Heart Disease

Coding Dimension ID: 
295
Coding Dimension path name: 
Heart Disease

Improving Existing Drugs for Long QT Syndrome type 3 (LQT3) by hiPSC Disease-in-Dish Model

Funding Type: 
Early Translational IV
Grant Number: 
TR4-06857
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$6 361 618
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
This project uses patient hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to develop a safe and effective drug to treat a serious heart health condition. This research and product development will provide a novel method for a human genetic heart disorder characterized by long delay (long Q-T interval) between heart beats caused by mutations in the Na+ channel α subunit. Certain patients are genetically predisposed to a potentially fatal arrhythmogenic response to existing drugs to treat LQT3 since the drugs have off-target effects on other important ion channels in cardiomyocytes. We will use patient-derived hiPSC-cardiomyocytes to develop a safer drug (development candidate, DC) that will retain efficacy against the "leaky" Na+-channel yet minimize off-target effects in particular against the K+ hERG channel that can be responsible for the existing drug’s pro-arrhythmic effect. Since this problem is thought to occur severely in patients with the common KCHN2 variant, K897T (~33% of the white population), removing the off-target liability addresses a serious unmet clinical need. Futher, since we propose to modify an existing drug (i.e., do drug rescue), the path from patient-specific hiPSCs to clinic might be easier than for a completely new chemical entity. Lastly, an appealing aspect is that the hiPSCs were derived from a child to test his therapy, & we aim to produce a better drug for his treatment. Our goal is to complete development of the DC and initiate IND-enabling in vivo studies.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
In the US, an estimated 850,000 adults are hospitalized for arrhythmias each year, making arrhythmias one of the top five causes of healthcare expenditures in the US with a direct cost of more than $40 billion annually for diagnosis, treatment & rehabilitation. The State of California has approximately 12% of the US population which translates to 102,000 individuals hospitalized every year for arrhythmias. Another 30,000 Californians die of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome every year. Arrhythmias are very common in older adults and because the population of California is aging, research to address this issue is important for human health and the State economy. Most serious arrhythmias affect people older than 60. This is because older adults are more likely to have heart disease & other health problems that can lead to arrhythmias. Older adults also tend to be more sensitive to the side effects of medicines, some of which can cause arrhythmias. Some medicines used to treat arrhythmias can even cause arrhythmias as a side effect. In the US, atrial fibrillation (a common type of arrhythmia that can cause problems) affects millions of people & the number is rising. Accordingly, the same problem is present in California. Thus, successful completion of this work will not only provide citizens of California much needed advances in cardiovascular health technology & improvement in health care but an improved heart drug. This will provide high paying jobs & significant tax revenue.
Progress Report: 
  • The project objective is to design, synthesize and test a sodium-channel inhibitor analog that selectively inhibits the sodium channel and not the potassium channel in patient-derived IPSCs. The strategy is to first work out the approach with wild-type human IPSCs in advance of the patient-derived cells. The status is that the milestones for Year 1 have largely been accomplished. The achievements for this reporting period include nearly locking down the IPSC protocol, developing ultra high throughput kinetic analysis of human cardiomyocytes, developing an enantioselective synthesis of sodium-channel inhibitors and analogs and identifying from a pool of only 49 compounds, a promising sodium-channel inhibitor that provides insight into selective sodium channel inhibition.

The CIRM Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Biorepository – A Resource for Safe Storage and Distribution of High Quality iPSCs

