Neurological Disorders

Coding Dimension ID: 
303
Coding Dimension path name: 
Neurological Disorders
Funding Type: 
New Faculty Physician Scientist
Grant Number: 
RN3-06530
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 031 737
Disease Focus: 
Neuropathy
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

The applicant is an MD/PhD trained physician scientist, whose clinical expertise is neuromuscular disorders including peripheral nerve disease. The proposal is aimed at providing a research proposal and career development plan that will allow the applicant to develop an independent research program, which attempts to bring stem cell based therapies to patients with peripheral nerve diseases. The proposal will use “adult stem cells” derived from patients with an inherited nerve disease, correct the genetic abnormality in those cells, and determine the feasibility of transplanting the genetically engineered cells back into peripheral nerve to slow disease progression.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

The proposed research will benefit the State of California as it will support the career development of a uniquely trained physician scientist to establish an innovative translational stem cell research program aimed toward direct clinical application to patients. The cutting edge technologies proposed are directly in line with the fundamental purpose of the California Initiative for Regenerative Medicine. If successful, both scientific and patient advocate organizations would recognize that these advances came directly from the unique efforts of CIRM and the State of California to lead the world in stem cell research. Finally, as a result of funding of this award, further financial investments from private and public funding organizations would directly benefit the State in the years to come.

Progress Report: 
  • During this award period we have made significant progress. We have established induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from four patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) due to the PMP22 duplication. We have validated our strategy to genetically engineer induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with inherited neuropathy, and have genetically engineered several patient lines. We further have begun to differentiate these iPSCs into Schwann cell precursors, to begin to investigate cell type specific defects that cause peripheral neurodegeneration in patients with CMT1A. Finally we have imported and characterized a transgenic rat model of CMT1A in order to begin to investigate the ability to inject iPSC derived Schwann cell precursors into rodent nerves as a possible neuroprotective strategy.
  • During this reporting period we developed genetically corrected induced pluripotent stem cell lines from patients with CMT1A. We improved and validated a novel method for differentiating Schwann cells from iPSCs, and used this to generate human Schwann cells from patients and controls. Finally we have initiated pilot studies injecting human iPSC derived Schwann cells into the peripheral nerves of rats with myelin diseases to determine whether cell replacement therapy is a viable strategy in these disorders.
Funding Type: 
Strategic Partnership III Track A
Grant Number: 
SP3A-07552
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$14 323 318
Disease Focus: 
Spinal Cord Injury
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

The proposed project is designed to assess the safety and preliminary activity of escalating doses of human embryonic stem cell derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) for the treatment of spinal cord injury. OPCs have two important functions: they produce factors which stimulate the survival and growth of nerve cells after injury, and they mature in the spinal cord to produce myelin, the insulation which enables electrical signals to be conducted within the spinal cord.

Clinical testing of this product initiated in 2010 after extensive safety and efficacy testing in more than 20 nonclinical studies. Initial clinical safety testing was conducted in five subjects with neurologically complete thoracic injuries. No safety concerns have been observed after following these five subjects for more than two years. The current project proposes to extend testing to subjects with neurologically complete cervical injuries, the intended population for further clinical development, and the population considered most likely to benefit from the therapy. Initial safety testing will be performed in three subjects at a low dose level, with subsequent groups of five subjects at higher doses bracketing the range believed most likely to result in functional improvements. Subjects will be monitored both for evidence of safety issues and for signs of neurological improvement using a variety of neurological, imaging and laboratory assessments.

By completion of the project, we expect to have accumulated sufficient safety and dosing data to support initiation of an expanded efficacy study of a single selected dose in the intended clinical target population.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

The proposed project has the potential to benefit the state of California by improving medical outcomes for California residents with spinal cord injuries (SCIs), building on California’s leadership position in the field of stem cell research, and creating high quality biotechnology jobs for Californians.

Over 12,000 Americans suffer an SCI each year, and approximately 1.3 million people in the United States are estimated to be living with a spinal cord injury. Although specific estimates for the state of California are not available, the majority of SCI result from motor vehicle accidents, falls, acts of violence, and recreational sporting activities, all of which are common in California. Thus, the annual incidence of SCI in California is likely equal to or higher than the 1,400 cases predicted by a purely population-based distribution of the nationwide incidence.

The medical, societal and economic burden of SCI is extraordinarily high. Traumatic SCI most commonly impacts individuals in their 20s and 30s, resulting in a high-level of permanent disability in young and previously healthy individuals. At one year post injury, only 11.8% of SCI patients are employed, and fewer than 35% are employed even at more than twenty years post-injury (NSCISC Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures 2013). Life expectancies of SCI patients are significantly below those of similar aged patients with no SCI. Additionally, many patients require help with activities of daily living such as feeding and bathing. As a result, the lifetime cost of care for SCI patients are enormous; a recent paper (Cao et al 2009) estimated lifetime costs of care for a patient obtaining a cervical SCI (the population to be enrolled in this study) at age 25 at $4.2 million. Even partial correction of any of the debilitating consequences of SCI could enhance activities of daily living, increase employment, and decrease reliance on attendant and medical care, resulting in substantial improvements in both quality of life and cost of care for SCI patients.

California has a history of leadership both in biotechnology and in stem cell research. The product described in this application was invented in California, and has already undergone safety testing in five patients in a clinical study initiated by a California corporation. The applicant, who has licensed this product from its original developer and recruited many of the employees responsible for its previous development, currently employs 17 full-time employees at its California headquarters, with plans to significantly increase in size over the coming years. The successful performance of the proposed project would enable significant additional jobs creation in preparation for pivotal trials and product registration.

