Blood Disorders

Coding Dimension ID: 
278
Coding Dimension path name: 
Blood Disorders
Funding Type: 
Basic Biology II
Grant Number: 
RB2-01497
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 430 908
Disease Focus: 
Blood Disorders
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

The discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology promises to revolutionize our understanding of human disease and to allow the development of new cellular therapies for regenerative medicine applications. The ability to reprogram a patient's fibroblasts to iPS cells creates the opportunity to expand human cells with a specific genetic defect and to study that defect in a defined cell population, either to understand the basic biology of the disease or to study potential therapeutics. Furthermore, the genetic defects in iPS cells can be repaired and the iPS cells used as a source for cellular therapies after differentiation to specific cell lineages. Although tremendous strides have been made in recent years in treating human disease, replacing damaged tissue remains almost completely beyond our grasp. Harnessing human iPS stem cells for this purpose will open completely new areas of regenerative medicine. However, a limited understanding of iPS cell self-renewal and differentiation is a major roadblock in realizing this long-term goal.

One shared characteristic of iPS cells and adult stem cells that reside in many of our tissues is the ability to self-renew. Self-renewal is the ability of a stem cell to divide and give rise to a daughter cell that is undifferentiated and capable of giving rise to all the same lineages as the parent stem cell. Senescence pathways – pathways that cause dividing cells to permanently stop dividing – represents a significant barrier in the reprogramming process to engineer new iPS cells. Understanding how iPS cells self-renew is critical for determining how to maintain these cells, how to differentiate them toward specific tissue lineages and how to expand more committed stem cells or progenitor cells in cell culture.

In this proposal, we investigate the molecular mechanism of self-renewal and senescence in human iPS cells using skin cells isolated from patients with a defect in the enzyme telomerase. Telomerase is an enzyme complex expressed in embryonic stem cells, some tissue stem cells and in almost all human cancers. Most differentiated cells lack telomerase expression. Telomerase adds DNA repeats to structures at the ends of our chromosomes, termed telomeres. Telomeres are very important in protecting chromosome ends and in preventing chromosome ends from breaking down or sticking to other ends inappropriately. By maintaining telomeres, telomerase supports the ability of stem cells to divide a large number of times. People with telomerase mutations develop a stem cell disease – dykeratosis congenita. In this disease, patients have defects in skin, blood and lung – tissues that depend on tissue stem cell function to maintain these organs during life. We will reprogram skin cells from dyskeratosis patients to understand how senescence responses limit iPS cell self-renewal and differentiation to specific cell lineages.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

This proposal will benefit California and its citizen in two general ways. First, I have recruited new scientists to California from Texas and from Brazil to work on this proposal. These are new taxpayers and consumers, which will benefit local businesses. They would have been less likely to come to California in the absence of the CIRM program and its strong emphasis on human stem cell biology. Second, this novel grant will generate new intellectual property in the form of patents. These patents may in fact be licensed to California companies or be used to support the formation of new start-up companies. The growth of such companies has historically fueled much of the profound growth in California. The future of California is linked to new technologies in the stem cell, biotechnology and other technology.