Funding Type: 
hPSC Repository
Grant Number: 
IR1-06600
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$9 999 834
Disease Focus: 
Developmental Disorders
Heart Disease
Infectious Disease
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Autism
Respiratory Disorders
Vision Loss
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Critical to the long term success of the CIRM iPSC Initiative of generating and ensuring the availability of high quality disease-specific human IPSC lines is the establishment and successful operation of a biorepository with proven methods for quality control, safe storage and capabilities for worldwide distribution of high quality, highly-characterized iPSCs. Specifically the biorepository will be responsible for receipt, expansion, quality characterization, safe storage and distribution of human pluripotent stem cells generated by the CIRM stem cell initiative. This biobanking resource will ensure the availability of the highest quality hiPSC resources for researchers to use in disease modeling, target discovery and drug discovery and development for prevalent, genetically complex diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients and subsequently, the ability to differentiate these iPSCs into disease-relevant cell types holds great promise in facilitating the “disease-in-a-dish” approach for studying our understanding of the pathological mechanisms of human disease. iPSCs have already proven to be a useful model for several monogenic diseases such as Parkinson’s, Fragile X Syndrome, Schizophrenia, Spinal Muscular Atrophy, and inherited metabolic diseases such as 1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial hypercholesterolemia, and glycogen storage disease. In addition, the differentiated cells obtained from iPSCs represent a renewable, disease-relevant cell model for high-throughput drug screening and toxicology/safety assessment which will ultimately lead to the successful development of new therapeutic agents. iPSCs also hold great hope for advancing the use of live cells as therapies for correcting the physiological manifestations caused by disease or injury.
Progress Report: 
  • The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Biorepository is operated by the Coriell Institute for Medical Research and is a critical component of the CIRM Human Stem Cell Initiative. The overall goal of this initiative is to generate, for world-wide use by non-profit and for-profit entities, high quality, disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). These cells are derived from existing tissues such as blood or skin, and are genetically manipulated in the laboratory to change into cells that resemble embryonic stem cells. iPSCs can be grown indefinitely in the Petri dish and have the remarkable capability to be converted into most of the major cell types in the body including neurons, heart cells, and liver cells. This ability makes iPSCs an exceptional resource for disease modeling as well as for drug screening. The expectation is that these cells will be a major benefit to the process for understanding prevalent, genetically complex diseases and in developing innovative therapeutics.
  • The Coriell CIRM iPSC Biorepository, located at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, CA, is funded through a competitive grant award to Coriell from CIRM and is managed by Mr. Matt Self under the supervision of the Program Director, Dr. Steven Madore, Director of Molecular Biology at Coriell. The Biorepository will receive biospecimens consisting of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and skin biopsies obtained from donors recruited by seven Tissue Collector grant awardees. These biospecimens will serve as the starting material for iPSC derivation by Cellular Dynamics, Inc (CDI). Under a contractual agreement with Coriell, CDI will expand each iPSC line to generate sufficient aliquots of high quality cryopreserved cells for distribution via the Coriell on-line catalogue. Aliquots of frozen cell lines and iPSCs will be stored in liquid nitrogen vapor in storage units at the Buck Institute with back-up aliquots stored in a safe off-site location.
  • Renovation and construction of the Biorepository began at the Buck Institute in late January. The Biorepository Manger was hired March 1 and after installation of cryogenic storage vessels and alarm validation, the first biospecimens were received on April 30, 2014. Additionally, Coriell has developed a Clinical Information Management System (CIMS) for storing all clinical and demographic data associated with enrolled subjects. Tissue Collectors utilize CIMS via a web interface to upload and edit the subject demographic and clinical information that will ultimately be made available, along with the iPSCs, via Coriell’s on-line catalogue
  • As of November 1 specimens representing a total of 725 unique individuals have been received at the Biorepository. These samples include PBMCs obtained from 550 unique individuals, skin biopsies from 72 unique individuals, and 103 primary dermal fibroblast cultures previously prepared in the laboratories of the CIRM Tissue Collectors. A total of 280 biospecimen samples have been delivered to CDI for the purpose of iPSC derivation. The Biorepository is anticipating delivery of the first batches of iPSCs for distribution in early 2015. These lines, along with the associated clinical data, will become available to scientists via the on-line Coriell catalogue. The CIRM Coriell iPSC Biorepository will ensure safe long-term storage and distribution of high quality iPSCs.

Preclinical evaluation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitors

Funding Type: 
New Faculty Physician Scientist
Grant Number: 
RN3-06378
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 930 388
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Because the regenerative capacity of adult heart is limited, any substantial cell loss as a result of a heart attack is mostly irreversible and may lead to progressive heart failure. Human pluripotent stem cells can be differentiated to heart cells, but their properties when transplanted into an injured heart remain unresolved. We propose to perform preclinical evaluation for transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac cells into the injured heart of an appropriate animal model. However, an important issue that has limited the progress to clinical use is their fate upon transplantation; that is whether they are capable of integrating into their new environment or they will function in isolation at their own pace. As an analogy, the performance of a symphony can go into chaos if one member plays in isolation from all surrounding cues. Therefore, it is important to determine if the transplanted cells can beat in harmony with the rest of the heart and if these cells will provide functional benefit to the injured heart. We plan to isolate cardiac cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells, transplant them into the model’s injured heart, determine if they result in improvement of the heart function, and perform detailed electrophysiology studies to determine their integration into the host tissue. The success of the proposed project will set the platform for future clinical trails of stem cell therapy for heart disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Heart disease remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the US with an estimated annual cost of over $300 billion. In California alone, more than 70,000 people die every year from cardiovascular diseases. Despite major advancement in treatments for patients with heart failure, which is mainly due to cellular loss upon myocardial injury, the mortality rate remains high. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) could provide an attractive therapeutic option to treat patients with damaged heart. We propose to isolate heart cells from hESCs and transplant them in an injured animal model's heart and study their fate. In the process, we will develop reagents that can be highly valuable for future research and clinical studies. The reagents generated in these studies can be patented forming an intellectual property portfolio shared by the state and the institution where the research is carried out. Most importantly, the research that is proposed in this application could lead to future stem cell-based therapies that would restore heart function after a heart attack. We expect that California hospitals and health care entities will be first in line for trials and therapies. Thus, California will benefit economically and it will help advance novel medical care.
Progress Report: 
  • Identification and isolation of pure cardiac cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells has proven to be a difficult task. We have designed a method to genetically engineer human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to harbor a label that is expressed during sequential maturation of cardiac cells. This will allow us to prospectively isolate cardiac cells at different stages of development for further characterization and transplantation. Using this method, we have screened proteins that are expressed on the surface of cells as markers. Using antibodies against these surface markers allows for isolation of these cells using cell sorting techniques. Thus far, we have identified two surface markers that can be used to isolate early cardiac progenitors. Using these markers, we have enriched for cardiac cells from differentiating hESCs and have characterized their properties in the dish as well as in small animals. We plan to transplant these cells in large animal models and monitor their survival, expansion and their integration into the host myocardium. Molecular imaging techniques are used to track these cells upon transplantation.