Funding Type: 
New Faculty Physician Scientist
Grant Number: 
RN3-06510
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 800 536
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Brain Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Chemotherapy for cancer is often life saving, but it also causes a debilitating syndrome of impaired cognition characterized by deficits in attention, concentration, information processing speed, multitasking and memory. As a result, many cancer survivors find themselves unable to return to work or function in their lives as they had before their cancer therapy. These cognitive deficits, colloquially known as "chemobrain" or "chemofog," are long-lasting and sometimes irreversible. For example, breast cancer survivors treated with chemotherapy suffer from cognitive disability even 20 years later.

These cognitive problems occur because chemotherapy damages the neural stem and precursor cells necessary for the health of the brain's infrastructure, called white matter. We have discovered a powerful way to recruit the stem/precursor cells required for white matter repair that depends on an interaction between the electrical cells of the brain, neurons, and these white matter stem/precursor cells. In this project, we will determine the key molecules responsible for the regenerative influence of neurons on these white matter stem cells and will develop that molecule (or molecules) into a drug to treat chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction. If successful, this will result in the first effective treatment for a disease that affects at least a million cancer survivors in California.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Approximately 100,000 Californians are diagnosed with cancer each year, and the majority of these people require chemotherapy. While cancer chemotherapy is often life saving, it also causes a debilitating neurocognitive syndrome characterized by impaired attention, concentration, information processing speed, multitasking and memory. As a result, many cancer survivors find themselves unable to return to work or function in their lives as they had before their cancer therapy. These cognitive deficits, colloquially known as "chemobrain" or "chemofog" are long-lasting; for example, cognitive deficits have been demonstrated in breast cancer survivors treated with chemotherapy even 20 years later. With increasing cancer survival rates, the number of people living with cognitive disability from chemotherapy is growing and includes well over a million Californians. Presently, there is no known therapy for chemotherapy-induced cognitive decline, and physicians can only offer symptomatic treatment with medications such as psychostimulants.

The underlying cause of "chemobrain" is damage to neural stem and precursor cell populations. The proposed project may result in an effective regenerative strategy to restore damaged neural precursor cell populations and ameliorate or cure the cognitive syndrome caused by chemotherapy. The benefit to California in terms of improved quality of life for cancer survivors and restored occupational productivity would be immeasurable.

Progress Report: 
  • Cancer chemotherapy can be lifesaving but frequently results in long-term cognitive deficits. This project seeks to establish a regenerative strategy for chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction by harnessing the potential of the interactions between active neurons and glial precursor cells that promote myelin plasticity in the healthy brain. In the first year of this award, we have made on-track progress towards establishing a working experimental model system of chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity that faithfully models the human disease both in terms of the cellular damage as well as functional deficits in cognition. We have also been able to identify several therapeutic candidate molecules that we will be studying in the coming years of the project to ascertain which of these candidates are sufficient to promote OPC population repletion and neuro-regeneration after chemotherapy exposure.
  • Cancer chemotherapy can be lifesaving but frequently results in long-term cognitive deficits. This project seeks to establish a regenerative strategy for chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction by harnessing the potential of the interactions between active neurons and glial precursor cells that promote myelin plasticity in the healthy brain. In the first year of this award, we have made on-track progress towards establishing a working experimental model system of chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity that faithfully models the human disease both in terms of the cellular damage as well as functional deficits in cognition. Using this model, we have found that the oligodendroglial precursor cell population depletion following chemotherapy is due not only to a direct effect of the chemotherapy on the OPCs, but also due to alterations in the microenvironmental milieu of the brain that normally maintains this population of cells. We have also been able to identify several therapeutic candidate molecules that we will be studying in the coming years of the project to ascertain which of these candidates are sufficient to promote OPC population repletion and neuro-regeneration after chemotherapy exposure.
Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05476
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$5 509 978
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Children with inherited degenerative diseases of the brain will be among the first to benefit from novel approaches based on stem cell therapy (SCT). This assertion is based on a number of medical and experimental observations and precedents including:

1) These diseases currently lack effective therapies and can cause profound mental retardation or lead to death;
2) SCT has already been shown to work in the milder forms of similar diseases that do not affect the brain;
3) Experimental work and early clinical studies have clearly shown that stem cells delivered directly into the brain can be used to treat diseases affecting the brain; and
4) The clinical safety of stem cells delivered directly into the brain has already been established during recent Phase 1 clinical trials.

Our approach is designed to lead to a therapeutic development candidate, based on stem cells, by addressing two critical issues: (i) that early intervention is not only required but is indeed possible in this patient population and that, (ii) induction of immune tolerance is also required. We not only address these two important issues but also set the stage for efficient translation of our approach into clinical practice, by adapting transplant techniques that are standard in clinical practice or in clinical trials and using laboratory cell biology methods that are easily transferrable to the scale and processes of clinical cell manufacturing.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

We are focusing on a class of childhood brain diseases that causes a child's brain to degenerate and results in severe mental retardation or death, in addition to damage to many other organ systems. These diseases are not yet represented in CIRM’s portfolio. Recently blood stem cell transplantation has been applied to these diseases, showing that some of the organ systems can be rescued by stem cell therapy. Unfortunately, the brain component of the disease is not impacted by blood stem cell therapy. Our team proposes to take these important lessons to develop a therapy that treats all organ dysfunction, including brain. Because of the established stem cell success in the clinical treatment of non-brain organs and the experimental treatment of the brain, we propose a novel, combined stem cell therapy. Based on our own work and recent clinical experience, this dual stem cell therapy has a high probability of success for slowing or reversing disease, and importantly, will not require children to be treated with toxic immunosuppressive drugs. This therapy will thus benefit California by: 1) reducing disease burden in individuals and the State's burden for caring for these children; 2) providing a successful model of stem cell therapy of the brain that will both bolster public confidence in CIRM's mission to move complex stem cell therapies into the clinic; and 3) laying the groundwork for using this type of therapy with other brain diseases of children.

