developing new stem cell technologies, CIRM has recognized that translational progress from laboratory to clinic must also be fostered, for this is ultimately how Californians will benefit from their investment. Our focus on developing a neuro-restorative therapy for treatment of motor sequelae following sub-cortical stroke contains several benefits to California. The foremost benefit will be the development of a novel form of therapy for a major medical burden: The estimated economic burden for stroke exceeds $56.8 billion per year in the US, with 55% of this amount supporting chronic care of stroke survivors (1). While the stroke incidence markedly increases in the next half-century, death rates from stroke have declined. These statistics translate into an expected large increase in disabled stroke survivors (1) that will have a significant impact on many aspects of life for the average Californian. Stroke is the third greatest cause of death, and a leading cause of disability, among Californians. Compared to the nation, California has slightly above average rates for stroke (2). Treatments that improve repair and recovery in stroke will reduce this clinical burden. The team that has been recruited for this grant is made of uniquely qualified members, some of whom were involved in the development, manufacturing and regulatory aspects of the first clinical trial for safety of neural stem cells for stroke. Thus not only is the proposed work addressing a need that affects most Californians, it will result in the ability to initiate clinical studies of stem cells for stroke recovery from a consortium of academic and biotechnology groups in California. 1. Carmichael, ST. (2008) Themes and strategies for studying the biology of stroke recovery in the poststroke epoch. Stroke 39(4):1380-8. 2. Reynen DJ, Kamigaki AS, Pheatt N, Chaput LA. The Burden of Cardiovascular Disease in California: A Report of the California Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health, 2007.
Progress Report: 
  • A stroke kills brain cells by interrupting blood flow. The most common “ischemic stroke” is due to blockage in blood flow from a clot or narrowing in an artery. Brain cells deprived of oxygen can die within minutes. The loss of physical and mental functions after stroke is often permanent and includes loss of movement, or motor, control. Stroke is the number one cause of disability, the second leading cause of dementia, and the third leading cause of death in adults. Lack of movement or motor control leads to job loss and withdrawal from pre-stroke community interactions in most patients and institutionalization in up to one-third of stroke victims. The most effective treatment for stroke, thrombolytics or “clot-busters”, can be administered only within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke. This narrow time window severely limits the number of stroke victims that may benefit from this treatment. This proposal develops a new therapy for stroke based on embryonic stem cells. Because our (and others’) laboratory research has shown that stem cells can augment the brain’s natural repair processes after stroke, these cells widen the stroke treatment opportunity by targeting the restorative or recovery phase (weeks or months after stroke instead of several hours).
  • Embryonic stem cells can grow in a culture dish, but have the ability to produce any tissue in the body. We have developed a technique that allows us to restrict the potential of embryonic stem cells to producing cell types that are found in the brain, making them “neural stem cells”. These are more appropriate for treating stroke and may have lower potential for forming tumors. When these neural stem cells are transplanted into the brains of mice or rats one week after a stroke, the animals are able to regain strength in their limbs. Based on these findings, we propose in this grant to further develop these neural stem cells into a clinical development program for stroke in humans at the end of this grant period.
  • A multidisciplinary team is working rigorously to test the effectiveness of stem cell delivery in several models of stroke, while simultaneously developing processes for the precise manufacture, testing and regulatory approval of a stem cell therapy intended for human use. Each step in this process consists of definite milestones that are being achieved, providing measurable assessment of progress toward therapy development. To accomplish this task, the team consists of stroke physician/scientists, pharmacologists, toxicologists, experts in FDA regulatory approval and key collaborations with a biotechnology manufacturer active in this area. This California-based team has a track record of close interactions and brings prior stroke clinical trial and basic science experience to the proposed translation of a stem cell therapy for stroke.
  • In the first year of this program, the cells have been translated from an encouraging research level to a product which can be manufactured under conditions suitable for human administration. This has included optimization of the production process, development of reliable tests to confirm cell identity and function, and characterization of the cells utilizing these tests. In animal models in two additional laboratories , improvement in motor function following stroke has been confirmed. The method of administration has also been carefully studied. It has been determined that the cells will be administered around the area of stroke injury rather than directly into the middle of the stroke area. These results encourage the translation of this product from research into clinical trials for the treatment of motor deficit following stroke.