A new paradigm of lineage-specific reprogramming

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-06035
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 708 560
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Directly Reprogrammed Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Recently, we devised and reported a new regenerative medicine paradigm that entails temporal/transient overexpression of induced pluripotent stem cell based reprogramming factors in skin cells, leading to the rapid generation of “activated” cells, which can then be directed by specific growth factors and small molecules to “relax” back into various defined and homogenous tissue-specific precursor cell types (including nervous cells, heart cells, blood vessel cells, and pancreas and liver progenitor cells), which can be expanded and further differentiated into mature cells entirely distinct from fibroblasts. In this proposal, combined with small molecules that can functionally replace reprogramming transcription factors as well as substantially improve reprogramming efficiency and kinetics, we aim to further develop and mechanistically characterize chemically defined, non-integrating approaches (e.g., mRNA, miRNA, episomal plasmids and/or small molecule-based) to robustly and efficiently reprogram skin fibroblast cells into expandable heart precursor cells. Specifically, we will: determine if we can use non-integrating methods to destabilize human fibroblasts and facilitate their direct reprogramming into the heart precursor cells; characterize of heart cells generated by the direct programming methods, both in the tissue culture dish and in a mouse model of heart attack; and characterize newly identified reprogramming enhancing small molecules mechanistically.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This study will develop and mechanistically characterize a new method of generating safe patient specific heart cells that could be useful in treating heart failure which afflicts millions of Californians and accounts for billions of dollars in healthcare spending annually. Additionally, the small molecules discovered in this study could be good candidates for future drug development as well as being broadly useful for other regenerative medicine applications. These advances could also be a platform for new personalized medicine/ cell banking businesses which could bring economic growth in addition to improving the health of Californians.
Progress Report: 
  • During the reporting period, we have made very significant progress toward the following research aims: (1) Using the Oct4-based reprogramming assay system established, we were able to screen for and identify small molecules that can replace the other three genes in the Cell-Activation and Signaling-Directed (CASD) lineage conversion paradigm for reprogramming fibroblasts into cardiac lineage. (2) Using in-depth assays, we have examined the process using lineage-tracing methods and characterized those Oct4/small molecules-reprogrammed cardiac cells in vitro. (3) Most importantly, we were able to identify a baseline condition that appears to reprogram human fibroblasts into cardiac cells using defined conditions.

Epigenetic regulation of human cardiac differentiation

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-05901
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 708 560
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Each cell type in our body has its own identity. This identity allows a heart cell to contract repetitively, and a brain cell to conduct nerve impulses. Each cell type gains its identity by turning on or off thousands of genes that together give the cell its identity. Understanding how these sets of genes are regulated together as a cell gains its identity is important to be able to generate new cells in disease. For example, after a heart attack, heart muscle dies, leaving scar tissue and a poorly functioning heart. It would be very useful to be able to make new heart muscle by introducing the right set of instructions into other cells in the heart, and turn them into new heart muscle cells. One way that many genes are turned on or off together is by a cellular mechanism called epigenetic regulation. This global regulation coordinates thousands of genes. We plan to understand the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that give a human heart muscle cell its identity. Understanding their epigenetic blueprint of cardiac muscle cells will help develop strategies for cardiac regeneration, and for a deeper understanding of how cells in our body acquire their individual identities and function.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This research will benefit the state of California and its citizens by helping develop new approaches to cardiac regeneration that will be more efficient than current approaches, and amenable to drug-based approaches. In addition, the knowledge acquired in these studies will be important not only for heart disease, but for any other disease where reprogramming to regenerate new cells is desirable. The mechanisms revealed by this research will also lead to new understanding of the basis for congenital heart defects, which affect several thousand Californian children every year, and for which we understand very little.
Progress Report: 
  • We have made considerable progress on this project, which is aimed at understanding how genes are controlled during the conversion of human stem cells into heart cells. We have been able to use advanced techniques that allow us to make millions of human heart cells in a dish from "Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells" (known as iPS cells), which are cells derived from skin cells that have properties of embryonic stem cells. We are now using genome engineering techniques to insert a mutation that is associated with human congenital heart defects. We are now starting to map the chromatin marks that will tell us how heart genes are turned on, while genes belonging to other cell types are kept off. This "blueprint" of a heart cell will help us understand how to make better heart cells to repair injured hearts, and will allow us to model human congenital heart disease in a human experimental system.