Progress Report: 
  • Over the past year, we have analyzed five induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines engineered from different individuals with a genetic stem cell disease. Dyskeratosis congenita is a rare disease affecting stem cells in multiple tissues. Patients with dyskeratosis congenita develop life-threatening bone marrow failure and pulmonary fibrosis, and are highly prone to cancers. In addition, they develop defects in skin, nails and many other organs. Dyskeratosis congenita is caused by mutations in an enzyme - telomerase - that is particularly important in stem cells. Telomerase elongates telomeres, caps that protect chromosome ends. If telomerase is defective, telomeres shorten and loss of the protective cap at telomeres can cause serious problems in stem cells. It has been very difficult to study this disease because isolating stem cells from dyskeratosis congenita patients is challenging. To overcome this problem, we engineered iPS cells from five patients. This is a way to change skin cells into cells that closely resemble embryonic stem cells - stem cells that can give rise to all tissues within the body. We studied these iPS cells from dyskeratosis congenita patients and found that the type of effects on telomerase were very specific and depended on the specific gene that is mutated in the patient. For example, mutations in TERT, the catalytic protein in the telomerase complex, resulted in a 50% reduction in telomerase activity in the patient's iPS cells. In contrast, mutations in the protein dyskerin, seen in the X-linked form of the disease, reduced telomerase activity by a much greater amount - 90% compared to controls. Mutations in another telomerase protein, TCAB1, left telomerase activity unaffected, but made the enzyme mislocalize within the nucleus. We studied how telomeres elongated with reprogramming of skin cells to iPSCs for each patient. Normal cells from healthy people show significant elongation of telomeres during the making of iPSCs, because telomerase is reactivated during this process. For TERT-mutant patients, elongation still happened, but elongation was significantly blunted. For dyskerin-mutant iPS cells and TCAB1-mutant iPS cells, elongation was completely blocked by the mutations and instead, telomeres shortened during this process and with passage in culture. Importantly, the much more severe telomere defect in dyskerin-mutant and TCAB1-mutant cells corresponds closely with the severity of the disease in the patients themselves. Our data show that iPS cells are a very accurate system for studying dyskeratosis congenita and revealed for the first time that the severity of the disease correlates with the severity of the telomerase defect in stem cells. These findings create new opportunities to study stem cell diseases in cell culture and to develop therapies that could specifically reverse the disease defect.
  • Over the past year, we have generated and analyzed new induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines engineered from different individuals with a genetic stem cell disease. Dyskeratosis congenita is a rare disease affecting stem cells in multiple tissues. Patients with dyskeratosis congenita develop life-threatening bone marrow failure and pulmonary fibrosis, and are highly prone to cancers. In addition, they develop defects in skin, nails and many other organs. Dyskeratosis congenita is caused by mutations in an enzyme - telomerase - that is particularly important in stem cells. Telomerase elongates telomeres, caps that protect chromosome ends. If telomerase is defective, telomeres shorten and loss of the protective cap at telomeres can cause serious problems in stem cells. It has been very difficult to study this disease because isolating stem cells from dyskeratosis congenita patients is challenging. To overcome this problem, we engineered iPS cells from dyskeratosis congenita patients. This is a way to change skin cells into cells that closely resemble embryonic stem cells - stem cells that can give rise to all tissues within the body. We studied these iPS cells from dyskeratosis congenita patients and found that the type of effects on telomerase were very specific and depended on the specific gene that is mutated in the patient. Normal cells from healthy people show significant elongation of telomeres during the making of iPSCs, because telomerase is reactivated during this process. In iPS cells from patients with dyskeratosis congenita by contrast, telomere elongation during reprogramming is compromised. These findings create new opportunities to study stem cell diseases in cell culture and to develop therapies that could specifically reverse the disease defect.
  • Over the past year, we have generated and analyzed new induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines engineered from individuals with a genetic stem cell disease. Dyskeratosis congenita is a rare disease affecting stem cells in multiple tissues. Patients with dyskeratosis congenita develop life-threatening bone marrow failure and pulmonary fibrosis, and are highly prone to cancers. In addition, they develop defects in skin, nails and many other organs. Dyskeratosis congenita is caused by mutations in an enzyme - telomerase - that is particularly important in stem cells. Telomerase elongates telomeres, caps that protect chromosome ends. If telomerase is defective, telomeres shorten and loss of the protective cap at telomeres can cause serious problems in stem cells. It has been very difficult to study this disease because isolating stem cells from dyskeratosis congenita patients is challenging. To overcome this problem, we engineered iPS cells from dyskeratosis congenita patients. This is a way to change skin cells into cells that closely resemble embryonic stem cells - stem cells that can give rise to all tissues within the body. We studied these iPS cells from dyskeratosis congenita patients and found that the type of effects on telomerase were very specific and depended on the specific gene that is mutated in the patient. Normal cells from healthy people show significant elongation of telomeres during the making of iPSCs, because telomerase is reactivated during this process. In iPS cells from patients with dyskeratosis congenita by contrast, telomere elongation during reprogramming is compromised. These findings create new opportunities to study stem cell diseases in cell culture and to develop therapies that could specifically reverse the disease defect.a
  • In the final year of this grant, we developed means to introduce patient mutations into human ES cells. These patient mutations derive from from individuals with a genetic stem cell disease. Dyskeratosis congenita is a rare disease affecting stem cells in multiple tissues. Patients with dyskeratosis congenita develop life-threatening bone marrow failure and pulmonary fibrosis, and are highly prone to cancers. In addition, they develop defects in skin, nails and many other organs. Dyskeratosis congenita is caused by mutations in an enzyme - telomerase - that is particularly important in stem cells. Telomerase elongates telomeres, caps that protect chromosome ends. If telomerase is defective, telomeres shorten and loss of the protective cap at telomeres can cause serious problems in stem cells. It has been very difficult to study this disease because isolating stem cells from dyskeratosis congenita patients is challenging. To overcome this problem, we engineered induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from dyskeratosis congenita patients. This is a way to change skin cells into cells that closely resemble embryonic stem cells - stem cells that can give rise to all tissues within the body. We studied these iPS cells from dyskeratosis congenita patients and found that the type of effects on telomerase were very specific and depended on the specific gene that is mutated in the patient. Normal cells from healthy people show significant elongation of telomeres during the making of iPSCs, because telomerase is reactivated during this process. In iPS cells from patients with dyskeratosis congenita by contrast, telomere elongation during reprogramming is compromised. Introducing mutations from patients directly into human ES cells bypasses the iPS-generation step and has major advantages over the use of iPS cells. These findings create new opportunities to study stem cell diseases in cell culture and to develop therapies that could specifically reverse the disease defect.
Funding Type: 
Disease Team Research I
Grant Number: 
DR1-01452
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
Type: 
Co-PI
Type: 
Co-PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$9 212 365
Disease Focus: 
Blood Disorders
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Sickle cell disease (SCD), which results from an inherited mutation in the hemoglobin gene that causes red blood cells to "sickle" under conditions of low oxygen, occurs with a frequency of 1/500 African-Americans, and is also common in Hispanic-Americans, who comprise up to 5% of SCD patients in California. The median survival based on 1991 national data was 42 years for males and 48 years for females. More recent data indicate that the median survival for Southern California patients with SCD is only 36 years, suggesting that serious problems exist regarding access to optimal medical care in this community. By twenty years of age, about 15% of children with SCD suffer major strokes and by 40 years of age, almost half of the patients have had central nervous system damage leading to significant cognitive dysfunction. These patients suffer recurrent damage to lungs and kidneys as well as severe chronic pain that impacts on quality of life. While current medical therapies for SCD can make an important difference in short-term effects, the progressive deterioration in organ function results in compromised quality of life and early deaths in ethnic populations who are generally adversely affected by health care disparity. Transplantation of bone marrow from a healthy donor as a source of new adult blood-forming ("hematopoietic") stem cells can benefit patients with SCD, by providing a source for life-long production of normal red blood cells. However, bone marrow transplant is limited by the availability of well-matched donors and the problems that arise from immune reactions between the cells of the donor and the patient. Thus, despite major improvements in clinical care of SCD patients, SCD continues to be a major cause of illness and early death.
The stem cell therapy approach to be developed by this Disease Team will be used to treat patients with SCD by transplanting them with their own bone marrow adult hematopoietic stem cells that are genetically corrected by adding a hemoglobin gene that blocks sickling of the red blood cells. This approach has the potential to permanently cure this debilitating and common illness with significantly less toxicity than with a bone marrow transplant from another person. A clinical trial using stem cell gene therapy for patients with SCD will be developed to be performed by this Team. This multi-disciplinary Disease Team combines world-leading experts in stem cell gene therapy, clinical bone marrow transplantation and the care of patients with sickle cell disease. Successful use of stem cell gene therapy for sickle cell disease has the potential to provide a more effective and safe treatment for this disease to a larger proportion of affected patients.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Development of methods for regenerative medicine using genetically-corrected human stem cells will result in novel, effective therapies that improve the health for millions of Californians and tens of millions of people world-wide. Sickle cell disease is an inherited disease of the red blood cells that results from a specific gene mutation. Sickle cell disease disproportionately afflicts poor minority patients in the State of California, causing severe morbidity, early mortality and high medical costs. We will develop a clinical trial to evaluate a novel treatment for patients with sickle cell disease, using their own adult blood-forming stem cells, after correcting the hemoglobin gene defect. Successful treatment of sickle cell disease using adult blood forming “hematopoietic” stem cells corrected with gene therapy may provide a clinically beneficial way to treat sickle cell disease with greater safety and wider availability than current options. The clinical trial to be developed will treat sickle cell disease patients from across the state of California through the network of institutions incorporated into this Disease Team. All scientific findings and biomedical materials produced from our studies will be publicly available to non-profit and academic organizations in California, and any intellectual property developed by this Project will be developed under the guidelines of CIRM to benefit the State of California.

