Heart Disease

Coding Dimension ID: 
295
Coding Dimension path name: 
Heart Disease
Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-05901
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 708 560
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Each cell type in our body has its own identity. This identity allows a heart cell to contract repetitively, and a brain cell to conduct nerve impulses. Each cell type gains its identity by turning on or off thousands of genes that together give the cell its identity. Understanding how these sets of genes are regulated together as a cell gains its identity is important to be able to generate new cells in disease. For example, after a heart attack, heart muscle dies, leaving scar tissue and a poorly functioning heart. It would be very useful to be able to make new heart muscle by introducing the right set of instructions into other cells in the heart, and turn them into new heart muscle cells. One way that many genes are turned on or off together is by a cellular mechanism called epigenetic regulation. This global regulation coordinates thousands of genes. We plan to understand the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that give a human heart muscle cell its identity. Understanding their epigenetic blueprint of cardiac muscle cells will help develop strategies for cardiac regeneration, and for a deeper understanding of how cells in our body acquire their individual identities and function.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This research will benefit the state of California and its citizens by helping develop new approaches to cardiac regeneration that will be more efficient than current approaches, and amenable to drug-based approaches. In addition, the knowledge acquired in these studies will be important not only for heart disease, but for any other disease where reprogramming to regenerate new cells is desirable. The mechanisms revealed by this research will also lead to new understanding of the basis for congenital heart defects, which affect several thousand Californian children every year, and for which we understand very little.
Progress Report: 
  • We have made considerable progress on this project, which is aimed at understanding how genes are controlled during the conversion of human stem cells into heart cells. We have been able to use advanced techniques that allow us to make millions of human heart cells in a dish from "Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells" (known as iPS cells), which are cells derived from skin cells that have properties of embryonic stem cells. We are now using genome engineering techniques to insert a mutation that is associated with human congenital heart defects. We are now starting to map the chromatin marks that will tell us how heart genes are turned on, while genes belonging to other cell types are kept off. This "blueprint" of a heart cell will help us understand how to make better heart cells to repair injured hearts, and will allow us to model human congenital heart disease in a human experimental system.
  • We have made considerable progress on this project, which is aimed at understanding how genes are controlled during the conversion of human stem cells into heart cells. We have been able to use advanced techniques that allow us to make millions of human heart cells in a dish from "Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells" (known as iPS cells), which are cells derived from skin cells that have properties of embryonic stem cells. We are now using genome engineering techniques to insert a mutation that is associated with human congenital heart defects. We are now starting to map the chromatin marks that will tell us how heart genes are turned on, while genes belonging to other cell types are kept off. This "blueprint" of a heart cell will help us understand how to make better heart cells to repair injured hearts, and will allow us to model human congenital heart disease in a human experimental system.
Funding Type: 
Basic Biology III
Grant Number: 
RB3-05129
Investigator: 
Name: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 425 600
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people, including trained athletes, and is the most common inherited heart defect. Until now, studies in humans with HCM have been limited by a variety of factors, including variable environmental stimuli which may differ between individuals (e.g., diet, exercise, and lifestyle), the relative difficulty in obtaining human cardiac samples, and inadequate methods of maintaining human heart tissue in cell culture systems. Cellular reprogramming methods that enable derivation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from adult cells, which can then be differentiated into cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), are a revolutionary tool for creating disease-specific cell lines that may lead to effective targeted therapies. In this proposal, we will derive hiPSC-CMs from patients with HCM and healthy controls, then perform a battery of functional and molecular tests to determine the presence of cardiomyopathic disease and associated abnormal molecular programs. With these preliminary studies, we believe hiPSC-CMs with HCM phenotype will dramatically enhance the ability to perform future high-throughput drug screens, evaluate gene and cell therapies, and assess novel electrophysiologic interventions for potential new therapies of HCM. Because HCM is not a rare disease but rather the leading cause of inherited heart defects, we believe the findings here should have broad clinical and scientific impact toward understanding the molecular and cellular basis of HCM.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people and is the most common inherited heart defect. In this study, we will generate hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes from patients with HCM, then perform a number of functional, molecular, bioinformatic, and imaging analyses to determine the extent and nature of cardiomyopathic disease. We believe hiPSC-CMs with HCM phenotype will dramatically enhance the ability to perform future high-throughput drug screens, evaluate gene and cell therapies, and assess electrophysiologic interventions for potential novel therapies of HCM. The experiments outlined are pertinent and central to the overall mission of CIRM, which seeks to explore the use of stem cell platforms to yield novel mechanistic insights into the molecular and cellular basis of disease. Because HCM is not an orphan disease, but rather the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people, we believe the research findings will benefit the state of California and its citizens.
Progress Report: 
  • Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people, including trained athletes, and is the most common inherited heart defect. In this proposal, we will generate human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) from patients with HCM. The specific aims are as follow:
  • Specific Aim 1: Generate iPSCs from patients with HCM and healthy controls.
  • Specific Aim 2: Determine the extent of disease by performing molecular and functional analyses of hiPSC-CMs.
  • Specific Aim 3: Rescue the molecular and functional phenotypes using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology.
  • Over the past year, we have now derived iPSCs from a 10-patient family cohort with the MYH7 mutation. Established iPSC lines from all subjects were differentiated into cardiomyocyte lineages (iPSC-CMs) using standard 3D EB differentiation protocols. We found hypertrophic iPSC-CMs exhibited features of HCM such as cellular enlargement and multi-nucleation beginning in the sixth week following induction of cardiac differentiation. We also found hypertrophic iPSC-CMs demonstrated other hallmarks of HCM including expression of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), elevation of β-myosin/α-myosin ratio, calcineurin activation, and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) as detected by immunostaining. Blockade of calcineurin-NFAT interaction in HCM iPSC-CMs by cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506 reduced hypertrophy by over 40%. In the absence of inhibition, NFAT-activated mediators of hypertrophy such as GATA4 and MEF2C were found to be significantly upregulated in HCM iPSC-CMs beginning day 40 post-induction of cardiac differentiation, but not prior to this point. Taken together, these results indicate that calcineurin-NFAT signaling plays a central role in the development of the HCM phenotype as caused by the Arg663His mutation.
  • Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people, including trained athletes, and is the most common
  • inherited heart defect. In this proposal, we will generate and characterize human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) from patients with HCM. The
  • specific aims are as follow:
  • Specific Aim 1: Generate iPSCs from patients with HCM and healthy controls.
  • Specific Aim 2: Determine the extent of disease by performing molecular and functional analyses of hiPSC-CMs.
  • Specific Aim 3: Rescue the molecular and functional phenotypes using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology.
  • Over the past year, we have characterized the pathological phenotypes from iPSCs derived from a 10-patient family cohort with the MYH7 mutation.
  • We've differentiated all stablished iPSC lines from all subjects into cardiomyocyte using a modified protocol from that published by Palacek in PNAS 2011. This protocol increased the yield of cardiomyocytes significantly to consistently greater than 70% beating cardiomyocytes. We then tested the electrophysiological properties of iPSC-CMs from control and patients with HCM and found that both control and patient iPSC-CM display atrial, ventricular and nodal-like electrical waveforms by whole cell patch clamping. However, by day 30, a large subfraction (~40%) of the HCM iPSC-CM exhibit arrhythmic waveforms including delayed after-depolarizations (DADs) compared with control (~5.1%). In addition we found that treatment of HCM hiPSC-CM with positive inotropic agents (beta-adrenergic agonist - isoproterenal) for 5 days caused an earlier increase in cell size by 1.7 fold as compared to controls and significant increase in irregular calcium transients. Furthermore, we found that HCM iPSC-CMs exhibited frequent arrhythmia due to their increased intracellular calcium level by 30% at baseline. These HCM iPSC-CM also exhibited decreased calcium release by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. These findings emphasize the role of irregular calcium recycling in the pathogenesis of HCM. To confirm that the regulation of myocyte calcium is the key to HCM pathogenesis, we treated several lines from multiple HCM patients with calcium channel blocker (verapamil/diltiazem) and found that this treatment significantly ameliorated all aspects of the HCM phenotype including myocyte hypertrophy, calcium handling abnormalities, and arrhythmia. These finding supports the use of calcium channel blockers in patients with HCM and encourages further clinical studies in HCM patients using these agents.
  • Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people, including trained athletes, and is the most common
  • inherited heart defect. In this proposal, we will generate human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) from patients with HCM. The
  • specific aims are as follow:
  • Specific Aim 1: Generate iPSCs from patients with HCM and healthy controls.
  • Specific Aim 2: Determine the extent of disease by performing molecular and functional analyses of hiPSC-CMs.
  • Specific Aim 3: Rescue the molecular and functional phenotypes using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology.
  • Over the past year, we have characterized iPSC-CMs from a 10-patient family cohort with the MYH7 mutation using standard 3D EB differentiation protocols.
  • We found normal and hypertrophic iPSC-CMs were predictive as in vitro model for arrhythmia screening using microelectroarrays and single cell patch-clamping
  • analysis. For example, we found that administration of catecholamine drug norepinephrine causes the formation of torsade de point which is a lethan arrhythmia.
  • This recapitulates the phenotype in patients with HCM receiving catecholamine drugs. We also found increase in torsade formation when the iPSC-CMs are treated
  • with hERG blockers that are also known to cause increases in arrhythmia in HCM patients. We believe the use of hiPSC-CM from healthy individuals and patients with
  • genetic heart disease can help predict the potential arrhythmic risk in existing or new drug agents that are undergoing FDA evaluation.
  • We have also generated HCM mutations in lines of normal iPSC to determine whether these mutant lines will exhibit HCM phenotype. This would satisfy the Koch's postulate
  • with regards to the role of the mutant DNA sequence on HCM manifestation. We found, using TALEN and piggyBac transposon technologies that genome edited can be generated
  • to carry R663H mutation in the MYH7 gene and that these genome edited iPSC-CM recapitulated the HCM phenotype associated with the R663H mutation such as sarcomere
  • disassembly and intracellular calcium abnormalities as well as contractile arrhythmias. We have also corrected mutant HCM human iPSC from patients with MYH7 R663H mutation
  • and show that these corrected iPSC-CM exhibit normal sarcomeric phenotype with smaller cell size and reduced calcium transient irregularities.
Funding Type: 
Early Translational I
Grant Number: 
TR1-01249
Investigator: 
Name: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$6 762 954
Disease Focus: 
Bone or Cartilage Disease
Stroke
Neurological Disorders
Heart Disease
Neurological Disorders
Skin Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
All adult tissues contain stem cells. Some tissues, like bone marrow and skin, harbor more adult stem cells; other tissues, like muscle, have fewer. When a tissue or organ is injured these stem cells possess a remarkable ability to divide and multiply. In the end, the ability of a tissue to repair itself seems to depend on how many stem cells reside in a particular tissue, and the state of those stem cells. For example, stress, disease, and aging all diminish the capacity of adult stem cells to self-renew and to proliferate, which in turn hinders tissue regeneration. Our strategy is to commandeer the molecular machinery responsible for adult stem cell self-renewal and proliferation and by doing so, stimulate the endogenous program of tissue regeneration. This approach takes advantage of the solution that Nature itself developed for repairing damaged or diseased tissues, and controls adult stem cell proliferation in a localized, highly controlled fashion. This strategy circumvents the immunological, medical, and ethical hurdles that exist when exogenous stem cells are introduced into a human. When utilizing this strategy the goal of reaching clinical trials in human patients within 5 years becomes realistic. Specifically, we will target the growing problem of neurologic, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and wound healing diseases by local delivery of a protein that promotes the body’s inherent ability to repair and regenerate tissues. We have evidence that this class of proteins, when delivered locally to an injury site, is able to stimulate adult tissue stem cells to grow and repair/replace the deficient tissue following injury. We have developed technologies to package the protein in a specialized manner that preserves its biological activity but simultaneously restricts its diffusion to unintended regions of the body. For example, when we treat a skeletal injury with this packaged protein we augment the natural ability to heal bone by 350%; and when this protein is delivered to the heart immediately after an infarction cardiac output is improved and complications related to scarring are reduced. This remarkable capacity to augment tissue healing is not limited to bones and the heart: the same powerful effect can be elicited in the brain, and skin injuries. The disease targets of stroke, bone fractures, heart attacks, and skin wounds and ulcers represent an enormous health care burden now, but this burden is expected to skyrocket because our population is quickly aging. Thus, our proposal addresses a present and ongoing challenge to healthcare for the majority of Californians, with a novel therapeutic strategy that mimics the body’s inherent repair mechanisms.