Allogeneic Cardiac-Derived Stem Cells for Patients Following a Myocardial Infarction

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Development - Research
Grant Number: 
DR2A-05735
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$19 782 136
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
The proposed research will demonstrate both safety and efficacy of a heart-derived stem cell product in patients who have experienced a heart attack either recently or in the past by conducting a mid-stage clinical trial. A prior early-stage trial showed that the product can repair damaged portions of the heart after a heart attack in ways that no commercial therapy currently can. Damaged areas turn irreversibly into scar tissue after the initial event, which can predispose a person to future events and lead to an ongoing worsening of general and heart health. Data from the early-stage trial suggest that treatment with the heart-derived cell product under development can turn scar tissue back into healthy heart muscle. The planned mid-stage trial will hopefully confirm that finding in a larger patient group and provide additional data to support the safety profile of the product. The product is manufactured using heart tissue obtained from a healthy donor and can be used in most other individuals. Its effect is thought to be long-lasting (months-years) although it is expected to be cleared from the body relatively quickly (weeks-months). Treatment is administered during a single brief procedure, requiring a local anesthetic and insertion of a tube (or catheter) into the heart. The overriding goal for the product is to prevent patients who have had a heart attack from deteriorating over time and developing heart failure, a condition which is defined by the heart’s inability to pump blood efficiently and one which affects millions of Americans. Successful completion of the proposed mid-stage trial would lead next to a final, confirmatory trial and then to the application process by which permission to market the product is obtained from the Food and Drug Administration. The end result could be an affordable stem cell therapy effective as part of a treatment regimen after a heart attack.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The manufacturer of the heart-derived stem cell product under development is a California-based small company who currently employs 7 California residents. Five new local jobs will be created to support the proposed project. Three medical centers located in California will participate in the proposed mid-stage clinical trial. The trial will hopefully bring notoriety to both the company and the medical centers involved while at the same time provide a novel therapeutic option for the many citizens of California afflicted with heart disease. Recent statistics place California among the 50% of states with the highest death rates for heart disease. Therefore, a successfully developed cell product could have a meaningful impact on the home population. Furthermore, as manufacturing needs grow to accommodate the demands of early commercialization, the company anticipates generating 100+ new biotech jobs.
Progress Report: 
  • This project aims to demonstrate both safety and efficacy of a heart-derived cell product in patients who have experienced a heart attack either recently or in the past by conducting a mid-stage (Phase II) clinical trial. The cell product is manufactured using heart tissue obtained from a healthy donor and can be used in most other individuals. Its effect is thought to be long-lasting (months-years) although it is expected to be cleared from the body relatively quickly (weeks-months). Treatment is administered during a single brief procedure, requiring a local anesthetic and insertion of a tube (or catheter) into the heart. The overriding goal for the product is to prevent patients who have had a heart attack from deteriorating over time and developing heart failure, a condition which is defined by the heart’s inability to pump blood efficiently and one which affects millions of Americans. At the outset of the project, a Phase I trial was underway. By the close of the current reporting period, the Phase 1 trial had reached its main safety endpoint, and the Phase II trial was approved to proceed. Fourteen patients were treated with the heart-derived cell product as part of Phase I. The safety endpoint for the trial was pre-defined and took into consideration the following: inflammation in the heart accompanied by an immune response, death due to abnormal heart rhythms, sudden death, repeat heart attack, treatment for symptoms of heart failure, need for a heart assist device, and need for a heart transplant. Both an independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) and CIRM agreed that Phase I met its safety endpoint and that Phase II was approved to proceed. The Phase I participants continue to be monitored for safety and efficacy. Meanwhile, the manufacturing processes established to create cell products for use in Phase I, were employed to create cell products in anticipation of Phase II. A supply of products was readied for use in Phase II. Also in anticipation of Phase II, a number of clinical sites were readied for participation. Manufacturing data and trial status updates were also provided to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes for Patients with End Stage Heart Failure