Progress Report: 
  • The clinical complications of sickle cell disease are due to the inherited abnormality of the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin protein in red blood cells (RBC). The RBC are made from stem cells in the bone marrow and transplantation of stem cells from the bone marrow of a healthy donor to someone with sickle cell disease (SCD) can lead to significant improvements in their health. However, most people do not have a matched sibling donor, and transplants from unrelated donors have higher risks for complications, mainly due to immune reactions between the donor and the recipient.
  • The goal of this project is to bring to the clinic a trial of treating patients with SCD by transplanting them with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been modified in the lab by adding the gene for a version of human beta-globin that will act to inhibit sickling of the patient’s RBC (“anti-sickling” gene). This approach may provide a way to improve the health of people with SCD, with advantages over clinical treatments using transplantation of bone marrow stem cells from another person.
  • The major Year 1 Milestone was to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, i.e. that the clinical cell product, the subject’s bone marrow stem cells modified with the anti-sickling gene, can be produced suitably for clinical transplantation and that enough of the anti-sickling hemoglobin is made to reverse sickling of RBC made from the gene-modified stem cells.
  • Studies done by the Laboratory component of our Disease Team showed that the gene transfer lentiviral vector we developed to insert the anti-sickling gene into bone marrow stem cells met pre-set technical criteria for: the amount of vector that can be made, its efficiency to insert the anti-sickling gene into human bone marrow stem cells, the levels of anti-sickling beta-globin protein made by the vector in RBC made from bone marrow stem cells, and the absence of adverse effects on the stem cells or their ability to make new RBC. These successful results allow advancement to the major lab focus for Years 2-3, pre-clinical efficacy and safety studies to support an IND application.
  • The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease team established the proposed network of California clinical hematology sites to obtain bone marrow samples from volunteer donors with SCD for laboratory research studies on cell product development (UCLA, CHLA and CHRCO). We put into place the necessary IRB-approved protocols to collect bone marrow samples at these sites to use for the laboratory research at UCLA and USC. This network obtained its first BM sample from a SCD donor on 3/18/2010 and a total of 15 over the year. These patient-derived samples have been truly essential to the advancement of the laboratory work because bone marrow from SCD patients is needed for studies to measure expression of the anti-sickling gene and improvement in RBC sickling.
  • The Clinical Regulatory component has also produced a complete first draft of the clinical trial protocol, which defines which specific people with SCD would be eligible for participation in this study, and the exact approach of the clinical study, including how the patients will be evaluated before the procedure, the details of the bone marrow harvest, stem cell processing and transplant processes, and how the effects of the procedure will be assessed. This protocol was conceived with input from the Team of physicians and scientists with expertise in clinical and experimental hematology, bone marrow transplantation, transfusion medicine, gene therapy and cell processing laboratory methods, regulatory affairs, and biostatistics.
  • These efforts provided sufficient laboratory data and definition of the clinical approach that we could have a pre-pre-IND exchange with the FDA (on 09/30/10). This interaction provided us the opportunity to receive initial guidance for three key areas that would comprise the IND application: the draft clinical protocol, the methods to make and characterize the gene-modified stem cell product for transplant, and the planned pre-clinical safety studies. The meeting was encouraging and informative.
  • In Year 2, our laboratory work will focus on determining the functional effects of inserting the anti-sickling gene into bone marrow stem cells from SCD donors on sickling of the RBC. We will begin to define the laboratory test methods that would be used to measure the results in the clinical trial (% of stem and blood cells with the gene, the amounts of anti-sickling beta-globin made, and the effects on RBC sickling). We will continue to design the studies to formally test vector safety (Toxicology study). The major goal is to advance to a pre-IND meeting with the FDA which should provide further guidance to finalize the design of the pre-clinical toxicology study and the clinical trial design. We will then be ready to implement the toxicology study and begin regulatory reviews of the protocol by local and federal authorities.
  • The clinical complications of sickle cell disease are due to the inherited abnormality of the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin protein in red blood cells (RBC). The RBC are made from stem cells in the bone marrow and transplantation of stem cells from the bone marrow of a healthy donor to someone with sickle cell disease (SCD) can lead to significant improvements in their health. However, most people do not have a matched sibling donor, and transplants from unrelated donors have higher risks for complications, mainly due to immune reactions between the donor and the recipient.
  • The goal of this project is to bring to the clinical trial of treating patients with SCD by transplanting them with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been modified in the laboratory by adding the gene for a version of human beta-globin that will act to inhibit sickling of the patient’s RBC (“anti-sickling” gene). This approach may provide a way to improve the health of people with SCD, with advantages over clinical treatments using transplantation of bone marrow stem cells from another person.
  • In the first 2 years of this project we were able to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, i.e. that the clinical cell product, the subject’s bone marrow stem cells modified with the anti-sickling gene, can be produced suitably for clinical transplantation and that enough of the anti-sickling hemoglobin is made to reverse sickling of RBC made from the gene-modified stem cells.
  • Studies done by the Laboratory component of our Disease Team showed that the gene transfer lentiviral vector we developed to insert the anti-sickling gene into bone marrow stem cells met pre-set technical criteria for: the amount of vector that can be made, its efficiency to insert the anti-sickling gene into human bone marrow stem cells, the levels of anti-sickling beta-globin protein made by the vector in RBC, and the absence of adverse effects on the stem cells or their ability to make new RBC. These successful results allow advancement to the major lab focus for Year 3, safety studies to support an IND application.
  • The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease team established the proposed network of California clinical hematology sites to obtain bone marrow samples from volunteer donors with SCD for laboratory research studies on cell product development (UCLA, CHLA and CHRCO). We put into place the necessary IRB-approved protocols to collect bone marrow samples at these sites to use for the laboratory research at UCLA and USC. This network obtained its first BM sample from a SCD donor on 3/18/2010 and a total of 29 over 2 years. These patient-derived samples have been truly essential to the advancement of the laboratory work because bone marrow from SCD patients is needed for studies to measure expression of the anti-sickling gene and improvement in RBC sickling.