  • A stroke kills brain cells by interrupting blood flow. The most common “ischemic stroke” is due to blockage in blood flow from a clot or narrowing in an artery. Brain cells deprived of oxygen can die within minutes. The loss of physical and mental functions after stroke is often permanent and includes loss of movement, or motor, control. Stroke is the number one cause of disability, the second leading cause of dementia, and the third leading cause of death in adults. Lack of movement or motor control leads to job loss and withdrawal from pre-stroke community interactions in most patients and institutionalization in up to one-third of stroke victims. The most effective treatment for stroke, thrombolytics or “clot-busters”, can be administered only within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke. This narrow time window severely limits the number of stroke victims that may benefit from this treatment. This proposal develops a new therapy for stroke based on embryonic stem cells. Because our (and others’) laboratory research has shown that stem cells can augment the brain’s natural repair processes after stroke, these cells widen the stroke treatment opportunity by targeting the restorative or recovery phase (weeks or months after stroke instead of several hours).
  • Embryonic stem cells can grow in a culture dish, but have the ability to produce any tissue in the body. We have developed a technique that allows us to restrict the potential of embryonic stem cells to producing cell types that are found in the brain, making them “neural stem cells”. These are more appropriate for treating stroke and may have lower potential for forming tumors. When these neural stem cells are transplanted into the brains of mice or rats one week after a stroke, the animals are able to regain strength in their limbs. Based on these findings, we propose in this grant to further develop these neural stem cells into a clinical development program for stroke in humans at the end
  • of this grant period.
  • A multidisciplinary team is working rigorously to test the effectiveness of stem cell delivery in several models of stroke, while simultaneously developing processes for the precise manufacture, testing and regulatory approval of a stem cell therapy intended for human use. Each step in this process consists
  • of definite milestones that are being achieved, providing measurable assessment of progress toward therapy development. To accomplish this task, the team consists of stroke physician/scientists, pharmacologists, toxicologists, experts in FDA regulatory approval and key collaborations with a biotechnology manufacturer active in this area. This California-based team has a track record of close interactions and brings prior stroke clinical trial and basic science experience to the proposed translation of a stem cell therapy for stroke.
  • A stroke kills brain cells by interrupting blood flow. The most common “ischemic stroke” is due to blockage in blood flow from a clot or narrowing in an artery. Brain cells deprived of oxygen can die within minutes. The loss of physical and mental functions after stroke is often permanent and includes loss of movement, or motor control. Stroke is the number one cause of disability, the second leading cause of dementia, and the third leading cause of death in adults. Lack of movement or motor control leads to job loss and withdrawal from pre-stroke community interactions in most patients and institutionalization in up to one-third of stroke victims. The most effective treatment for stroke, thrombolytics or “clot-busters”, can be administered only within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke. This narrow time window severely limits the number of stroke victims that may benefit from this treatment. This proposal develops a new therapy for stroke based on embryonic stem cells. Because our (and others’) laboratory research has shown that stem cells can augment the brain’s natural repair processes after stroke, these cells widen the stroke treatment opportunity by targeting the restorative or recovery phase (weeks or months after stroke instead of several hours).
  • Embryonic stem cells can grow in a culture dish, but have the ability to produce any tissue in the body. We have developed a technique that allows us to restrict the potential of embryonic stem cells to producing cell types that are found in the brain, making them “neural stem cells”. These are more appropriate for treating stroke and may have lower potential for forming tumors. When these neural stem cells are transplanted into the brains of mice or rats one week after a stroke, the animals are able to regain strength in their limbs. Based on these findings this grant is supporting conduct of IND-enabling work to initiate a clinical development program for stroke in humans by the end of this grant period.
  • A multidisciplinary team is working rigorously to test the effectiveness of stem cell delivery in several models of stroke, while enabling precise manufacture, testing and regulatory clearance of a first in human clinical trial. Defined milestones are being achieved, providing measurable assessment of progress toward therapy development. Definitive manufacturing and pharmacology studies are underway and regulatory filings are in progress. The team consists of stroke physician/scientists, pharmacologists, toxicologists, experts in FDA regulatory and key collaborations with a biotechnology manufacturer active in this area. This California-based team has a track record of close interactions and brings prior stroke clinical trial and basic science experience to the proposed translation of a stem cell therapy for stroke.