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Planning I
Grant Number: 
DR2-05394
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$108 895
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Patients with end-stage heart failure (ESHF) have a 2-year survival rate of 50% with conventional medical therapy. This dismal survival rate is actually significantly worse than patients with AIDS, liver cirrhosis, stroke, and other debilitating diseases. Stem cell therapy may be a promising strategy for inducing myocardial regeneration via paracrine activation, prevention of cardiac apoptosis, and other mechanisms. Several studies have convincingly shown that human embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) and that these cells can be used to effectively improve cardiac function following myocardial infarction (MI). The objectives of this CIRM Disease Team Therapy proposal are two-fold: (1) to perform IND enabling studies involving hESC-CM for subsequent FDA approval and (2) to complete a Phase I trial with ESHF patients undergoing the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) procedure whereby hESC-CMs will be injected at the same time.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the number one cause of mortality and morbidity in the US. Following myocardial infarction (MI), the limited ability of the surviving cardiac cells to proliferate thereafter renders the damaged heart susceptible to dangerous consequences such as heart failure. In recent years, stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising candidate for treating ischemic heart disease. In contrast to adult stem cells, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the advantage of being pluripotent, which endows them with the ability to differentiate into virtually every cell type. Numerous studies have demonstrated that hESC-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) can improve cardiac function in small and large animal models. In addition, the FDA has approved hESC-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells for patients with acute spinal cord injury and hESC-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells for patients with Stargardt’s macular dystrophy. Hence the conventional controversies and regulatory hurdles related to hESC-based trials are no longer major barriers to the field. In this proposal, we seek to extend and translate the robust pre-clinical data into clinical reality by demonstrating the safety and feasibility of hESC-CM transplantation. We will perform careful IND-enabling research in the first 3 years. Afterwards, our medical teams will initiate a phase 1 clinical trial involving 10 patients with end stage heart failure (ESHF). We will perform direct intramyocardial injection of hESC-CMs in ESHF patients undergoing left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation as a bridge toward orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). After the patients have received matching donor hearts, the native recipient hearts will be explanted. This will provide us an opportunity to carefully assess the fate of these cells and to ensure safety before we can embark on a larger clinical trial in Years 5-10.
Progress Report: 
  • Patients with end-stage heart failure (ESHF) have a 2-year survival rate of 50% with conventional medical therapy. This dismal survival rate is actually significantly worse than patients with AIDS, liver cirrhosis, stroke, and other debilitating diseases. Stem cell therapy may be a promising strategy for inducing myocardial regeneration via paracrine activation, prevention of cardiac apoptosis, and other mechanisms. Several studies have convincingly shown that human embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) and that these cells can be used to effectively improve cardiac function following myocardial infarction (MI). Over the past year, we have assembled a strong multi-disciplinary team and applied for the CIRM Disease Team Therapy proposal.

Preclinical Development and First-In-Human Testing of [REDACTED] in Advanced Heart Failure

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Planning I
Grant Number: 
DR2-05434
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$106 239
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
This application seeks to bring to the clinic a new treatment for myocardial disease based on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived cardiomyocytes. hESC-cardiomyocytes have the unique potential to address the underlying cause of heart disease by repopulating areas of damaged myocardium (heart tissue) with viable cardiac cells. This therapeutic approach represents a potential breakthrough in heart disease treatment, serving one of the most intractable, largest, and most costly unmet clinical needs in the U.S. Currently available heart disease treatments have demonstrated ability to slow progression of the disease, but to date none can restore the key underlying defect in heart failure, a loss of contractile function. Cell therapy approaches have generated excitement for their unique potential to play a curative role in myocardial disease through the restoration of lost contractile and/or circulatory function. hESC-cardiomyocytes are unique amongst the cell therapy approaches in that they are a human cardiomyocyte (heart muscle cell) product; replacing damaged myocardium with viable heart cells which can integrate and form fully functional cardiac tissue. This approach has the potential to significantly halt or reverse cardiac functional decline. These benefits can significantly impact patient medication requirements and hospitalizations associated with ongoing cardiac decline, key drivers of the enormous health care costs associated with heart failure. The proposed scope of this project includes activities leading up to and including a regulatory filing with the FDA to initiate clinical testing of hESC-cardiomyocytes for the treatment of heart failure, as well as the enrollment and initial follow-up of a small cohort of patients in a first-in-human trial. The proposed product has completed extensive process development, product characterization, and preclinical (animal model studies) proof-of-concept studies to date. The scope of the proposed research includes: (i) performance of key preclinical safety and efficacy studies to enable entry to clinical testing (ii) manufacture of material for use in preclinical studies, development work, and clinical testing (iii) development and qualification of assays for product characterization, and (iv) preparation for and execution of initial clinical studies.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The proposed project has the potential to benefit the state of California through 1) providing improved medical outcomes for patients with heart disease, 2) increasing California’s leadership in the emerging field of stem cell research, and 3) preserving and creating high quality, high paying jobs for Californians. Heart disease is one of the most intractable, wide-spread, and fatal diseases in the U.S. More than 5.8 million Americans currently suffer from heart failure; close to 60% of heart failure patients die within 5 years of diagnosis. Although specific statistics are not available for California, they are likely similar to those nationwide, with incidence of more than 10 in 1000 individuals >65 years of age (AHA, 2010). Currently available heart disease therapies have demonstrated the ability to slow disease progression, but to date none can restore the key underlying defect leading to heart failure, a loss of cardiac contractile function. Cell therapy, an approach to regenerate or repair the damaged heart with new cells, addresses this fundamental need, and is considered one of the most important and promising frontiers for the treatment of heart disease. Although multiple other cell therapy products are currently being evaluated for the treatment of heart disease, human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes have unique potential to address the underlying defect of loss of contractile activity in heart failure, by replacing scarred or damaged heart tissue with new, functional human heart cells to restore cardiac function. California has a history of leadership in biotechnology, and is emerging as a leader in the development of stem cell therapeutics. Cutting edge stem cell research, in many cases funded by CIRM, is already underway in academic research laboratories and biotechnology companies throughout the state. The proposed project has the potential to further increase California’s leadership in the field of stem cell therapeutics through the performance of the first clinical testing of an hESC-derived cardiac cell therapy. The applicant has been located in California since its inception, and currently employs nearly 200 full-time employees at its California headquarters with more than 50% of employees holding an advanced degree. These positions are highly skilled positions, offering competitive salaries and comprehensive benefits. The successful performance of the proposed project would enable significant additional jobs creation as the program progresses through more advanced clinical testing.