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Californians represent 1 in 7 Americans, and make up the single largest healthcare market in the United States. The diseases and injuries that affect Californians affect the rest of the US, and the world. For example, stroke is the third leading cause of death, with more than 700,000 people affected every year. It is a leading cause of serious long-term disability, with an estimated 5.4 million stroke survivors currently alive today. Symptoms of musculoskeletal disease are the number two most cited reasons for visit to a physician. Musculoskeletal disease is the leading cause of work-related and physical disability in the United States, with arthritis being the leading chronic condition reported by the elderly. In adults over the age of 70, 40% suffer from osteoarthritis of the knee and of these nearly 80% have limitation of movement. By 2030, nearly 67 million US adults will be diagnosed with arthritis. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death, and is a major cause of disability worldwide. The annual socioeconomic burden posed by cardiovascular disease is estimated to exceed $400 billion annually and remains a major cause of health disparities and rising health care costs. Skin wounds from burns, trauma, or surgery, and chronic wounds associated with diabetes or pressure ulcer, exact a staggering toll on our healthcare system: Burns alone affect 1.25M Americans each year, and the economic global burden of these injuries approaches $50B/yr. In California alone, the annual healthcare expenditures for stroke, skeletal repair, heart attacks, and skin wound healing are staggering and exceed 700,000 cases, 3.5M hospital days, and $34B. We have developed a novel, protein-based therapeutic platform to accelerate and enhance tissue regeneration through activation of adult stem cells. This technology takes advantage of a powerful stem cell factor that is essential for the development and repair of most of the body’s tissues. We have generated the first stable, biologically active recombinant Wnt pathway agonist, and showed that this protein has the ability to activate adult stem cells after tissue injury. Thus, our developmental candidate leverages the body’s natural response to injury. We have generated exciting preclinical results in a variety of animals models including stroke, skeletal repair, heart attack, and skin wounding. If successful, this early translational award would have enormous benefits for the citizens of California and beyond.
Progress Report: 
  • In the first year of CIRM funding our objectives were to optimize the activity of the Wnt protein for use in the body and then to test, in a variety of injury models, the effects of this lipid-packaged form of Wnt. We have made considerable progress on both of these fronts. For example, in Roel Nusse and Jill Helms’ groups, we have been able to generate large amounts of the mouse form of Wnt3a protein and package it into liposomal vesicles, which can then be used by all investigators in their studies of injury and repair. Also, Roel Nusse succeeded in generating human Wnt3a protein. This is a major accomplishment since our ultimate goal is to develop this regenerative medicine tool for use in humans. In Jill Helms’ lab we made steady progress in standardizing the activity of the liposomal Wnt3a formulation, and this is critically important for all subsequent studies that will compare the efficacy of this treatment across multiple injury repair scenarios.
  • Each group began testing the effects of liposomal Wnt3a treatment for their particular application. For example, in Theo Palmer’s group, the investigators tested how liposomal Wnt3a affected cells in the brain following a stroke. We previously found that Wnt3A promotes the growth of neural stem cells in a petri dish and we are now trying to determine if delivery of Wnt3A can enhance the activity of endogenous stem cells in the brain and improve the level of recovery following stroke. Research in the first year examined toxicity of a liposome formulation used to deliver Wnt3a and we found it to be well tolerated after injection into the brains of mice. We also find that liposomal Wnt3a can promote the production of new neurons following stroke. The ongoing research involves experiments to determine if these changes in stem cell activity are accompanied by improved neurological function. In Jill Helms’ group, the investigators tested how liposomal Wnt3a affected cells in a bone injury site. We made a significant discovery this year, by demonstrating that liposomal Wnt3a stimulates the proliferation of skeletal progenitor cells and accelerates their differentiation into osteoblasts (published in Science Translational Medicine 2010). We also started testing liposomal Wnt3a for safety and toxicity issues, both of which are important prerequisites for use of liposomal Wnt3a in humans. Following a heart attack (i.e., myocardial infarction) we found that endogenous Wnt signaling peaks between post-infarct day 5-7. We also found that small aggregates of cardiac cells called cardiospheres respond to Wnt in a dose-responsive manner. In skin wounds, we tested the effect of boosting Wnt signaling during skin wound healing. We found that the injection of Wnt liposomes into wounds enhanced the regeneration of hair follicles, which would otherwise not regenerate and make a scar instead. The speed and strength of wound closure are now being measured.
  • In aggregate, our work on this project continues to move forward with a number of great successes, and encouraging data to support our hypothesis that augmenting Wnt signaling following tissue injury will provide beneficial effects.
  • In the second year of CIRM funding our objectives were to optimize packaging of the developmental candidate, Wnt3a protein, and then to continue to test its efficacy to enhance tissue healing. We continue to make considerable progress on the stated objectives. In Roel Nusse’s laboratory, human Wnt3a protein is now being produced using an FDA-approved cell line, and Jill Helms’ lab the protein is effectively packaged into lipid particles that delay degradation of the protein when it is introduced into the body.
  • Each group has continued to test the effects of liposomal Wnt3a treatment for their particular application. In Theo Palmer’s group we have studied how liposomal Wnt3a affects neurogenesis following stroke. We now know that liposomal Wnt3a transiently stimulates neural progenitor cell proliferation. We don’t see any functional improvement after stroke, though, which is our primary objective.
  • In Jill Helms’ group we’ve now shown that liposomal Wnt3a enhances fracture healing and osseointegration of dental and orthopedic implants and now we demonstrate that liposomal Wnt3a also can improve the bone-forming capacity of bone marrow grafts, especially when they are taken from aged animals.
  • We’ve also tested the ability of liposomal Wnt3a to improve heart function after a heart attack (i.e., myocardial infarction). Small aggregates of cardiac progenitor cells called cardiospheres proliferate to Wnt3a in a dose-responsive manner, and we see an initial improvement in cardiac function after treatment of cells with liposomal Wnt3a. the long-term improvements, however, are not significant and this remains our ultimate goal. In skin wounds, we tested the effect of boosting Wnt signaling during wound healing. We found that the injection of liposomal Wnt3a into wounds enhanced the regeneration of hair follicles, which would otherwise not regenerate and make a scar instead. The speed of wound closure is also enhanced in regions of the skin where there are hair follicles.