  • A stroke kills brain cells by interrupting blood flow. The most common 'ischemic stroke' is due to blockage in blood flow from a clot or narrowing in an artery. Brain cells deprived of oxygen can die within minutes. The loss of physical and mental functions after stroke is often permanent and includes loss of movement, or motor, control. Stroke is the number one cause of disability, the second leading cause of dementia, and the third leading cause of death in adults. Lack of movement or motor control leads to job loss and withdrawal from pre-stroke community interactions in most patients and institutionalization in up to one-third of stroke victims. The most effective treatment for stroke, thrombolytics or 'clot-busters', can be administered only within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke. This narrow time window severely limits the number of stroke victims that may benefit from this treatment. This proposal develops a new therapy for stroke based on embryonic stem cells. Because our (and others') laboratory research has shown that stem cells can augment the brain's natural repair processes after stroke, these cells widen the stroke treatment opportunity by targeting the restorative or recovery phase (weeks or months after stroke instead of several hours).
  • Embryonic stem cells can grow in a culture dish, but have the ability to produce any tissue in the body. We have developed a technique that allows us to restrict the potential of embryonic stem cells to producing cell types that are found in the brain, making them 'neural stem cells'. These are more appropriate for treating stroke and may have lower potential for forming tumors. When these neural stem cells are transplanted into the brains of mice or rats one week after a stroke, the animals are able to regain strength in their limbs. Based on these findings this grant is supporting conduct of IND-enabling work to initiate a clinical development program for stroke in humans by the end of this grant period.
  • A multidisciplinary team is working to test the effectiveness of stem cell delivery in several models of stroke, while enabling precise manufacture, testing and regulatory clearance of a first in human clinical trial. Defined milestones are being achieved, providing measurable assessment of progress toward therapy development. Definitive manufacturing and pharmacology studies are underway and regulatory filings are in progress. The team consists of stroke physicians/scientists, pharmacologists, toxicologists, experts in FDA regulatory and key collaborations with a biotechnology manufacturer active in this area. This California-based team has a track record of close interactions and brings prior stroke clinical trial and basic science experience to the proposed translation of a stem cell therapy for stroke.

Generation and characterization of high-quality, footprint-free human induced pluripotent stem cell lines from 3,000 donors to investigate multigenic diseases

Funding Type: 
hiPSC Derivation
Grant Number: 
ID1-06557
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$16 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Developmental Disorders
Genetic Disorder
Heart Disease
Infectious Disease
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Autism
Respiratory Disorders
Vision Loss
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the potential to differentiate to nearly any cells of the body, thereby providing a new paradigm for studying normal and aberrant biological networks in nearly all stages of development. Donor-specific iPSCs and differentiated cells made from them can be used for basic and applied research, for developing better disease models, and for regenerative medicine involving novel cell therapies and tissue engineering platforms. When iPSCs are derived from a disease-carrying donor; the iPSC-derived differentiated cells may show the same disease phenotype as the donor, producing a very valuable cell type as a disease model. To facilitate wider access to large numbers of iPSCs in order to develop cures for polygenic diseases, we will use a an episomal reprogramming system to produce 3 well-characterized iPSC lines from each of 3,000 selected donors. These donors may express traits related to Alzheimer’s disease, autism spectrum disorders, autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cerebral palsy, diabetes, or respiratory diseases. The footprint-free iPSCs will be derived from donor peripheral blood or skin biopsies. iPSCs made by this method have been thoroughly tested, routinely grown at large scale, and differentiated to produce cardiomyocytes, neurons, hepatocytes, and endothelial cells. The 9,000 iPSC lines developed in this proposal will be made widely available to stem cell researchers studying these often intractable diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer great promise to the large number of Californians suffering from often intractable polygenic diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, autism spectrum disorders, autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and respiratory disease. iPSCs can be generated from numerous adult tissues, including blood or skin, in 4–5 weeks and then differentiated to almost any desired terminal cell type. When iPSCs are derived from a disease-carrying donor, the iPSC-derived differentiated cells may show the same disease phenotype as the donor. In these cases, the cells will be useful for understanding disease biology and for screening drug candidates, and California researchers will benefit from access to a large, genetically diverse iPSC bank. The goal of this project is to reprogram 3,000 tissue samples from patients who have been diagnosed with various complex diseases and from healthy controls. These tissue samples will be used to generate fully characterized, high-quality iPSC lines that will be banked and made readily available to researchers for basic and clinical research. These efforts will ultimately lead to better medicines and/or cellular therapies to treat afflicted Californians. As iPSC research progresses to commercial development and clinical applications, more and more California patients will benefit and a substantial number of new jobs will be created in the state.