Progress Report: 
  • The purpose of the ET3RA is to establish an experimental model of stem cell transplantation that accomplishes two equally important goals: 1) to devise a strategy of protection of the child's brain from the ravages of certain genetic diseases and 2) to devise a simultaneous strategy of transplantation that avoids immune system rejection. In our first year of work, we have shown that we can reliably produce the stem cells that we want to transplant into the brains of experimental animals (mice). We have also bred sufficient numbers of mice for the transplant experiments and have started the immune system-based strategy of transplantation. This puts us in the proper position to begin the brain stem cell transplantation in year 2. Thus, we are on course to accomplishing our goals for this ET3RA and for eventual development of this strategy for the initiation of clinical trials.
  • The purpose of the ET3RA is to establish an experimental model of stem cell transplantation that accomplishes two equally important goals: 1) to devise a strategy of protection of the child's brain from the ravages of certain genetic diseases and 2) to devise a simultaneous strategy of transplantation that avoids immune system rejection. In our first year of work, we have shown that we can reliably produce the stem cells that we want to transplant into the brains of experimental animals (mice). We have also bred sufficient numbers of mice for the transplant experiments and have started the immune system-based strategy of transplantation. During the second year, we successfully finished our first round of transplantation experiments, we fully characterized the stem cells for brain transplantation, we showed that the cells have the desired biological effects in the culture dish, and we completed installation of our Cell Production Facility. Thus, we are still on course to accomplishing our goals for this ET3RA and for eventual development of this strategy for the initiation of clinical trials.
Funding Type: 
Disease Team Research I
Grant Number: 
DR1-01480
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$20 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Stroke
Neurological Disorders
Collaborative Funder: 
Germany
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

A stroke kills brain cells by interrupting blood flow. The most common “ischemic stroke” is due to blockage in blood flow from a clot or narrowing in an artery. Brain cells deprived of oxygen can die within minutes. The loss of physical and mental functions after stroke is often permanent and includes loss of movement, or motor, control. Stroke is the number one cause of disability, the second leading cause of dementia, and the third leading cause of death in adults. Lack of movement or motor control leads to job loss and withdrawal from pre-stroke community interactions in most patients and institutionalization in up to one-third of stroke victims. The most effective treatment for stroke, thrombolytics or “clot-busters”, can be administered only within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke. This narrow time window severely limits the number of stroke victims that may benefit from this treatment. This proposal develops a new therapy for stroke based on embryonic stem cells. Because our (and others’) laboratory research has shown that stem cells can augment the brain’s natural repair processes after stroke, these cells widen the stroke treatment opportunity by targeting the restorative or recovery phase (weeks or months after stroke instead of several hours).

Embryonic stem cells can grow in a culture dish, but have the ability to produce any tissue in the body. We have developed a technique that allows us to restrict the potential of embryonic stem cells to producing cell types that are found in the brain, making them “neural stem cells”. These are more appropriate for treating stroke and may have lower potential for forming tumors. When these neural stem cells are transplanted into the brains of mice or rats one week after a stroke, the animals are able to regain strength in their limbs. Based on these findings, we propose in this grant to further develop these neural stem cells into a clinical development program for stroke in humans at the end of this grant period.

This proposal develops a multidisciplinary team that will rigorously test the effectiveness of stem cell delivery in several models of stroke, while simultaneously developing processes for the precise manufacture, testing and regulatory approval of a stem cell therapy intended for human use. Each step in this process consists of definite milestones that must be achieved, and provides measurable assessment of progress toward therapy development. To accomplish this task, the team consists of stroke physician/scientists, pharmacologists, toxicologists, experts in FDA regulatory approval and key collaborations with biotechnology firms active in this area. This California-based team has a track record of close interactions and brings prior stroke clinical trial and basic science experience to the proposed translation of a stem cell therapy for stroke.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

The State of California has made a historic investment in harnessing the potential of stem cells for regenerative therapy. While initially focused on developing new stem cell technologies, CIRM has recognized that translational progress from laboratory to clinic must also be fostered, for this is ultimately how Californians will benefit from their investment. Our focus on developing a neuro-restorative therapy for treatment of motor sequelae following sub-cortical stroke contains several benefits to California. The foremost benefit will be the development of a novel form of therapy for a major medical burden: The estimated economic burden for stroke exceeds $56.8 billion per year in the US, with 55% of this amount supporting chronic care of stroke survivors (1). While the stroke incidence markedly increases in the next half-century, death rates from stroke have declined. These statistics translate into an expected large increase in disabled stroke survivors (1) that will have a significant impact on many aspects of life for the average Californian. Stroke is the third greatest cause of death, and a leading cause of disability, among Californians. Compared to the nation, California has slightly above average rates for stroke (2). Treatments that improve repair and recovery in stroke will reduce this clinical burden.

The team that has been recruited for this grant is made of uniquely qualified members, some of whom were involved in the development, manufacturing and regulatory aspects of the first clinical trial for safety of neural stem cells for stroke. Thus not only is the proposed work addressing a need that affects most Californians, it will result in the ability to initiate clinical studies of stem cells for stroke recovery from a consortium of academic and biotechnology groups in California.

1. Carmichael, ST. (2008) Themes and strategies for studying the biology of stroke recovery in the poststroke epoch. Stroke 39(4):1380-8.

2. Reynen DJ, Kamigaki AS, Pheatt N, Chaput LA. The Burden of Cardiovascular Disease in California: A Report of the California Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health, 2007.