  • In aggregate, our work continues to move forward with a number of critical successes, and encouraging data to support our hypothesis that augmenting Wnt signaling following tissue injury will provide beneficial effects.
  • Every adult tissue harbors stem cells. Some tissues, like bone marrow and skin, have more adult stem cells and other tissues, like muscle or brain, have fewer. When a tissue is injured, these stem cells divide and multiply but only to a limited extent. In the end, the ability of a tissue to repair itself seems to depend on how many stem cells reside in a particular tissue, and the state of those stem cells. For example, stress, disease, and aging all diminish the capacity of adult stem cells to respond to injury, which in turn hinders tissue healing. One of the great unmet challenges for regenerative medicine is to devise ways to increase the numbers of these “endogenous” stem cells, and revive their ability to self-renew and proliferate.
  • The scientific basis for our work rests upon our demonstration that a naturally occurring stem cell growth factor, Wnt3a, can be packaged and delivered in such a way that it is robustly stimulates stem cells within an injured tissue to divide and self-renew. This, in turn, leads to unprecedented tissue healing in a wide array of bone injuries especially in aged animals. As California’s population ages, the cost to treat such skeletal injuries in the elderly will skyrocket. Thus, our work addresses a present and ongoing challenge to healthcare for the majority of Californians and the world, and we do it by mimicking the body’s natural response to injury and repair.
  • To our knowledge, there is no existing technology that displays such effectiveness, or that holds such potential for the stem cell-based treatment of skeletal injuries, as does a L-Wnt3a strategy. Because this approach directly activates the body’s own stem cells, it avoids many of the pitfalls associated with the introduction of foreign stem cells or virally reprogrammed autologous stem cells into the human body. In summary, our data show that L-Wnt3a constitutes a viable therapeutic approach for the treatment of skeletal injuries, especially those in individuals with diminished healing potential.
  • This progress report covers the period between Sep 01 2012through Aug 31 2013, and summarizes the work accomplished under ET funding TR1-01249. Under this award we developed a Wnt protein-based platform for activating a patient’s own stem cells for the purpose of tissue regeneration.
  • At the beginning of our grant period we generated research grade human WNT3A protein in quantities sufficient for all our discovery experiments. We then tested the ability of this WNT protein therapeutic to improve the healing response in animal models of stroke, heart attack, skin wounding, and bone fracture. These experimental models recapitulated some of the most prevalent and debilitating human diseases that collectively, affect millions of Californians.
  • At the end of year 2, we assembled an external review panel to select the promising clinical indication. The scientific advisory board unanimously selected skeletal repair as the leading indication. The WNT protein is notoriously difficult to purify; consequently in year 3 we developed new methods to streamline the purification of WNT proteins, and the packaging of the WNT protein into liposomal vesicles that stabilized the protein for in vivo use.
  • In years 3 and 4 we continued to accrue strong scientific evidence in both large and small animal models that a WNT protein therapeutic accelerates bone regeneration in critical size bony non-unions, in fractures, and in cases of implant osseointegration. In this last year of funding, we clarified and characterized the mechanism of action of the WNT protein, by showing that it activates endogenous stem cells, which in turn leads to faster healing of a range of different skeletal defects.
  • In this last year we also identified a therapeutic dose range for the WNT protein, and developed a route and method of delivery that was simultaneously effective and yet limited the body’s exposure to this potent stem cell factor. We initiated preliminary safety studies to identify potential risks, and compared the effects of WNT treatment with other commercially available bone growth factors. In sum, we succeeded in moving our early translational candidate from exploratory studies to validation, and are now ready to enter into the IND-enabling phase of therapeutic candidate development.
  • This progress report covers the period between Sep 01 2013 through April 30 2014, and summarizes the work accomplished under ET funding TR101249. Under this award we developed a Wnt protein-based platform for activating a patient’s own stem cells for purposes of tissue regeneration.
  • At the beginning of our grant period we generated research grade human WNT3A protein in quantities sufficient for all our discovery experiments. We then tested the ability of this WNT protein therapeutic to improve the healing response in animal models of stroke, heart attack, skin wounding, and bone fracture. These experimental models recapitulated some of the most prevalent and debilitating human diseases that collectively, affect millions of Californians. At the conclusion of Year 2 an external review panel was assembled and charged with the selection of a single lead indication for further development. The scientific advisory board unanimously selected skeletal repair as the lead indication.
  • In year 3 we accrued addition scientific evidence, using both large and small animal models, demonstrating that a WNT protein therapeutic accelerated bone healing. Also, we developed new methods to streamline the purification of WNT proteins, and improved our method of packaging of the WNT protein into liposomal vesicles (e.g., L-WNT3A) for in vivo use.
  • In year 4 we clarified the mechanism of action of L-WNT3A, by demonstrating that it activates endogenous stem cells and therefore leads to accelerated bone healing. We also continued our development studies, by identifying a therapeutic dose range for L-WNT3A, as well as a route and method of delivery that is both effective and safe. We initiated preliminary safety studies to identify potential risks, and compared the effects of L-WNT3A with other, commercially available bone growth factors.
  • In year 5 we initiated two new preclinical studies aimed at demonstrating the disease-modifying activity of L-WNT3A in spinal fusion and osteonecrosis. These two new indications were chosen by a CIRM review panel because they represent an unmet need in California and the nation. We also initiated development of a scalable manufacturing and formulation process for both the WNT3A protein and L-WNT3A formulation. These two milestones were emphasized by the CIRM review panel to represent major challenges to commercialization of L-WNT3A; consequently, accomplishment of these milestones is a critical yardstick by which progress towards an IND filing can be assessed.