  • The Clinical Regulatory component has also produced a complete first draft of the clinical trial protocol, which defines which specific people with SCD would be eligible for participation in this study, and the exact approach of the clinical study, including how the patients will be evaluated before the procedure, the details of the bone marrow harvest, stem cell processing and transplant processes, and how the effects of the procedure will be assessed. This protocol was conceived with input from the Team of physicians and scientists with expertise in clinical and experimental hematology, bone marrow transplantation, transfusion medicine, gene therapy and cell processing laboratory methods, regulatory affairs, and biostatistics.
  • These efforts provided sufficient laboratory data and definition of the clinical approach that we could have a pre-IND meeting with the FDA (on 08/22/11). This interaction provided us the opportunity to receive guidance for three key areas that would comprise the IND application: the draft clinical protocol, the methods to make and characterize the gene-modified stem cell product for transplant, and the planned pre-clinical safety studies. The meeting was encouraging and informative.
  • In Year 3, our laboratory work will focus on performing pre-clinical safety studies (Toxicology study), qualifying end point assays and finalizing stem cell processing.
  • The clinical complications of sickle cell disease are due to the inherited abnormality of the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin protein in red blood cells (RBC). The RBC are made from stem cells in the bone marrow and transplantation of stem cells from the bone marrow of a healthy donor to someone with sickle cell disease (SCD) can lead to significant improvements in their health. However, most people do not have a matched sibling donor, and transplants from unrelated donors have higher risks for complications, mainly due to immune reactions between the donor and the recipient.
  • The goal of this project is to develop a clinical trial to treat patients with SCD by transplanting them with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been modified in the laboratory by adding the gene for a version of human beta-globin that will act to inhibit sickling of the patient’s RBC (“anti-sickling” gene). This approach may provide a way to improve the health of people with SCD, with advantages over clinical treatments using transplantation of bone marrow stem cells from another person.
  • In the first 2 years of this project we demonstrated the feasibility of this approach, i.e. that the clinical cell product, the subject’s bone marrow stem cells modified with the anti-sickling gene, can be produced suitably for clinical transplantation and that enough of the anti-sickling hemoglobin is made to reverse sickling of RBC made from the gene-modified stem cells. The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease Team established the proposed network of California clinical hematology sites to obtain bone marrow samples from volunteer donors with SCD for laboratory research studies on cell product development (UCLA, CHLA and CHRCO). We put into place the necessary IRB-approved protocols to collect bone marrow samples at these sites to use for the laboratory research at UCLA and USC. This network obtained its first BM sample from a SCD donor on 3/18/2010 and a total of 45 over 3 years. These patient-derived samples have been truly essential to the advancement of the laboratory work because bone marrow from SCD patients is needed for studies to measure expression of the anti-sickling gene and improvement in RBC sickling. The Clinical Regulatory component has also produced the clinical trial protocol, which defines which specific people with SCD would be eligible for participation in this study, and the exact approach of the clinical study, including how the patients will be evaluated before the procedure, the details of the bone marrow harvest, stem cell processing and transplant processes, and how the effects of the procedure will be assessed. This protocol was conceived with input from the Team of physicians and scientists with expertise in clinical and experimental hematology, bone marrow transplantation, transfusion medicine, gene therapy and cell processing laboratory methods, regulatory affairs, and biostatistics.
  • During the third year the Clinical Gene Therapy Laboratory component of the Team has demonstrated the feasibility of the stem cell processing procedure. Mimicking the future clinical scenario, the Lab was able to isolate stem cells from a largescale bone marrow harvest, insert the anti-sickling gene in adequate amount and recover the needed amount of stem cells that would be transplanted into the patient. The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease Team is focusing on validating all the assays that will be used during the clinical trial i.e. to characterize the final cell product and also the end-point assays to analyze the efficacy of this approach in patients. Another major focus during the third year has been safety and toxicology studies in a murine model of bone marrow transplant; the studies are still ongoing and will be completed in the next year. These successful results allow advancement to support an IND application in year 4.
  • CIRM DR1-01452 - Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease
  • Scientific Progress in Year 4
  • The clinical complications of sickle cell disease are due to the inherited abnormality of the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin protein in red blood cells (RBC). The RBC are made from stem cells in the bone marrow and transplantation of stem cells from the bone marrow of a healthy donor to someone with sickle cell disease (SCD) can lead to significant improvements in their health. However, most people do not have a matched sibling donor, and transplants from unrelated donors have higher risks for complications, mainly due to immune reactions between the donor and the recipient.
  • The goal of this project is to develop a clinical trial to treat patients with SCD by transplanting them with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been modified in the laboratory by adding the gene for a version of human beta-globin that will act to inhibit sickling of the patient’s RBC (“anti-sickling” gene). This approach may provide a way to improve the health of people with SCD, with advantages over clinical treatments using transplantation of bone marrow stem cells from another person.