Progress Report: 
  • A stroke kills brain cells by interrupting blood flow. The most common “ischemic stroke” is due to blockage in blood flow from a clot or narrowing in an artery. Brain cells deprived of oxygen can die within minutes. The loss of physical and mental functions after stroke is often permanent and includes loss of movement, or motor, control. Stroke is the number one cause of disability, the second leading cause of dementia, and the third leading cause of death in adults. Lack of movement or motor control leads to job loss and withdrawal from pre-stroke community interactions in most patients and institutionalization in up to one-third of stroke victims. The most effective treatment for stroke, thrombolytics or “clot-busters”, can be administered only within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke. This narrow time window severely limits the number of stroke victims that may benefit from this treatment. This proposal develops a new therapy for stroke based on embryonic stem cells. Because our (and others’) laboratory research has shown that stem cells can augment the brain’s natural repair processes after stroke, these cells widen the stroke treatment opportunity by targeting the restorative or recovery phase (weeks or months after stroke instead of several hours).
  • Embryonic stem cells can grow in a culture dish, but have the ability to produce any tissue in the body. We have developed a technique that allows us to restrict the potential of embryonic stem cells to producing cell types that are found in the brain, making them “neural stem cells”. These are more appropriate for treating stroke and may have lower potential for forming tumors. When these neural stem cells are transplanted into the brains of mice or rats one week after a stroke, the animals are able to regain strength in their limbs. Based on these findings, we propose in this grant to further develop these neural stem cells into a clinical development program for stroke in humans at the end of this grant period.
  • A multidisciplinary team is working rigorously to test the effectiveness of stem cell delivery in several models of stroke, while simultaneously developing processes for the precise manufacture, testing and regulatory approval of a stem cell therapy intended for human use. Each step in this process consists of definite milestones that are being achieved, providing measurable assessment of progress toward therapy development. To accomplish this task, the team consists of stroke physician/scientists, pharmacologists, toxicologists, experts in FDA regulatory approval and key collaborations with a biotechnology manufacturer active in this area. This California-based team has a track record of close interactions and brings prior stroke clinical trial and basic science experience to the proposed translation of a stem cell therapy for stroke.
  • In the first year of this program, the cells have been translated from an encouraging research level to a product which can be manufactured under conditions suitable for human administration. This has included optimization of the production process, development of reliable tests to confirm cell identity and function, and characterization of the cells utilizing these tests. In animal models in two additional laboratories , improvement in motor function following stroke has been confirmed. The method of administration has also been carefully studied. It has been determined that the cells will be administered around the area of stroke injury rather than directly into the middle of the stroke area. These results encourage the translation of this product from research into clinical trials for the treatment of motor deficit following stroke.
  • A stroke kills brain cells by interrupting blood flow. The most common “ischemic stroke” is due to blockage in blood flow from a clot or narrowing in an artery. Brain cells deprived of oxygen can die within minutes. The loss of physical and mental functions after stroke is often permanent and includes loss of movement, or motor, control. Stroke is the number one cause of disability, the second leading cause of dementia, and the third leading cause of death in adults. Lack of movement or motor control leads to job loss and withdrawal from pre-stroke community interactions in most patients and institutionalization in up to one-third of stroke victims. The most effective treatment for stroke, thrombolytics or “clot-busters”, can be administered only within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke. This narrow time window severely limits the number of stroke victims that may benefit from this treatment. This proposal develops a new therapy for stroke based on embryonic stem cells. Because our (and others’) laboratory research has shown that stem cells can augment the brain’s natural repair processes after stroke, these cells widen the stroke treatment opportunity by targeting the restorative or recovery phase (weeks or months after stroke instead of several hours).
  • Embryonic stem cells can grow in a culture dish, but have the ability to produce any tissue in the body. We have developed a technique that allows us to restrict the potential of embryonic stem cells to producing cell types that are found in the brain, making them “neural stem cells”. These are more appropriate for treating stroke and may have lower potential for forming tumors. When these neural stem cells are transplanted into the brains of mice or rats one week after a stroke, the animals are able to regain strength in their limbs. Based on these findings, we propose in this grant to further develop these neural stem cells into a clinical development program for stroke in humans at the end
  • of this grant period.
  • A multidisciplinary team is working rigorously to test the effectiveness of stem cell delivery in several models of stroke, while simultaneously developing processes for the precise manufacture, testing and regulatory approval of a stem cell therapy intended for human use. Each step in this process consists
  • of definite milestones that are being achieved, providing measurable assessment of progress toward therapy development. To accomplish this task, the team consists of stroke physician/scientists, pharmacologists, toxicologists, experts in FDA regulatory approval and key collaborations with a biotechnology manufacturer active in this area. This California-based team has a track record of close interactions and brings prior stroke clinical trial and basic science experience to the proposed translation of a stem cell therapy for stroke.
  • A stroke kills brain cells by interrupting blood flow. The most common “ischemic stroke” is due to blockage in blood flow from a clot or narrowing in an artery. Brain cells deprived of oxygen can die within minutes. The loss of physical and mental functions after stroke is often permanent and includes loss of movement, or motor control. Stroke is the number one cause of disability, the second leading cause of dementia, and the third leading cause of death in adults. Lack of movement or motor control leads to job loss and withdrawal from pre-stroke community interactions in most patients and institutionalization in up to one-third of stroke victims. The most effective treatment for stroke, thrombolytics or “clot-busters”, can be administered only within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke. This narrow time window severely limits the number of stroke victims that may benefit from this treatment. This proposal develops a new therapy for stroke based on embryonic stem cells. Because our (and others’) laboratory research has shown that stem cells can augment the brain’s natural repair processes after stroke, these cells widen the stroke treatment opportunity by targeting the restorative or recovery phase (weeks or months after stroke instead of several hours).