Funding Type: 
hiPSC Derivation
Grant Number: 
ID1-06557
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$16 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Developmental Disorders
Genetic Disorder
Heart Disease
Infectious Disease
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Autism
Respiratory Disorders
Vision Loss
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the potential to differentiate to nearly any cells of the body, thereby providing a new paradigm for studying normal and aberrant biological networks in nearly all stages of development. Donor-specific iPSCs and differentiated cells made from them can be used for basic and applied research, for developing better disease models, and for regenerative medicine involving novel cell therapies and tissue engineering platforms. When iPSCs are derived from a disease-carrying donor; the iPSC-derived differentiated cells may show the same disease phenotype as the donor, producing a very valuable cell type as a disease model. To facilitate wider access to large numbers of iPSCs in order to develop cures for polygenic diseases, we will use a an episomal reprogramming system to produce 3 well-characterized iPSC lines from each of 3,000 selected donors. These donors may express traits related to Alzheimer’s disease, autism spectrum disorders, autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cerebral palsy, diabetes, or respiratory diseases. The footprint-free iPSCs will be derived from donor peripheral blood or skin biopsies. iPSCs made by this method have been thoroughly tested, routinely grown at large scale, and differentiated to produce cardiomyocytes, neurons, hepatocytes, and endothelial cells. The 9,000 iPSC lines developed in this proposal will be made widely available to stem cell researchers studying these often intractable diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer great promise to the large number of Californians suffering from often intractable polygenic diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, autism spectrum disorders, autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and respiratory disease. iPSCs can be generated from numerous adult tissues, including blood or skin, in 4–5 weeks and then differentiated to almost any desired terminal cell type. When iPSCs are derived from a disease-carrying donor, the iPSC-derived differentiated cells may show the same disease phenotype as the donor. In these cases, the cells will be useful for understanding disease biology and for screening drug candidates, and California researchers will benefit from access to a large, genetically diverse iPSC bank. The goal of this project is to reprogram 3,000 tissue samples from patients who have been diagnosed with various complex diseases and from healthy controls. These tissue samples will be used to generate fully characterized, high-quality iPSC lines that will be banked and made readily available to researchers for basic and clinical research. These efforts will ultimately lead to better medicines and/or cellular therapies to treat afflicted Californians. As iPSC research progresses to commercial development and clinical applications, more and more California patients will benefit and a substantial number of new jobs will be created in the state.
Progress Report: 
  • First year progress on grant ID1-06557, " Generation and Characterization of High-Quality, Footprint-Free Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) Lines From 3000 Donors to Investigate Multigenic Disease" has met all agreed-upon milestones. In particular, Cellular Dynamics International (CDI) has taken lease to approximately 5000 square feet of lab space at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, CA. The majority of this space is located within the new CIRM-funded Stem Cell Research Building at the Buck Institute and was extensively reconfigured to meet the specific needs of this grant. All equipment, including tissue culture safety cabinets and incubators, liquid-handling robotics, and QC instrumentation have been installed and qualified. A total of 16 scientists have been hired and trained (13 in Production and 3 in Quality) and more than 20 Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) have been developed and approved specifically for this project. These SOPs serve to govern the daily activities of the Production and Quality staff and help ensure consistency and quality throughout the iPSC derivation and characterization process. In addition, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) had to be developed to handle the large amount of data generated by this project and to track all samples from start to finish. The first and most important phase of this LIMS project has been completed; additional functionalities will likely be added to the LIMS during the next year, but completion of phase 1 will allow us to enter full production mode on schedule in the first quarter of year 2. Procedures for the shipping, infectious disease testing, and processing of donor samples were successfully implemented with the seven Tissue Collectors. To date, over 700 samples have been received from these Tissue Collectors and derivation of the first 50 patient-derived iPSC lines has been completed on schedule. These cells have been banked in the Coriell BioRepository, also located at the Buck Institute. The first Distribution Banks will be available for commercial release during year 2.
Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies III
Grant Number: 
RT3-07838
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$899 728
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
As ongoing CIRM-funded development of regenerative medicine (RM) progresses, the demand for increasing numbers of pluripotent stem cells and their differentiated derivatives has also increased. We have established a scalable suspension culture system for the production of large quantities of hESC for banking and to seed production of a number of regenerative medicine cell types, notably retinal pigmented epithelia, neural stem cells, dopaminergic neurons and cardiomyocytes, that support a number of CIRM and NIH-funded groups. In addition, we have adapted this system for the suspension production of several hESC derivative cell types, notably cardiomyocytes. While our system has provided unprecedented production capability for a number of cell products in pre-clinical and imminent clinical studies, it has proven impractical to scale up to the level that will be required for clinical trials for some hESC cell products, notably cardiomyocytes, due to high expected human doses. This project will resolve this scale-up challenge by adapting our suspension cell culture system, that is limited to 1-3L spinner culture flasks, to a more readily scalable and controllable suspension bioreactor system that utilizes “bags” capable of volumes up to 500L. Achieving this objective will remove a key barrier to progressing RM for cardiac applications as well as open the door to large clinical trials and commercialization of other regenerative medicine cell products in the years to come.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
We have developed GMP-compliant suspension cell culture processes for scalable production of hPSC and derivatives. These processes have been invaluable in our support of CIRM- and NIH-funded regenerative medicine projects, including those with RPE, NSC, DA neurons and cardiomyocytes (CM), as well as for production of GMP banks of hPSC for various projects. Our GMP-compliant suspension culture CM production process has made pre-clinical animal studies and small early clinical trials practical. However, while our current CM system is readily transferred to other groups and is meeting current production requirements, the scale requirements for anticipated high dose clinical trials is beyond the practical limitation of our spinner flask-based system. hPSC and CM are sensitive to changes in shear encountered at every scale-up step and re-optimizing conditions at each step is prohibitively expensive. Our experience using bag-based bioreactors for non-hESC products suggests that scale-up in bags will be more controllable and predictable than spinners or stir-tanks reactors. It is also a readily transferred technology. We propose to adapt our suspension hPSC and CM processes to a bag system, optimize conditions at a small scale, then demonstrate scalability at a moderate scale. Success in this project will remove a key barrier to developing many regenerative medicine products, and in particular those where high human doses are anticipated, such as CM.
Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-07356
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 124 834
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Cells in the body take up nutrients from their environment and metabolize them in a complex set of biochemical reactions to generate energy and replicate. Control of these processes is particularly important for heart cells, which need large amounts of energy to drive blood flow throughout the body. Not surprisingly, the nutritional requirements of heart cells are very different than those of stem cells. This proposal will investigate the metabolism of pluripotent stem cells and how this changes during differentiation to cardiac cells. We will determine which nutrients are important to make functional heart cells and use this information to optimize growth conditions for producing heart cells for regenerative medicine and basic biology applications. We accomplish this by feeding cells nutrients (sugar, fat) labeled with isotopes. As these labeled molecules are consumed, the isotopes are incorporated into different metabolites which we track using mass spectrometry. This advanced technique will allow us to see how sugars and fat are metabolized inside stem cells and cardiac cells obtained through differentiation. We will also study the electrical activity of these heart cells to ensure that adequate nutrients are provided for the generation of cells with optimal function. Ultimately, this project will lead to new methods for producing functional heart cells for regenerative medicine and may also lead to insights into how cardiac cells malfunction in heart disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in California. As a result, much of the regenerative medicine community in the state and the many Californians suffering from heart failure are interested in obtaining functional heart cells from stem cells. Our work will identify the most important nutrients required to coax stem cell-derived heart cells to behave like true adult heart cells. This information will make more effective cell models for researchers and companies to study how this disease affects heart cell metabolism. Since enzymes are highly targetable with drugs, the basic scientific findings from our work will be of great interest to California biotechnology companies and can stimulate job growth in the state. Our findings will also provide insight into very specific types of genetic heart disease, and this work may lead to additional grants from federal funding sources, bringing about additional revenue and job growth in California. A better understanding of how different nutrients influence heart cell function may provide guidance into new treatment strategies for heart disease. Finally, this work will highlight the importance of diet, nutrition, and healthy heart function, providing useful information relating to public health.
Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-06215
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 367 604
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
In the process of a heart attack, clots form suddenly on top of cholesterol-laden plaques, blocking blood flow to heart muscle. As a result, living heart tissue dies and is replaced by scar. The larger the scar, the higher the chance of premature death and disability following the heart attack. While conventional treatments aim to limit the initial injury (by promptly opening the clogged artery) and to prevent further damage (using various drugs), regenerative therapy for heart attacks seeks to regrow healthy heart muscle and to dissolve scar. To date, cell therapy with CDCs is the only intervention which has been shown to be clinically effective in regenerating the injured human heart. However, the cellular origin of the newly-formed heart muscle and the mechanisms underlying its generation remain unknown. The present grant seeks to understand those basic mechanisms in detail, relying upon state-of-the-art scientific methods and preclinical disease models. Our work to date suggests that much of the benefit is due to an indirect effect of transplanted CDCs to stimulate the proliferation of surrounding host heart cells. This represents a major, previously-unrecognized mechanism of cardiac regeneration in response to cell therapy. The proposed project will open up novel mechanistic insights which will hopefully enable us to boost the efficacy of stem cell-based treatments by bolstering the regeneration of injured heart muscle.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Coronary artery disease is the predominant cause of premature death and disability in California. Clots form suddenly on top of cholesterol-laden plaques in the wall of a coronary artery, blocking blood flow to the heart muscle. This leads to a “heart attack”, in which living heart muscle dies and is replaced by scar. The larger the scar, the greater the chance of death and disability following the heart attack. While conventional treatments aim to limit the initial injury (by promptly opening the clogged artery) and to prevent further injury (using various drugs), regenerative therapy for heart attacks seeks to regrow healthy heart muscle and to dissolve scar. To date, cell therapy with CDCs is the only intervention that has been shown to be clinically effective in regenerating the injured human heart. However, the cellular origin of the newly-formed heart muscle and the mechanisms underlying its generation remain unknown. The present grant seeks to understand those basic mechanisms in detail, relying upon state-of-the-art scientific methods and preclinical disease models. The resulting insights will enable more rational development of novel therapeutic approaches, to the benefit of the public health of the citizens of California. Economic benefits may also accrue from licensing of new technology.
Progress Report: 
  • Key abbreviations:
  • CDCs: cardiosphere-derived cells
  • MI: myocardial infarction
  • The present award tests the hypothesis that CDCs promote regrowth of normal mammalian heart tissue through induction of adult cardiomyocyte cell cycle re-entry and proliferation (as occurs naturally in zebrafish and neonatal mice). Such a mechanism, if established, would challenge the dogma that terminally-differentiated adult cardiomyocytes cannot re-enter the cell cycle. We have employed an inducible cardiomyocyte-specific fate-mapping approach (to specifically mark resident myocytes and their progeny), coupled with novel methods of myocyte purification and rigorous quantification. We have also developed assays that enable us to exclude potential technical confounding factors. The use of bitransgenic mice is essential for our experimental design (as it enables fate mapping of resident myocytes in a mammalian model), while the use of mouse CDCs in our in vivo experiments (as opposed to human CDCs) enables us to avoid immunosuppression and its complications. To date, mouse, rat and pig models have proven to be reliable in predicting clinical effects of CDC therapy in humans, and results with human and mouse CDCs in comparable models (e.g., SCID mice for human CDCs versus wild-type mice for mouse CDCs) have not revealed any major mechanistic divergence. Our results demonstrate that induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation represents a major, previously-unrecognized mechanism of cardiac regeneration in response to cell therapy. One full-length publication describing these findings has appeared (K. Malliaras et al., EMBO Mol Med, 2013, 5:191-209), and another paper has been submitted. The work has already begun to open up novel mechanistic insights which will enable us to improve the efficacy of stem cell-based treatments and bolster cardiomyocyte repopulation of infarcted myocardium.
  • CDCs: cardiosphere-derived cells
  • MI: myocardial infarction
  • The present award tests the hypothesis that CDCs promote regrowth of normal mammalian heart tissue through induction of adult cardiomyocyte cell cycle re-entry and proliferation (as occurs naturally in zebrafish and neonatal mice). Such a mechanism, if established, would challenge the dogma that terminally-differentiated adult cardiomyocytes cannot reenter the cell cycle. We have employed an inducible cardiomyocyte-specific fate-mapping approach (to specifically mark resident myocytes and their progeny), coupled with novel methods of myocyte purification and rigorous quantification. We have also developed assays that enable us to exclude potential technical confounding factors. The use of bitransgenic mice is essential for our experimental design (as it enables fate mapping of resident myocytes in a mammalian model), while the use of mouse CDCs in our in vivo experiments (as opposed to human CDCs) enables us to avoid immunosuppression and its complications. To date, mouse, rat, and pig models have proven to be reliable in predicting clinical effects of CDC therapy in humans, and results with human and mouse CDCs in comparable models (e.g., SCID mice for human CDCs versus wild-type mice for mouse CDCs) have not revealed any major mechanistic divergence. Our results demonstrate that induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation represents a major, previously-unrecognized mechanism of cardiac regeneration in response to cell therapy. Two full-length publications describing these findings has appeared (Malliaras, K, et al., EMBO Mol Med. 2014, 6:760-777; Malliaras K, et al., EMBO Mol Med, 2013, 5:191-209). The work has already begun to open up novel mechanistic insights which will enable us to improve the efficacy of stem cell-based treatments and bolster cardiomyocyte repopulation of infarcted myocardium.
Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-05764
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 334 880
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Currently, over 350,000 patients per year with abnormal heart rhythm receive electronic pacemakers to restore their normal heart beat. Electronic pacemakers do not respond to the need for changing heart rate in situations such as exercise and have limited battery life, which can be resolved with biopacemakers. In this proposed project, we will examine methods that improve the generation of pacemaking cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells as candidates for biopacemaker.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This proposal aims to generate pacemaking cells through facilitated differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells that may serve as biopacemakers. Over 350,000 patients a year in the U.S. require the implantation of an electronic pacemaker to restore their heart rhythm, with more than 3 million patients that are dependent on this device. At the cost of $58K per pacemaker implantation, the healthcare burden is greater than $20 billion a year. However, the cost associated with these electronic devices does not end with surgery for implantation. These devices require a battery change every 5 to 10 years that involve another surgical procedure. With California being the most populated state, this can be very costly to the Californians. It also does not give the patients the quality of life by having to endure repeated surgeries. The possibility of biopacemaker that requires no future battery replacements and other advantages such as physiological adaptation to the active state of the patient make biopacemakers a truly desirable alternative to electronic devices. Moreover, one in 20,000 infants or preemies with congenital sinoatrial node dysfunction are also inappropriate candidates to receive electronic pacemakers because they are physically too small and require a proportional increase in the length of pacing leads with their significant growth rate. Therefore, there is a great need for biopacemakers that may overcome the deficiencies of electronic devices.
Progress Report: 
  • This goal of this project is to improve the yield of pacemaking cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) that can be used to engineer biopacemaker. We have demonstrated that manipulation of the membrane potential of hiPSCs using small molecules can upregulate genes of the desired cell type progressing to the pacemaking cells at all differentiation stages. In the differentiation stage to mesodermal cells, treated hiPSCs exhibit a membrane potential that is further down the differentiation path than untreated control. This source was this change was examined.
  • We continued our work in improving the yield of pacemaking cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) that can be used to engineer biopacemakers. The ion channel isoform responsible for the induced membrane potential changes in hiPSCs and their differentiating cardiac progeny was determined. We focused on optimizing the duration and the timing of membrane potential manipulation in improving the efficiency of pro-pacemaking cardiac progenitor cells and pacemaking cells.
Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Development - Research
Grant Number: 
DR2A-05394
Investigator: 
Name: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
Type: 
Co-PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$19 999 899
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Patients with end-stage heart failure have a 2-year survival rate of only 50% with conventional medical therapy. This dismal survival rate is actually significantly worse than patients with AIDS, liver cirrhosis, stroke, and other comparable debilitating diseases. Currently available therapies for end stage heart failure include drug and device therapies, as well as heart transplantation. While drug and device therapies have proven effective at reducing symptoms, hospitalizations and deaths due to heart failure, new approaches are clearly required to improve this low survival rate. Organ transplantation is highly effective at increasing patient survival, but is severely limited in its potential for broad-based application by the very low number of hearts that are available for transplantation each year. Stem cell therapy may be a promising strategy for improving heart failure patient outcomes by transplanting cells rather than a whole heart. Several studies have convincingly shown that human embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) and that these cells can be used to improve cardiac function following a heart attack. The key objective of this CIRM Disease Team Therapy proposal is to perform the series of activities necessary to obtain FDA approval to initiate clinical testing of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in end stage heart failure patients.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the number one cause of mortality and morbidity in the US. The American Heart Association has estimated that 5.7 million Americans currently suffer from heart failure, and that another 670,000 patients develop this disease annually. Cardiovascular disease has been estimated to result in an estimated $286 billion in direct and indirect costs in the US annually (NHLBI, 2010). As the most populous state in the nation, California bears a substantial fraction of the social and economic costs of this devastating disease. In recent years, stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising candidate for treating ischemic heart disease. Research by our group and others has demonstrated that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be differentiated to cardiomyocytes using robust, scalable, and cGMP-compliant manufacturing processes, and that hESC-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) can improve cardiac function in relevant preclinical animal models. In this proposal, we seek to perform the series of manufacturing, product characterization, nonclinical testing, clinical protocol development, and regulatory activities necessary to enable filing of an IND for hESC-CMs within four years. These IND development activities will be in support of a Phase 1 clinical trial to test hESC-CMs in heart failure patients for the first time. If successful, this program will both pave the way for a promising new therapy to treat Californians with heart failure numbering in the hundreds of thousands, and will further enhance California’s continuing prominence as a leader in the promising field of stem cell research and therapeutics.
Progress Report: 
  • Patients with end-stage heart failure (ESHF), which can result from heart attacks, have a 2-year survival rate of 50% with conventional medical therapy. Unlike cells of other organs, the billions of cardiomyocytes lost due to damage or disease do not regenerate. Recently, implantable mechanical pumps that take over the function of the failing left ventricle (left ventricular assist devices; LVADs) have been used to prolong the lives of heart failure patients. However, these devices carry an increased risk of stroke. The only current bona fide cure for ESHF is heart transplantation, but the shortage of donor organs and the risks associated with life-long use of powerful immunosuppressive drugs limit the number of patients that can be helped.
  • Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the unique properties of being able to grow without limit and to be converted into all the cell types of the body, including cardiomyocytes. Our project seeks to find ways to treat patients by replacing their lost cardiomyocytes with healthy ones derived from hESC. The ultimate goal of this 4 year project is to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of this approach in both small and large animal models of heart disease and to use this data to initiate a clinical trial to test the therapy in patients.