Phase I study of IM Injection of VEGF Producing MSC for the Treatment of Critical Limb Ischemia

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Planning I
Grant Number: 
DR2-05423
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$76 861
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Critical limb ischemia (CLI) represents a significant unmet medical need without any approved medical therapies for patients who fail surgical or angioplasty procedures to restore blood flow to the lower leg. CLI affects 2 million people in the U.S. and is associated with an increased risk of leg amputation and death. Amputation rates in patients not suitable for surgery or angioplasty are reported to be up to 30-50% after 1 year. Patients who are not eligible for revascularization procedures are managed with palliative care, but would be candidates for the proposed phase I clinical trial. In an effort to combat CLI, prior and ongoing clinical trials that our group and others have conducted have evaluated direct injection of purified growth factors into the limb that has low blood flow. Some trials have tested plasmids that would produce the blood vessel growth factors for a short period of time. These therapies did show benefit in early stage clinical trials but were not significantly better than controls in Phase III (late stage) trials, probably due to the short duration of presence of the growth factors and their inability to spread to the areas most needed. Other clinical trials ongoing in our vascular center and others are testing the patient’s own stem cells, moved from the bone marrow to the damaged limb, and those studies are showing some benefit, although the final assessments are not yet completed. Stem cells can have benefit in limb ischemia because they can actively seek out areas of low oxygen and will produce some growth factors to try to encourage blood vessel growth. But in cases where the circulation needs very high levels of rescue, this strategy might not be enough. As an improved strategy we are combining the stem cell and growth factor approaches to make a more potent therapy. We have engineered human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) to produce high levels of the strong angiogenic agent VEGF for this novel approach (MSC/VEGF). We and others have documented over the past 20+ years that MSC are capable of sustained expression of growth factors, migrate into the areas of lowest oxygen in the tissues after injection, and wrap around the damaged or tiny blood vessels to secrete their factors where they are needed most. These MSC/VEGF cells are highly potent, safe and effective in our preclinical studies. These human stem cells designed to produce VEGF as “paramedic delivery vehicles armed with growth factor to administer” rapidly restored blood flow to the limbs of rodents who had zero circulation in one leg. With funding that could be potentially obtained through the proposed application we will follow the detailed steps to move this candidate therapy into clinical trials, and will initiate and complete an early phase clinical trial to test safety and potential efficacy of this product that is designed to save limbs from amputation.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) represents a significant unmet medical need without any curative therapies in its end stages, after even the best revascularization attempts using sophisticated catheters, stents, and bypass surgeries have failed. CLI affects over 2 million people in the US and the prevalence is increasing due to the aging of our population and the diabetes epidemic. In 2007, the treatment of diabetes and its complications in the USA generated $116 billion in direct costs; at least 33% of these costs were linked to the treatment of ischemic foot ulcers, associated with CLI. Once a patient develops CLI in a limb, the risk of needing amputation of the other limb is 50% after 6 years, with devastating consequences. Treatment costs are immense and lives are significantly shortened by this morbid disease. The symptoms associated with this very severe form of lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) are pain in the foot at rest, non- healing ulcers, limb/digital gangrene and delayed wound healing. The quality of life for those with CLI is extremely poor and reported to be similar to that of patients with end stage malignancy. Most patients with CLI will undergo repeat hospitalizations and surgical/endovascular procedures in an effort to preserve the limb, progress to immobility and need constant care. Unfortunately, the limb salvage efforts are often not effective enough, and despite multiple attempts at revascularization, the wounds still fail to heal. The final stage in 25% of cases is limb amputation, which is associated with a high mortality rate within 6 months. Amputation rates in patients not suitable for revascularization are reported to be up to 30-50% after 1 year. Fewer than half of all CLI patients achieve full mobility after an amputation and only one in four above-the-knee amputees will ever wear a prosthesis. Between 199– 1999, over 28,000 first time lower extremity bypass procedures were performed in California for CLI, and 29% of patients were admitted to the hospital for at least one subsequent bypass operation or revision procedure. The 5-year amputation free survival rate for this group of CLI patients from California was only 51.1%. The direct costs to California for the treatment of CLI and diabetic ischemic ulcers are substantial. The lost ability of no-option CLI patients to remain in the CA workforce, to support their families, and to pay taxes causes additional financial strain on the state’s economy. The goal of the proposed study is to develop and apply a safe and effective stem cell therapy to save limbs from amputation due to disorders of the vasculature that currently cannot be cured. The successful implementation of our planned therapies will significantly reduce the cost of healthcare in California and could bring people currently unable to work due to immobility back to the workforce and active lifestyles, with a significantly improved quality of life.