  • In the first 2 years of this project, we demonstrated the feasibility of this approach, i.e. that the clinical cell product, the subject’s bone marrow stem cells modified with the anti-sickling gene, can be produced suitably for clinical transplantation and that enough of the anti-sickling hemoglobin is made to reverse sickling of RBC made from the gene-modified stem cells. The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease Team established the proposed network of California clinical hematology sites to obtain bone marrow samples from volunteer donors with SCD for laboratory research studies on cell product development (UCLA, CHLA and CHRCO). We put into place the necessary IRB-approved protocols to collect bone marrow samples at these sites to use for the laboratory research at UCLA and USC. This network obtained its first BM sample from a SCD donor on 3/18/2010 and a total of 56 over 4 years. These patient-derived samples have been truly essential to the advancement of the laboratory work because bone marrow from SCD patients is needed for studies to measure expression of the anti-sickling gene and improvement in RBC sickling. The Clinical Regulatory component has also produced the clinical trial protocol, which defines which specific people with SCD would be eligible for participation in this study, and the exact approach of the clinical study, including how the patients will be evaluated before the procedure, the details of the bone marrow harvest, stem cell processing and transplant processes, and how the effects of the procedure will be assessed. This protocol was conceived with input from the Team of physicians and scientists with expertise in clinical and experimental hematology, bone marrow transplantation, transfusion medicine, gene therapy and cell processing laboratory methods, regulatory affairs, and biostatistics. It has now been approved by the UCLA Institutional Review Board and the Institutional Scientific Protocol review Committee, as well as the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee.
  • During the last 2 years the Clinical Gene Therapy Laboratory component of the Team has demonstrated the feasibility of the stem cell processing procedure. Mimicking the future clinical scenario, the Lab was able to isolate stem cells from a large scale bone marrow harvest, insert the anti-sickling gene in adequate amount and recover the needed amount of stem cells that would be transplanted into the patient. The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease Team validated all the assays that will be used during the clinical trial i.e. to characterize the final cell product and also the end-point assays to analyze the efficacy of this approach in patients. Another major focus during the third and fourth year has been safety and toxicology studies in a murine model of bone marrow transplant; these successful results allow advancement to support an IND application in the second quarter of 2014, with a goal of opening the trial in the third quarter of the year.
  • The clinical complications of sickle cell disease are due to the inherited abnormality of the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin protein in red blood cells (RBC). The RBC are made from stem cells in the bone marrow and transplantation of stem cells from the bone marrow of a healthy donor to someone with sickle cell disease (SCD) can lead to significant improvements in their health. However, most people do not have a matched sibling donor, and transplants from unrelated donors have higher risks for complications, mainly due to immune reactions between the donor and the recipient.
  • The goal of this project is to develop a clinical trial to treat patients with SCD by transplanting them with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been modified in the laboratory by adding the gene for a version of human beta-globin that will act to inhibit sickling of the patient’s RBC (“anti-sickling” gene). This approach may provide a way to improve the health of people with SCD, with advantages over clinical treatments using transplantation of bone marrow stem cells from another person.
  • In the first 2 years of this project, we demonstrated the feasibility of this approach, i.e. that the clinical cell product, the subject’s bone marrow stem cells modified with the anti-sickling gene, can be produced suitably for clinical transplantation and that enough of the anti-sickling hemoglobin is made to reverse sickling of RBC made from the gene-modified stem cells. The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease Team established the proposed network of California clinical hematology sites to obtain bone marrow samples from volunteer donors with SCD for laboratory research studies on cell product development (UCLA, CHLA and CHRCO). We put into place the necessary IRB-approved protocols to collect bone marrow samples at these sites to use for the laboratory research at UCLA and USC. This network obtained its first BM sample from a SCD donor on 3/18/2010 and a total of 58 over 4+ years. These patient-derived samples have been truly essential to the advancement of the laboratory work because bone marrow from SCD patients is needed for studies to measure expression of the anti-sickling gene and improvement in RBC sickling. The Clinical Regulatory component has also produced the clinical trial protocol, which defines which specific people with SCD would be eligible for participation in this study, and the exact approach of the clinical study, including how the patients will be evaluated before the procedure, the details of the bone marrow harvest, stem cell processing and transplant processes, and how the effects of the procedure will be assessed. This protocol was conceived with input from the Team of physicians and scientists with expertise in clinical and experimental hematology, bone marrow transplantation, transfusion medicine, gene therapy and cell processing laboratory methods, regulatory affairs, and biostatistics. It has now been approved by the UCLA Institutional Review Board and the Institutional Scientific Protocol review Committee, as well as the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee.
  • During the last 2 years the Clinical Gene Therapy Laboratory component of the Team has demonstrated the feasibility of the stem cell processing procedure. Mimicking the future clinical scenario, the Lab was able to isolate stem cells from a large scale bone marrow harvest, insert the anti-sickling gene in adequate amount and recover the needed amount of stem cells that would be transplanted into the patient. The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease Team validated all the assays that will be used during the clinical trial i.e. to characterize the final cell product and also the end-point assays to analyze the efficacy of this approach in patients. Another major focus during the third and fourth year has been to demonstrate the safety of this approach in a murine model of bone marrow transplant; these successful results allowed advancement to support an IND application and opening a clinical trial for gene therapy of SCD in the second quarter of 2014.
Funding Type: 
Basic Biology I
Grant Number: 
RB1-01328
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 371 477
Disease Focus: 
Blood Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Directly Reprogrammed Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Hematopoietic cells are responsible for generating all cell types present in the blood and therefore critical for the provision of oxygen and nutrients to all the tissues in the body. Blood cells are also required for defense against microorganisms and even for the recognition and elimination of tumor cells. Because blood cells have a relatively short life-span, our bone marrow is constantly producing new cells from hematopoietic progenitors and responding to the relative needs to our tissues and organs. Blood cancers (leukemias), as well as other disorders or treatments that affect the production of blood cells (such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy) can significantly jeopardized health. Transfusions are done to aid the replacement of blood cell loss, but pathogens and immunological compatibility are significant and frequent roadblocks.