  • In our first year, we developed methods for producing essentially unlimited quantities of cardiomyocytes from hESCs using a process that is compatible both with clinical needs and large-scale industrial cell production. We have also developed models of heart disease in both rats and pigs, and have begun transplanting the stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes into the rat model. We have demonstrated that stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes can engraft in this animal model and we are testing their effects on the pumping function of the heart, the growth of replacement blood vessels lost during a heart attack, and the size of the scar that typically forms after injury. In the next several years, we will continue to evaluate the safety and function of these cells and will start to transplant in our large animal model of heart disease, which will enable us to test these cells in a heart with very similar characteristics to humans, delivered in a minimally invasive way that would be ideal for clinical use.
Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Development - Research
Grant Number: 
DR2A-05735
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
Institution: 
Type: 
Co-PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$19 782 136
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
The proposed research will demonstrate both safety and efficacy of a heart-derived stem cell product in patients who have experienced a heart attack either recently or in the past by conducting a mid-stage clinical trial. A prior early-stage trial showed that the product can repair damaged portions of the heart after a heart attack in ways that no commercial therapy currently can. Damaged areas turn irreversibly into scar tissue after the initial event, which can predispose a person to future events and lead to an ongoing worsening of general and heart health. Data from the early-stage trial suggest that treatment with the heart-derived cell product under development can turn scar tissue back into healthy heart muscle. The planned mid-stage trial will hopefully confirm that finding in a larger patient group and provide additional data to support the safety profile of the product. The product is manufactured using heart tissue obtained from a healthy donor and can be used in most other individuals. Its effect is thought to be long-lasting (months-years) although it is expected to be cleared from the body relatively quickly (weeks-months). Treatment is administered during a single brief procedure, requiring a local anesthetic and insertion of a tube (or catheter) into the heart. The overriding goal for the product is to prevent patients who have had a heart attack from deteriorating over time and developing heart failure, a condition which is defined by the heart’s inability to pump blood efficiently and one which affects millions of Americans. Successful completion of the proposed mid-stage trial would lead next to a final, confirmatory trial and then to the application process by which permission to market the product is obtained from the Food and Drug Administration. The end result could be an affordable stem cell therapy effective as part of a treatment regimen after a heart attack.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The manufacturer of the heart-derived stem cell product under development is a California-based small company who currently employs 7 California residents. Five new local jobs will be created to support the proposed project. Three medical centers located in California will participate in the proposed mid-stage clinical trial. The trial will hopefully bring notoriety to both the company and the medical centers involved while at the same time provide a novel therapeutic option for the many citizens of California afflicted with heart disease. Recent statistics place California among the 50% of states with the highest death rates for heart disease. Therefore, a successfully developed cell product could have a meaningful impact on the home population. Furthermore, as manufacturing needs grow to accommodate the demands of early commercialization, the company anticipates generating 100+ new biotech jobs.
Progress Report: 
  • This project aims to demonstrate both safety and efficacy of a heart-derived cell product in patients who have experienced a heart attack either recently or in the past by conducting a mid-stage (Phase II) clinical trial. The cell product is manufactured using heart tissue obtained from a healthy donor and can be used in most other individuals. Its effect is thought to be long-lasting (months-years) although it is expected to be cleared from the body relatively quickly (weeks-months). Treatment is administered during a single brief procedure, requiring a local anesthetic and insertion of a tube (or catheter) into the heart. The overriding goal for the product is to prevent patients who have had a heart attack from deteriorating over time and developing heart failure, a condition which is defined by the heart’s inability to pump blood efficiently and one which affects millions of Americans. At the outset of the project, a Phase I trial was underway. By the close of the current reporting period, the Phase 1 trial had reached its main safety endpoint, and the Phase II trial was approved to proceed. Fourteen patients were treated with the heart-derived cell product as part of Phase I. The safety endpoint for the trial was pre-defined and took into consideration the following: inflammation in the heart accompanied by an immune response, death due to abnormal heart rhythms, sudden death, repeat heart attack, treatment for symptoms of heart failure, need for a heart assist device, and need for a heart transplant. Both an independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) and CIRM agreed that Phase I met its safety endpoint and that Phase II was approved to proceed. The Phase I participants continue to be monitored for safety and efficacy. Meanwhile, the manufacturing processes established to create cell products for use in Phase I, were employed to create cell products in anticipation of Phase II. A supply of products was readied for use in Phase II. Also in anticipation of Phase II, a number of clinical sites were readied for participation. Manufacturing data and trial status updates were also provided to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
  • This project aims to demonstrate both safety and efficacy of a heart-derived cell product in patients who have experienced a heart attack either recently or in the past by conducting a mid-stage (Phase II) clinical trial. The cell product is manufactured using heart tissue obtained from a healthy donor and can be used in most other individuals. Its effect is thought to be long-lasting (months-years) although it is expected to be cleared from the body relatively quickly (weeks-months). Treatment is administered during a single brief procedure, requiring a local anesthetic and insertion of a tube (or catheter) into the heart. The overriding goal for the product is to prevent patients who have had a heart attack from deteriorating over time and developing heart failure, a condition which is defined by the heart’s inability to pump blood efficiently and one which affects millions of Americans. At the outset of the project, a Phase I trial was underway. The Phase II trial was initiated at the beginning of the current reporting period, and all subjects enrolled in Phase I completed follow up during the current reporting period. Fourteen patients were treated with the heart-derived cell product as part of Phase I. The safety endpoint for the trial was pre-defined and took into consideration the following: inflammation in the heart accompanied by an immune response, death due to abnormal heart rhythms, sudden death, repeat heart attack, treatment for symptoms of heart failure, need for a heart assist device, and need for a heart transplant. Both an independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) and CIRM agreed that Phase I met its safety endpoint. Preliminary efficacy data from Phase I collected during the current reporting period showed evidence of improvements in scar size, a measure of damage in the heart, and ejection fraction, a measure of the heart’s ability to pump blood. At the end of the current reporting period, Phase II is still enrolling subjects and clinical trial sites are still being brought on for participation in the trial. Meanwhile, the manufacturing processes established continue to be employed to create cell products for use in Phase II. Manufacturing data and trial status updates were also provided to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as part of standard annual reporting.

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