  • Embryonic stem cells can grow in a culture dish, but have the ability to produce any tissue in the body. We have developed a technique that allows us to restrict the potential of embryonic stem cells to producing cell types that are found in the brain, making them “neural stem cells”. These are more appropriate for treating stroke and may have lower potential for forming tumors. When these neural stem cells are transplanted into the brains of mice or rats one week after a stroke, the animals are able to regain strength in their limbs. Based on these findings this grant is supporting conduct of IND-enabling work to initiate a clinical development program for stroke in humans by the end of this grant period.
  • A multidisciplinary team is working rigorously to test the effectiveness of stem cell delivery in several models of stroke, while enabling precise manufacture, testing and regulatory clearance of a first in human clinical trial. Defined milestones are being achieved, providing measurable assessment of progress toward therapy development. Definitive manufacturing and pharmacology studies are underway and regulatory filings are in progress. The team consists of stroke physician/scientists, pharmacologists, toxicologists, experts in FDA regulatory and key collaborations with a biotechnology manufacturer active in this area. This California-based team has a track record of close interactions and brings prior stroke clinical trial and basic science experience to the proposed translation of a stem cell therapy for stroke.
  • A stroke kills brain cells by interrupting blood flow. The most common 'ischemic stroke' is due to blockage in blood flow from a clot or narrowing in an artery. Brain cells deprived of oxygen can die within minutes. The loss of physical and mental functions after stroke is often permanent and includes loss of movement, or motor, control. Stroke is the number one cause of disability, the second leading cause of dementia, and the third leading cause of death in adults. Lack of movement or motor control leads to job loss and withdrawal from pre-stroke community interactions in most patients and institutionalization in up to one-third of stroke victims. The most effective treatment for stroke, thrombolytics or 'clot-busters', can be administered only within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke. This narrow time window severely limits the number of stroke victims that may benefit from this treatment. This proposal develops a new therapy for stroke based on embryonic stem cells. Because our (and others') laboratory research has shown that stem cells can augment the brain's natural repair processes after stroke, these cells widen the stroke treatment opportunity by targeting the restorative or recovery phase (weeks or months after stroke instead of several hours).
  • Embryonic stem cells can grow in a culture dish, but have the ability to produce any tissue in the body. We have developed a technique that allows us to restrict the potential of embryonic stem cells to producing cell types that are found in the brain, making them 'neural stem cells'. These are more appropriate for treating stroke and may have lower potential for forming tumors. When these neural stem cells are transplanted into the brains of mice or rats one week after a stroke, the animals are able to regain strength in their limbs. Based on these findings this grant is supporting conduct of IND-enabling work to initiate a clinical development program for stroke in humans by the end of this grant period.
  • A multidisciplinary team is working to test the effectiveness of stem cell delivery in several models of stroke, while enabling precise manufacture, testing and regulatory clearance of a first in human clinical trial. Defined milestones are being achieved, providing measurable assessment of progress toward therapy development. Definitive manufacturing and pharmacology studies are underway and regulatory filings are in progress. The team consists of stroke physicians/scientists, pharmacologists, toxicologists, experts in FDA regulatory and key collaborations with a biotechnology manufacturer active in this area. This California-based team has a track record of close interactions and brings prior stroke clinical trial and basic science experience to the proposed translation of a stem cell therapy for stroke.
  • PUBLIC SUMMARY OF SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS
  • A stroke kills brain cells by interrupting blood flow. The most common “ischemic stroke” is due to blockage in blood flow from a clot or narrowing in an artery. Brain cells deprived of oxygen can die
  • within minutes. The loss of physical and mental functions after stroke is often permanent and includes loss of movement, or motor, control. Stroke is the number one cause of disability, the second leading
  • cause of dementia, and the third leading cause of death in adults. Lack of movement or motor control leads to job loss and withdrawal from pre-stroke community interactions in most patients and
  • institutionalization in up to one-third of stroke victims. The most effective treatment for stroke, thrombolytics or “clot-busters”, can be administered only within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke. This
  • narrow time window severely limits the number of stroke victims that may benefit from this treatment. This proposal develops a new therapy for stroke based on embryonic stem cells. Because
  • our (and others’) laboratory research has shown that stem cells can augment the brain’s natural repair processes after stroke, these cells widen the stroke treatment opportunity by targeting the
  • restorative or recovery phase (weeks or months after stroke instead of several hours).
  • Embryonic stem cells can grow in a culture dish, but have the ability to produce any tissue in the body. We have developed a technique that allows us to restrict the potential of embryonic stem cells
  • to producing cell types that are found in the brain, making them “neural stem cells”. These are more appropriate for treating stroke and may have lower potential for forming tumors. When these neural stem cells are transplanted into the brains of mice or rats one week after a stroke, the animals are able to regain strength in their limbs. Based on these findings this grant is supporting conduct of IND-enabling work to initiate a clinical development program for stroke in humans by the end of this grant period.
  • A multidisciplinary team is working to test the effectiveness of stem cell delivery in several models of stroke, while enabling precise manufacture, testing and regulatory clearance of a first in human clinical trial. Defined milestones are being achieved, providing measurable assessment of progress toward therapy development. Definitive manufacturing and pharmacology studies are underway and regulatory filings are in progress. The team consists of stroke physician/scientists, pharmacologists, toxicologists, experts in FDA regulatory and key collaborations with a biotechnology manufacturer active in this area. This California-based team has a track record of close interactions and brings prior stroke clinical trial and basic science experience to the proposed translation of a stem cell therapy for stroke.
Funding Type: 
Early Translational IV
Grant Number: 
TR4-06788-B
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 124 000
Disease Focus: 
Stroke
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 