Progress Report: 
  • First year progress on grant ID1-06557, " Generation and Characterization of High-Quality, Footprint-Free Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) Lines From 3000 Donors to Investigate Multigenic Disease" has met all agreed-upon milestones. In particular, Cellular Dynamics International (CDI) has taken lease to approximately 5000 square feet of lab space at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, CA. The majority of this space is located within the new CIRM-funded Stem Cell Research Building at the Buck Institute and was extensively reconfigured to meet the specific needs of this grant. All equipment, including tissue culture safety cabinets and incubators, liquid-handling robotics, and QC instrumentation have been installed and qualified. A total of 16 scientists have been hired and trained (13 in Production and 3 in Quality) and more than 20 Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) have been developed and approved specifically for this project. These SOPs serve to govern the daily activities of the Production and Quality staff and help ensure consistency and quality throughout the iPSC derivation and characterization process. In addition, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) had to be developed to handle the large amount of data generated by this project and to track all samples from start to finish. The first and most important phase of this LIMS project has been completed; additional functionalities will likely be added to the LIMS during the next year, but completion of phase 1 will allow us to enter full production mode on schedule in the first quarter of year 2. Procedures for the shipping, infectious disease testing, and processing of donor samples were successfully implemented with the seven Tissue Collectors. To date, over 700 samples have been received from these Tissue Collectors and derivation of the first 50 patient-derived iPSC lines has been completed on schedule. These cells have been banked in the Coriell BioRepository, also located at the Buck Institute. The first Distribution Banks will be available for commercial release during year 2.

Stem Cell Mechanisms Governing Discrete Waves of Gliogenesis in the Childhood Brain

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-06093
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 264 248
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
White matter is the infrastructure of the brain, providing conduits for communication between neural regions. White matter continues to mature from birth until early adulthood, particularly in regions of brain critical for higher cognitive functions. However, the precise timing of white matter maturation in the various neural circuits is not well described, and the mechanisms controlling white matter developmental/maturation are poorly understood. White matter is conceptually like wires and their insulating sheath is a substance called myelin. It is clear that neural stem and precursor cells contribute significantly to white matter maturation by forming the cells that generate myelin. In the proposed experiments, we will map the precise timing of myelination in the human brain and changes in the populations of neural precursor cells that generate myelin from birth to adulthood and define mechanisms that govern the process of white matter maturation. The resulting findings about how white matter develops may provide insights for white matter regeneration to aid in therapy for diseases such as cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Diseases of white matter account for significant neurological morbidity in both children and adults in California. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern white matter development the may unlock clues to the regenerative potential of endogeneous stem and precursor cells in the childhood and adult brain. Although the brain continues robust white matter development throughout childhood, adolescence and young adulthood, relatively little is known about the mechanisms that orchestrate proliferation, differentiation and functional maturation of neural stem and precursor cells to generate myelin-forming oligodendrocytes during postnatal brain development. In the present proposal, we will define how white matter precursor cell populations vary with age throughout the brain and determine if and how neuronal activity instructs neural stem and precursor cell contributions to human white matter myelin maturation. Disruption of white matter myelination is implicated in a range of neurological diseases, including cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, cognitive dysfunction from chemotherapy exposure, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and even psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia. The results of these studies have the potential to elucidate clues to white matter regeneration that may benefit hundreds of thousands of Californians.
Progress Report: 
  • Formation of the insulated fiber infrastructure of the human brain (called "myelin") depends upon the function of a precursor cell type called "oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC)". The first Aim of this study seeks to determine how OPCs differ from each other in different regions of the brain, and over different ages. Understanding this heterogeneity is important as we explore the regenerative capacity of this class of precursor cells. We have, in the past year, isolated OPCs from various regions of the human brain from individuals at various ages and are studying the molecular characteristics of these precursor cells at the single cell level in order to define distinct OPC subpopulations. We have also begun to study the functional capabilities of OPCs isolated from different brain regions. The second Aim of this study seeks to understand how interactions between electrically active neurons and OPCs affect OPC function and myelin formation. We have found that when mouse motor cortex neurons "fire" signals in such a way as to elicit a complex motor behavior, much as would happen when one practices a motor task, OPCs within that circuit respond and myelination increases. This affects the function of that circuit in a lasting way. These results indicate that neurons and OPCs interact in important ways to modulate myelination and supports the hypothesis that OPC function may play a role in learning.