Progress Report: 
  • A) Pre-clinical: The remainder of the IND-enabling studies for the development candidate MSC/VEGF were designed in consultation with Biologics Consulting Group (BCG). The project will begin with the IND-enabling phase and transition through regulatory approvals and through the Phase I clinical trial. The project has a Preclinical unit under the leadership of co-PI Dr. Jan Nolta, and a Clinical unit under the leadership of PI Dr. John Laird. The two units are well integrated, since the team has been meeting frequently since 2008 to plan the testing of the current and prior development candidates. The team is currently performing a Phase I stem cell therapy to test a medical device, as the result of those interactions. During the planning phase we met weekly, and worked continually on the MSC/VEGF project.
  • Co-PI Jan Nolta, Ph.D. is Scientific Director of the UC Davis/CIRM GMP Facility. Dr. Nolta’s team is expert in translational applications of gene-modified MSC at the level of GLP. The Pre-Clinical team is performing all IND-enabling studies for MSC/VEGF, and will manufacture and qualify the MSC and MSC/VEGF products in the GMP facility at UC Davis that is directed by Dr. Bauer (CMC lead). These studies are ongoing and we have been advised by BCG consulting lead Andra Miller, who was formerly Gene Therapy Group Leader at the FDA, CBER, Division of Cell and Gene Therapies. BCG is assisting with preIND preparation, through the planning grant period funding for this project.
  • B) Clinical: The Clinical team is led by PI John Laird MD, Medical Director of the UCD Vascular Center, who is an internationally recognized leader in the field of peripheral vascular interventions. He is the PI for multicenter and multinational trials to evaluate novel treatments for peripheral arterial disease. He has led clinical trials investigating the use of FGF-1, Hif, and VEGF to treat claudication and CLI. Christy Pifer is the experienced Project Manager who will guide the entire process. She is the Vascular Center’s clinical trials manager and orchestrates accrual of patients to all trials, including one ongoing Phase I stem cell clinical trial and another pending, as well as a Phase III gene transfer clinical trial. Ms. Pifer has coordinated over 100 Phase I, II and III clinical trials over the past 12 years. The planning grant allowed Ms. Pifer to contribute significant amounts of time to conducting meetings and designing the clinical study with Dr. Laird and other Vascular Center faculty. We had weekly meetings with the clinical and translational team members to finalize the CIRM Disease Team Grant Application.
  • C) Consultant meetings conducted through the Planning Grant Mechanism:
  • - Paragon was chosen as our CRO for the proposed trial. We had on-site meetings and conference calls with Paragon during the planning phase.
  • - Our consultant Dr. Andy Balber, was a Founder, and for ten years served as the CSO of Aldagen, Inc. At Aldagen since 2000, he helped the Company establish and maintain a clinical program during which patients were treated with stem cell products under seven cleared INDs. Dr. Balber has assisted our team with preparation of the preIND application, and will assist with further dialog with the FDA. We met frequently through conference call and email, and he edited our Disease Teams Grant proposal.
  • - Andra Miller, Director, Cell and Gene Therapy, Biologics Consulting Group, Inc, is a consultant for the development of regulatory strategies to facilitate rapid development of our cell and gene based therap. She and her team are providing support for CMC submission, pre-IND, RAC and IND preparation, Phase I product development strategies and assessment of cGLP compliance. Dr. Miller was Gene Therapy Group Leader for the Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Office of Therapeutics of FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, for ten years. We met through conference call and email during the Planning Grant period and she edited our Disease Teams grant application.
  • Partner PI group: Dr. Herrera from the Reina Sofia Hospital, Cordoba University, Andalucia, is our partner, identified through the planning grant phase. Her team is currently performing clinical trials of MSC injections for CLI using intra-arterial administration. Now, using the strong development candidate MSC/VEGF, the two teams will each embark upon parallel clinical trials in their respective countries, each capitalizing on their own team’s stem cell delivery strengths to patients at the same stage of no option CLI. The two teams will use similar inclusion and exclusion criteria and will work closely together, if funded, to develop Phase I trials that are highly similar except for the route of injection. We had Skype and conference call meetings with interpreters, and frequent email contact during the Planning Grant phase. This partnership would not have been possible without the CIRM Planning Award.