The goal of this project is to produce a stem cell-based therapy for stroke (also known as an ischemic cerebral infarct). Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA, and a leading cause of disability among adults. Currently, there are no effective treatments once a stroke has occurred (termed completed stroke). In this proposal, we aim to develop human stem cells for therapeutic transplantation to treat stroke. Potential benefits will outweigh risks because only patients with severe strokes that have compromised activities of daily living to an extreme degree will initially be treated. Using a novel approach, we will generate stem cells that do not form tumors, but instead only make new nerve cells. We will give drugs to avoid rejection of the transplanted cells. Thus, the treatment should be safe. We will first test the cells in stroke models in rodents (mice and rats) in preparation for a human clinical trial. We will collect comprehensive data on the mice and rats to determine if the stem cells indeed become new nerve cells to replace the damaged tissue and to assess if the behavior of the mice and rats has improved. If successfully developed and commercialized, this approach has the potential for revolutionizing stroke therapy.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

The goal of this project is to produce a stem cell-based therapy for stroke (also known as an ischemic cerebral infarct). Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the State of California, and a leading cause of disability among adults. Currently, there are no effective treatments once a stroke has occurred (termed completed stroke), and the quality of life is severely compromised in those that survive the malady. In this proposal, we aim to develop human stem cells for therapeutic transplantation to treat stroke. Using a novel approach, we will generate stem cells that do not form tumors, but instead only make new nerve cells. If successfully developed and commercialized, this approach could provide a therapeutic candidate for the unmet medical need, which would have a tremendous impact on the quality of life for the patient, his or her family, and for the economic and emotional burden on the State of California and its citizens.

Funding Type: 
Early Translational IV
Grant Number: 
TR4-06788-A
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 124 000
Disease Focus: 
Stroke
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

The goal of this project is to produce a stem cell-based therapy for stroke (also known as an ischemic cerebral infarct). Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA, and a leading cause of disability among adults. Currently, there are no effective treatments once a stroke has occurred (termed completed stroke). In this proposal, we aim to develop human stem cells for therapeutic transplantation to treat stroke. Potential benefits will outweigh risks because only patients with severe strokes that have compromised activities of daily living to an extreme degree will initially be treated. Using a novel approach, we will generate stem cells that do not form tumors, but instead only make new nerve cells. We will give drugs to avoid rejection of the transplanted cells. Thus, the treatment should be safe. We will first test the cells in stroke models in rodents (mice and rats) in preparation for a human clinical trial. We will collect comprehensive data on the mice and rats to determine if the stem cells indeed become new nerve cells to replace the damaged tissue and to assess if the behavior of the mice and rats has improved. If successfully developed and commercialized, this approach has the potential for revolutionizing stroke therapy.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

The goal of this project is to produce a stem cell-based therapy for stroke (also known as an ischemic cerebral infarct). Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the State of California, and a leading cause of disability among adults. Currently, there are no effective treatments once a stroke has occurred (termed completed stroke), and the quality of life is severely compromised in those that survive the malady. In this proposal, we aim to develop human stem cells for therapeutic transplantation to treat stroke. Using a novel approach, we will generate stem cells that do not form tumors, but instead only make new nerve cells. If successfully developed and commercialized, this approach could provide a therapeutic candidate for the unmet medical need, which would have a tremendous impact on the quality of life for the patient, his or her family, and for the economic and emotional burden on the State of California and its citizens.

Progress Report: 
  • Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA and remains a great medical problem in California. Currently, there is no effective treatment for patients with a stroke who are seen several hours after the event. The goal of this project is to establish the feasibility of using a stem cell line for cell-replacement therapy to target stroke (cerebral ischemia). Using a novel, genetic pre-programming approach, we will generate human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSC/NPCs) that are resistant to apoptotic cell death and destined to become nerve cells (or neurons). Our approach also avoids tumor formation, which can occur if stem cells that are not programmed to become neurons are injected into the brain. We will achieve our goals by introducing a constitutively active form of the transcription factor MEF2C (MEF2CA) into human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived hNPCs. For this purpose it is critical to identify a viral vector system that is the safest and most effective in producing MEF2CA-programmed hNPCs. We decided to use an adenoviral-associated virus (AAV) vector system because unlike other viral delivery methods (e.g., lentiviral, retroviral), an AAV system allows us to achieve MEF2CA expression in an integration-free and transient manner, as required for proper neuronal differentiation from NPCs. After in vitro characterization of these cells, including their neurogenic capacity, scalability etc., we will transplant them into rodent models of focal stroke. We are analyzing transplanted rats with immunohistochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral methods to determine whether MEF2CA-programmed hNPCs can successfully differentiate into functional, integrated neurons into the host brain and ameliorate stroke-induced behavioral deficits. To assess the robustness of the AAV approach, we will also compare the results obtained from this system to those obtained using a hESC line that is stably programmed (resulting in permanent insertion of the MEF2C transgene into the genome of the cell, as opposed to transient MEF2C expression achieved with the AAV system). These studies will allow us to determine the effectiveness of the integration-free AAV system vs. stable integration of MEF2C on hNPCs developed for cell replacement therapy. During the current reporting period (Year 01), we have efficiently produced an AAV vector that transduces the MEF2CA transgene into hESC-derived NPCs. FACS analysis revealed that we have robustly infected the hNPCs with this AAV-based construct (~95% of cells infected). In vitro evaluation for protein and mRNA (through immunocytochemistry, and qRT-PCR assays) from the cells infected with AAV-MEF2CA revealed their neural progenitor cell identity and that the MEF2CA transgene is active in these cells. We have begun to transplant these cells into the brain of the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rat model of focal stroke. We have begun to compare the effects in stroke of the AAV-MEF2CA and stable-MEF2CA cell lines. In vitro characterization of the stable MEF2CA stem cell line demonstrated that we can differentiate these hNPCs into neurons. For example, protein, mRNA, and morphological analyses revealed robust differentiation of these hNPCs into mature cerebrocortical neurons. Electrophysiological analysis further confirmed the expression of functional neuronal channels and synaptic currents. Behavioral evaluation performed 12-weeks after transplant into the stroked brain with the stable-MEF2CA hNPC line vs. control revealed promising behavioral improvements in the MEF2CA-NPC transplanted group compared to control without apparent side effects.
Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05676
Investigator: 
Name: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 654 830
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Approximately 5,600 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with ALS each year. The incidence of ALS is two per 100,000 people, and it is estimated that as many as 30,000 Americans may have the disease at any given time. There are no effective therapies of ALS to-date. Recent genetic discoveries have pinpointed mutations that lead to the aberrant function of two proteins that bind to RNA transcripts in neurons. Misregulation of these RNA binding proteins is responsible for the aberrant levels and processing of hundreds of RNA representing genes that are important for neuronal survival and function. In this proposal, we will use neurons generated from patient cells that harbor the mutations in these RNA binding proteins to (1) prioritize a RNA “signature” unique to neurons suffering from the toxic function of these proteins and (2) as an abundant source of raw material to enable high-throughput screens of drug-like compounds that will bypass the mutations in the proteins and “correct” the RNA signature to resemble that of a healthy neuron. If successful, our unconventional approach that uses hundreds of parallel measurements of specific RNA events, will identify drugs that will treat ALS patients.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Our research aims to develop drug-like compounds that are aimed to treat Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), which may be applicable to other neurological diseases that heavily impact Californians, such as Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The cellular resources and genomic assays that we are developing in this research will have great potential for future research and can be applied to other disease areas. The cells, in particular will be beneficial to California health care patients, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries in terms of improved human models for drug discovery and toxicology testing. Our improved knowledge base will support our efforts as well as other Californian researchers to study stem cell models of neurological disease and design new diagnostics and treatments, thereby maintaining California's position as a leader in clinical research.