Immune-Matched Neural Stem Cell Transplantation for Pediatric Neurodegenerative Disease

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05476
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$5 509 978
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Children with inherited degenerative diseases of the brain will be among the first to benefit from novel approaches based on stem cell therapy (SCT). This assertion is based on a number of medical and experimental observations and precedents including: 1) These diseases currently lack effective therapies and can cause profound mental retardation or lead to death; 2) SCT has already been shown to work in the milder forms of similar diseases that do not affect the brain; 3) Experimental work and early clinical studies have clearly shown that stem cells delivered directly into the brain can be used to treat diseases affecting the brain; and 4) The clinical safety of stem cells delivered directly into the brain has already been established during recent Phase 1 clinical trials. Our approach is designed to lead to a therapeutic development candidate, based on stem cells, by addressing two critical issues: (i) that early intervention is not only required but is indeed possible in this patient population and that, (ii) induction of immune tolerance is also required. We not only address these two important issues but also set the stage for efficient translation of our approach into clinical practice, by adapting transplant techniques that are standard in clinical practice or in clinical trials and using laboratory cell biology methods that are easily transferrable to the scale and processes of clinical cell manufacturing.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
We are focusing on a class of childhood brain diseases that causes a child's brain to degenerate and results in severe mental retardation or death, in addition to damage to many other organ systems. These diseases are not yet represented in CIRM’s portfolio. Recently blood stem cell transplantation has been applied to these diseases, showing that some of the organ systems can be rescued by stem cell therapy. Unfortunately, the brain component of the disease is not impacted by blood stem cell therapy. Our team proposes to take these important lessons to develop a therapy that treats all organ dysfunction, including brain. Because of the established stem cell success in the clinical treatment of non-brain organs and the experimental treatment of the brain, we propose a novel, combined stem cell therapy. Based on our own work and recent clinical experience, this dual stem cell therapy has a high probability of success for slowing or reversing disease, and importantly, will not require children to be treated with toxic immunosuppressive drugs. This therapy will thus benefit California by: 1) reducing disease burden in individuals and the State's burden for caring for these children; 2) providing a successful model of stem cell therapy of the brain that will both bolster public confidence in CIRM's mission to move complex stem cell therapies into the clinic; and 3) laying the groundwork for using this type of therapy with other brain diseases of children.
Progress Report: 
  • The purpose of the ET3RA is to establish an experimental model of stem cell transplantation that accomplishes two equally important goals: 1) to devise a strategy of protection of the child's brain from the ravages of certain genetic diseases and 2) to devise a simultaneous strategy of transplantation that avoids immune system rejection. In our first year of work, we have shown that we can reliably produce the stem cells that we want to transplant into the brains of experimental animals (mice). We have also bred sufficient numbers of mice for the transplant experiments and have started the immune system-based strategy of transplantation. This puts us in the proper position to begin the brain stem cell transplantation in year 2. Thus, we are on course to accomplishing our goals for this ET3RA and for eventual development of this strategy for the initiation of clinical trials.
  • The purpose of the ET3RA is to establish an experimental model of stem cell transplantation that accomplishes two equally important goals: 1) to devise a strategy of protection of the child's brain from the ravages of certain genetic diseases and 2) to devise a simultaneous strategy of transplantation that avoids immune system rejection. In our first year of work, we have shown that we can reliably produce the stem cells that we want to transplant into the brains of experimental animals (mice). We have also bred sufficient numbers of mice for the transplant experiments and have started the immune system-based strategy of transplantation. During the second year, we successfully finished our first round of transplantation experiments, we fully characterized the stem cells for brain transplantation, we showed that the cells have the desired biological effects in the culture dish, and we completed installation of our Cell Production Facility. Thus, we are still on course to accomplishing our goals for this ET3RA and for eventual development of this strategy for the initiation of clinical trials.

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