In this grant application, we present experiments to further understand how another cell in the body, the endothelium, located in the inside wall of all our vessels, can be coax to produce large numbers of hematopoietic cells with indistinguishable immunological properties from those in the bone marrow of each individual. Endothelial cells are easily obtained from skin biopsies or from umbilical cord and they can be expanded in Petri dishes. The experiments outlined were designed to further understand how endothelial cells are capable of generating blood cells during development. This information will be used to entice endothelial cells to generate hematopoietic cell progenitors in vitro.

The impact of this research is broad because of its clinical applicability and because of its potential to decipher the mechanisms used by endothelial cells to undergo normal reprogramming and generate undifferentiated progenitor cells of a distinct lineage. Adult cell reprogramming is one of the fundamental premises of stem cell research and thus, highly relevant to the main goals identified by the CIRM program.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Technology developed from this grant application has the potential to be translated directly to clinical settings. This technology is extremely likely to engender interest by the big pharma which can potentially license the information from the University of California or purchase the patent for the invention / technology. Naturally this will bring revenues and recognition to the state of California. Furthermore, California will remain ahead of the technological wave that takes advantage of stem cell technology and implements innovative medical treatments in the entire country and abroad.

In addition, the execution of this proposal will immediately provide employment to four individuals, two of these trainees in stem cell research. Indirectly, the grant will also support salaries of employees at the university associated with research, animal care and administration.