Characterization and Engineering of the Cardiac Stem Cell Niche

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology III
Grant Number: 
RB3-05086
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 181 306
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Collaborative Funder: 
Germany
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Despite therapeutic advances, cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in both California and Europe. New insights into disease pathology, models to expedite in vitro testing and regenerative therapies would have an enormous societal and financial impact. Although very promising, practical application of pluripotent stem cells or their derivatives face a number of challenges and technological hurdles. For instance, recent reports have demonstrated that cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), which are capable of differentiating into all three cardiovascular cell types, are present during normal fetal development and can be isolated from pluripotent stem cells. induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived CPC therapy after a myocardial infarction would balance the need for an autologous, multipotent stem cell myocardial regeneration with the concerns of tumorigenicity using a more primitive stem cell. However, translating this discovery into a clinically useful therapy will require additional advances in our understanding of CPC biology and the factors that regulate their fate to develop optimized cell culture technology for CPC application in regenerative medicine. Cardiac cell therapy with hiPSC-derived cells, will require reproducible production of large numbers of well-characterized cells under defined conditions in vitro. This is particularly true for the rare and difficult to culture intermediates, such as CPCs. Our preliminary data demonstrated that a CPC niche exists during cardiac development and that CPC expansion is regulated by factors found within the niche microenvironment including specific soluble factors and ECM signals. However, our current understanding of the cardiac niche and how this unique microenvironment influences CPC fate is quite limited. We believe that if large scale production of hiPSC-derived CPCs is ever to be successful, new 3D cell culture technologies to replicate the endogenous cardiac niche will be required. The goals of this proposal are to address current deficiencies in our understanding of the cardiac niche and its effects on CPC expansion and differentiation as well as utilize novel bioengineering approaches to fabricate synthetic niche environments in vitro. The development of advanced fully automated in vitro culture systems that reproduce key features of natural niche microenvironments and control proliferation and/or differentiation, are critically needed both for studying the role of the niche in CPC biology but also the advancement of the field of regenerative medicine.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases are the #1 killer in California. Despite medical advances, heart disease remains a leading cause of disability and death. Recent estimates of its cost to the U.S. healthcare system amounts to almost $300 billion dollars. Although current therapies slow the progression of heart disease, there are few, if any options, to reverse or repair damage. Thus, regenerative therapies that restore normal heart function would have an enormous societal and financial impact not only on Californians, but the U.S. more generally. The research that is proposed in this application could lead to new therapies that would restore heart function after and heart attack and prevent the development of heart failure and death. We will develop the techniques to expand and transplant human cardiac progenitor cells. Combining tissue engineering with human pluripotent stem cells will facilitate the creation of new cardiovascular therapies.
Progress Report: 
  • Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. As humans lack the ability to regenerate myocardial tissue lost afte a heart attcak, there has been great focus on cardiovascualr regenerative therapies with the use of human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). There has been increased attention towards developing tissue engineering as a method to standardize methods to differentiate human ESCs and iPSCs into cardiovascular progenitor cells (CPC) expand these progenitor cells in a standardized manor. We have focused on developing techniques to allow expansion of these CPCs into clinically relevany numbers by determining: 1. Conditions to optimize their derivation into clinically numbers using clinical grade techniques.
  • 2. Defininy and optimizing the extracellular matrxi to be used to maintain these CPCs in an undifferentiated state to allow their expansion to clinically required numbers. We studied the endogenous environment that these CPCs exist in fetal development and focused on the extracellular matrix proteins that help support these CPCs during development. By studying the array of proteins endogenously in developing heart we now will shift our focus on re-engineering this environment in-vitro to be able to mimic this growth to use this as a mean to grow and expand these progenitors for use clinically in the future. Currently we are deriving these CPCs from human ESC and iPSC and expanding them on different combinations of proteins as determined in the staining of the endogenous fetal environment. We hope to by the end of this porject determine the ideal conditions for derivation of these CPCs from iPSCs and the environmental cues needed for culturing these cells to allow for maximal yield for potential use in clinical regenerative therapies in the future.
  • Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. As humans lack the ability to regenerate myocardial tissue lost afte a heart attcak, there has been great focus on cardiovascualr regenerative therapies with the use of human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). There has been increased attention towards developing tissue engineering as a method to standardize methods to differentiate human ESCs and iPSCs into cardiovascular progenitor cells (CPC) expand these progenitor cells in a standardized manor. We have focused on developing techniques to allow expansion of these CPCs into clinically relevany numbers by determining: 1. Conditions to optimize their derivation into clinically numbers using clinical grade techniques.
  • 2. Defininy and optimizing the extracellular matrxi to be used to maintain these CPCs in an undifferentiated state to allow their expansion to clinically required numbers. We studied the endogenous environment that these CPCs exist in fetal development and focused on the extracellular matrix proteins that help support these CPCs during development. By studying the array of proteins endogenously in developing heart we now will shift our focus on re-engineering this environment in-vitro to be able to mimic this growth to use this as a mean to grow and expand these progenitors for use clinically in the future. Currently we are deriving these CPCs from human ESC and iPSC and expanding them on different combinations of proteins as determined in the staining of the endogenous fetal environment. We hope to by the end of this porject determine the ideal conditions for derivation of these CPCs from iPSCs and the environmental cues needed for culturing these cells to allow for maximal yield for potential use in clinical regenerative therapies in the future.

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