Progress Report: 
  • Our research aims to develop drug-like compounds that are aimed to treat Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), which may be applicable to other neurological diseases that heavily impact Californians, such as Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. In the first year, we have succeeded in improving the efficiency of motor neuron differentiation to generate high-quality motor neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells. We have generated RNA signatures from motor neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells from normal, healthy individuals whereby key proteins implicated in ALS are depleted using RNAi technology. We have also generated motor neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells that contained mutations in these key proteins and are in the process of applying genomic technologies to compare these cells to ones where we have depleted the proteins themselves. In parallel, we have started to optimize conditions for a small molecule screen to identify previously FDA-approved compounds that may alter aberrant and ALS-associated phenotypes in human cell lines.
  • In this reporting period, we have successfully generated lines that we have used to identify small molecules that alter the formation of aggregates in human neural progenitors and non-neuronal cell lines. These molecules will be tested for the reversal of aberrant RNA signatures in motor neurons from patients with ALS-associated mutations.
Funding Type: 
Early Translational IV
Grant Number: 
TR4-06847
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 333 795
Disease Focus: 
Huntington's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

The long-term objective of this project is to develop a drug to treat Huntington’s disease (HD), the most common inherited neurodegenerative disorder. Characterized by involuntary movements, personality changes and dementia, HD is a devastatingly progressive disease that results in death 10–20 years after disease onset and diagnosis. No therapy presently exists for HD; therefore, this project is highly innovative and ultimately aims to deliver something transformative for the HD patient population. The specific goal of the proposed research will be to achieve preclinical proof-of-concept with a novel small molecule that binds to and ameliorates the neurotoxicity of the mutant huntingtin (mHtt) protein that causes HD. Rationale for development of such compounds comes from previous research that found that mHtt assumes a shape that is selectively toxic to neurons, and that small molecules that disrupt this shape can reduce mHtt’s toxicity in primary neurons. Critical to the proposed studies will be assays that employ human striatal neurons derived from adult and juvenile HD patients and generated with induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology. These HD i-neurons display many characteristics that are also observed in striatal neurons of HD patients, including reduced survival times. They provide the most genetically precise preclinical system available to test for both drug efficacy and safety.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

The long-term objective of this project is to develop a first-in-class, disease-modifying drug to treat Huntington’s disease (HD), a devastatingly progressive genetic disorder that results in death 10–20 years after disease onset and diagnosis. No therapy presently exists for HD; therefore, this highly innovative project aims to deliver a medical breakthrough that will provide significant benefit for California’s estimated > 2000 HD patients and the family members, friends and medical system that care for them. The proposed research will be performed at a biotechnology startup, a leading academic research center and two contract research organizations, all of which are California-based. The work will over time involve more than 10 California scientists, thereby helping to employ tax-paying citizens and maintain the State’s advanced technical base. Finally, an effective, proprietary drug for the treatment of HD is expected to be highly valuable and to attract favorable financial terms upon out-licensing for development and commercialization. These revenues would flow to the California companies and institutions (including CIRM) that would have a stake in the proceeds.