Progress Report: 
  • During this year, we have demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cells are originated from the cells that line the inside of blood vessels, named endothelial cells. Budding of hematopoietic stem cells from endothelial cells occurs during a specific and restricted time window during development and progress has been made to elucidate the regulatory genetic networks involved in this process. We have also demonstrated that hemogenic endothelium is derived from one specific embryonic tissue (lateral plate mesoderm). This information will be used to recapitulate similar conditions in vitro and induce the growth of hematopoietic stem cells outside the body from adult endothelial cells.
  • The objective of this proposal was to identify factors that allow blood vessels to generate hematopoietic stem cells early in the embryonic stage. The process of blood generation from vessels is a normal step in development, but it is poorly understood. We predicted that precise information related to the operational factors in the embryo would allow us to reproduce this process in a petri dish and generate hematopoietic stem cells when needed (situations associated with blood transplantation or cancer).
  • In the second year of this proposal, we have made significant progress and identified critical factors that are responsible for the generation of hematopoietic stem cells from the endothelium (inner layer of blood vessels). These experiments were performed in mouse embryos, as it would be impossible do achieve this goal in human samples. The genes identified are not novel, but have not been associated with this capacity previously. To verify our findings we have independently performed additional experiments and validated the information obtained from sequencing the transcripts.
  • In addition, we developed a series of novel tools to test the biological relevance of the genes identified in vivo (using mouse embryos). Specifically, we have tested whether forced expression of these genes could induce the generation of hematopoietic stem cells. Interestingly, we found that a single manipulation was not sufficient, but multiple and specific manipulations resulted in the generation of blood from endothelium. This was a very exciting result as indicated that we are in the right track and identified factors that can reprogram blood vessels to bud blood stem cells. With this information at hand, we moved into human cells (in petri dishes).
  • The first step was to test whether human endothelial cells could offer a supportive niche for the growth of hematopoietic cells. To our surprise, we found that in the absence of any manipulation, endothelial cells could direct differentiation and support the expansion of CD34+ cells (progenitor blood cells) to a very specific blood cell type, named macrophages. These were rather unexpected results that indicated the ability of endothelial cells to offer a niche for a selective group of blood cells. The final question in the proposal was to test whether the modification of endothelial cells with the identified factors could induce the formation of blood from these cells. For this, we have generated specific reagents and are currently performing the final series of experiments.
  • In this grant application we have been able to investigate the mechanisms by which endothelial cells, the cells that line the inner aspects of the entire circulatory system, produce blood cells. This capacity, called “hemogenic” (giving rise to blood) can be extremely advantageous in pathological situations when generation of new blood cells are needed, such as during leukemia or in organ-transplantation. Although the hemogenic capacity of the endothelium is, under normal conditions, restricted development we have been able to “reprogram” this ability in endothelial cells. For this, we first investigated the genes that responsible for this hemogenic activity during development using mouse models and tissue culture cells. Using this strategy we found key transcription factors in hemogenic endothelium not present in other (non-hemogenic) endothelial cells. Subsequently, we validated that these genes were able to convey hemogenic capacity when expressed in non-hemogenic sites. Finally, using human endothelial cells, we have been able to impose expression of these key transcription factors in endothelial cells. Our data indicates that the forced expression of these factors is able to initiate a program that is likely to result in blood cell generation. The progress achieved through this grant place us in a remarkable position to carry out pre-clinical trials to evaluate the potential of this technology.
Funding Type: 
Preclinical Development Awards
Grant Number: 
PC1-08111
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
Institution: 
Type: 
Co-PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Blood Disorders
Immune Disease
Genetic Disorder
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 

Severe combined immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the IL2RG gene on the x-chromosome (SCID-X1 or "bubble boy disease") is a devastating genetic disease that results in boys not being able to form an immune system. If they are exposed to the environment for even a short period of time they can get infections that a normal immune system would eliminate without problems but instead can be lethal. While in the past the only treatment for this disease was to keep the boys protected from the environment by being isolated in a bubble, hence its colloquial name, now we treat SCID-X1 with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT). In allo-BMT the defective immune system of the patient is replaced by the functional immune system of the donor. Allo-BMT now saves the life of 70-95% of patients depending on where the donor immune system comes from and how sick the patient is before receiving the transplant. There remain, however, significant limitations to allo-BMT. These include that in some patients the new immune system is still not as good as a normal immune system, thus keeping the patient at risk for lethal infections, and toxicity from the new immune system causing a reaction in which the donor immune system sees the patient as "foreign" and attacks the tissues causing graft vs host disease. In rare patients, however, a single stem or progenitor cell that gives rise to the immune system will have a spontaneous mutation that reverts the disease causing DNA sequence back into a non-disease causing sequence thereby correcting the gene. The goal of this program is to develop a specific gene correction procedure that could be applied to almost every patient with SCID-X1 rather than to it naturally occur in an extremely rare lucky few.