Progress Report: 
  • The long-term objective for this project was to develop a first-in-class, disease-modifying drug to treat Huntington's disease (HD). This drug would comprise a small molecule that binds to and ameliorates the neurotoxicity of the mutant huntingtin protein (mHtt) that causes HD.
  • The goal of the research conducted under the CIRM Award was to demonstrate development candidate feasibility in vitro with a novel small molecule mHtt detoxifier early lead compound that is potent and efficacious in neurons from HD patients generated using stem cell technology (HD i-neurons) as well as suitable for use in mice as experimental models for HD.
  • The original project strategy was to 1) acquire or synthesize new samples of compounds identified as potential mHtt detoxifiers in the screening campaign conducted 7 years ago; 2) establish or re-establish the cell-free and cultured neuron biological assays needed to characterize potential small molecule mHtt detoxifiers (this work was carried out in the laboratory of our collaborator, Dr. Steven Finkbeiner of the J. David Gladstone Institutes); 3) acquire or synthesize new/novel analogs of the initial hits; 4) test new/novel compounds for activity in a cell-free assay for potential mHtt detoxifier activity; 5) test hits for efficacy in HD and non-HD i-neurons; and 6) profile the in vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetics and absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (PK/ADME) profiles of compounds that displayed selective neuroprotection toward HD i-neurons.
  • Specific achievements of the first year of the Project include:
  • • Acquiring 205 previously identified hits or analogs thereof from commercial sources;
  • • Synthesizing an additional 84 novel, designed analogs;
  • • Generating the reagents, re-establishing and implementing the screening assay;
  • • Testing all compounds acquired or synthesized in the screening assay;
  • • Establishing a counterscreen for false positives in the screening assay;
  • • Preliminary screening 48 previously reported hits in the counterscreen;
  • • Testing 14 previously or newly identified hits side-by-side in full concentration-response assays in both the screening and counterscreening assays;
  • • Profiling 11 diverse hits in in vitro PK/ADME assays;
  • • Testing 17 compounds for their ability to ameliorate neurotoxicity in a rodent primary neuron model; and
  • • Preliminary testing 2 previously identified hits in human HD i-neurons.
  • Unfortunately and surprisingly, we observed that all compounds displayed essentially identical profiles in full concentration-response studies in both the screening and counterscreening assays. We interpret this result to indicate that these compounds and structurally related compounds that we considered to be most promising and tested do not in fact bind to mHtt, i.e., they are all false positives. Since no valid starting points exist for continued work, the Project will be terminated after the first award period.
Funding Type: 
Tissue Collection for Disease Modeling
Grant Number: 
IT1-06611
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$874 135
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Most children who go to the clinic with brain disorders have symptoms combining autism, cerebral palsy and epilepsy, suggesting underlying and shared mechanisms of brain dysfunction in these conditions. Such disorders affect 4-6% of the population with life-long disease, and account for about 10% of health care expenditures in the US. Genetic studies have pointed to frequent low-penetrant or low-frequency genetic alterations, but there is no clear way to use this information to make gene-specific diagnosis, to predict short- or long-term prognosis or to develop disease-specific therapy. We propose to recruit about 500 patients with these disorders mostly from our Children’s Hospital, through a dedicated on-site collaborative approach. Extracting from existing medical records, taking advantage of years of experience in recruitment and stem cell generation, and already existing or planned whole exome or genome sequencing on most patients, we propose a safe, anonymous database linked to meaningful biological, medical, radiographic and genetic data. Because team members will be at the hospital, we can adjust future disease-specific recruitment goals depending upon scientific priorities, and re-contact patients if necessary. The clinical data, coupled with the proposed hiPSC lines, represents a platform for cell-based disease investigation and therapeutic discovery, with benefits to the children of California.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

This project can benefit Californians both in financial and non-financial terms. NeuroDevelopmental Disabilities (NDDs) affect 4-6% of Californians, create a huge disease burden estimated to account for 10% of California health care costs, and have no definitive treatments. Because we cannot study brain tissue directly, it is extraordinarily difficult to arrive at a specific diagnosis for affected children, so doctors are left ordering costly and low-yield tests, which limit prognostic information, counseling, prevention strategies, quality of life, and impede initiation of potentially beneficial therapies. Easily obtainable skin cells from Californians will be the basis of this project, so the study results will have maximal relevance to our own population. By combining “disease in a dish” platforms with cutting edge genomics, we can improve diagnosis and treatments for Californians and their families suffering from neurodevelopmental disorders.
Additionally, this project, more than others, will help Californians financially because: 1] The ongoing evaluations of this group of patients utilizes medical diagnostics and genetic sequencing tools developed and manufactured in California, increasing our state revenues. 2] The strategy to develop “disease in a dish” projects centered on Neurodevelopmental Disabilities supports opportunities for ongoing efforts of California-based pharmaceutical and life sciences companies to leverage these discoveries for future therapies.

Progress Report: 
  • Childhood Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (NDDs) affect approximately 12% of children in the US, and account for >5% of total healthcare costs. The ability to use induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to incorporate characteristics of patient cells into models that predict patient disease characteristics and clinical outcomes can have a major impact on care for the children with these conditions. We have proposed to ascertain pediatric patient samples which represent a range of NDDs including Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), Intellectual Disability (ID), Cerebral Palsy (CP) and Epilepsy for iPSC banking. These disorders were chosen because they have high heritability rates but remain genetically complex, and therefore, will greatly benefit from further in-depth study using iPSCs
  • To date we have enrolled 128 patients (72 affected patients, 56 healthy control patients) representing a range of racial and ethnic backgrounds (39% White, 2% Black, 2% Asian, 57% Arabic/Middle Eastern) and both genders (52% Male, 48% Female). The patients in the affected patient group carry a primary diagnosis of one of the NDD disease categories (19% Autism Spectrum Disorder, 44% Epilepsy, 28% Intellectual Disability, 9% Cerebral Palsy). Approximately half of the patients are comorbid for one or more of the other disorders. The control patients consist of healthy family members of the affected patient group. Since family members share many common DNA features this will help us better identify and hone in on disease causing variants more effectively.
  • iPSC lines have not yet been returned from these patients so there are no research results to report at this time. We are continuing with our recruitment efforts to reach our goal of 450 affected patients and 100 healthy controls.

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