Towards this end we have developed a system in which we make a specific break in the IL2RG gene. This break activates the cell to repair the break and we can take advantage of the cell fixing the break to insert a good copy of the gene at the site of the break. In this way, we utilize the cell's own repair machinery to fix the gene. We have shown that we can do gene repair in human blood stem and progenitor cells from anyone and create corrected cells thousands of corrected stem and progenitor cells rather than just a single cell rarely occurs naturally. We have shown that these modified cells can create blood cells, including immune cells. The goal of this specific project is to further improve the gene correction system by optimizing the different components, to assure that the gene correction system is safe and does not cause deleterious effects in the blood stem and progenitor cells, to scale the process up to a size that would be needed to treat a patient and to perform the regulatory tasks that are needed to bring what would be a first-in-human gene correction approach to patients.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

SCID-X1 is a rare disease that only affects a handful of patients in the state of California each year. Finding a genetic cure based on gene correction, therefore, might seem not to be of great benefit to the state of California or its citizens, This would be a mistaken impression for several reasons. For the handful of patient's and families that are affected that are affected every year, dealing with the disease will be among the most challenging life events they will ever face and finding a gene correction cure would be of tremendous, life-changing benefit to them. Moreover, t's significance far outstrips its incidence because of its notoriety as the "bubble boy disease" and the recognition that it is a seminal proof-of-concept genetic disease. That is, if one can figure out how to genetically correct stem cells to cure SCID-X1 then that provides the foundation for a strategy to genetically correct stem cells that cause a multitude of other genetic diseases. That is, a pipeline for gene correction for all children with genetic diseases in California will be started. As succinctly summarized by the head of research and development of a large international pharmaceutical company "One will get you a hundred."

While the medical benefits of first curing SCID-X1 and then curing other genetic diseases is clear, the financial ramifications of turning chronic lifelong genetic diseases that directly cost society sometimes millions of dollars per patient per lifetime and indirectly cost society even more into acute diseases that can be cured with one procedure are enormous.

Finally, California attracts the best and the brightest from all over the world because it is known as a place where transformative, innovative, and impactful discoveries are made and supported. When we are successful with this definitive and innovative approach to curing a genetic disease, it will continue to re-affirm the seminal importance of California and its citizens in making the world a better place.

Funding Type: 
Alpha Stem Cell Clinics
Grant Number: 
AC1-07659
Investigator: 
Name: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$8 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Blood Disorders
Blood Cancer
Cancer
HIV/AIDS
Solid Tumor
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 

As the largest provider of bone marrow cell transplants in California, and the second largest in the nation, our institution has great expertise and an excellent record of safety in the delivery of stem cell treatments. We now propose to create the Alpha Clinic for Cell Therapy and Innovation (ACT-I) in which new, state-of-the-art, stem cell treatments for cancer and devastating blood-related diseases will be conducted and evaluated. As these experimental therapies prove to be effective, and become routine practice, our ACT-I Program will serve as the clinical center for delivery of these treatments. ACT-I will be an integral part of our Hematologic Malignancy and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute, placing it in the center of our institutional strengths, expertise, infrastructure and investment over the next decade. To move quickly once the CIRM award is made, ACT-I can be launched within our institution’s Day Hospital, a brand new, outpatient blood stem cell transplantation center opened in late 2013 with California Department of Health approval for 24 hour a day operation. This will ensure that ACT-I will have all the clinical and regulatory expertise, trained personnel, state-of-the-art facilities and other infrastructure in place to conduct first-in-human clinical trials and to deliver future, stem cell-based therapies for cancer and blood-related diseases, including AIDS. When our new Ambulatory Treatment Center is complete in 2018, it will double our capacity for patient visits and allow for expansion of the ACT-I pipeline of new stem cell products in a state-of-the-art facility.

Beyond our campus, we operate satellite clinics covering an area that includes urban, suburban and rural sites. More than 17.7 million people live in this area, and represent some of the greatest racial and ethnic diversity seen in any part of the country. Our ACT-I is prepared to serve a significant, diverse and underserved portion of the population of California.

CLINICAL TRIALS. Our proposal has two lead clinical trials that will be the first to be tested in ACT-I. One will deliver transplants of blood stem cells that have been modified to treat patients suffering from AIDS and lymphoma. The second will use neural stem cells to deliver drugs directly to cancer cells hiding in the brain. These studies represent some of the new and exciting biomedical technologies being developed at our institution. In addition to the two lead trials, we have several additional clinical studies poised to use and be tested in this special facility for clinical trials. In summary, ACT-I is well prepared to accommodate the long list of clinical trials and begin to fulfill the promise of providing new stem cell therapies for the citizens of California.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

California’s citizens voted for the California Stem Cell Research and Cures Act to support the development of stem cell-based therapies that treat incurable diseases and relieve human suffering. To achieve this goal, we propose to establish an Alpha Clinic for Cellular Therapies and Innovation (ACT-I) as an integral part of our Hematological Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute, and serve as the clinical center for the testing and delivery of new, cutting-edge, cellular treatments for cancer and other blood-related diseases. Our institution is uniquely well-suited to serve as a national leader in the study and delivery of stem cell therapeutics because we are the largest provider of stem cell transplants in California, and the second largest in the country. According to national benchmarking data, our Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation program is the only program in the nation to have achieved survival outcomes above expectation for each of the past nine years. This program currently offers financially sustainable, research-driven clinical care for patients with cancer, HIV and other life-threatening diseases. CIRM funding will allow the ACT-I clinic to ramp up quickly, drawing upon institutionally established protocols, personnel and infrastructure to conduct first-in-human clinical trials for assessment of efficacy. As CIRM funding winds down, ACT-I will have institutional support to offer proven cellular therapeutics to patients. The lead studies at the forefront of the ACT-I pipeline of clinical trials focus on treatments for HIV-1 infection and brain tumors, two devastating and incurable conditions. These first trials are closely followed by a robust queue of other stem cell therapeutics for leukemia, lymphoma, prostate cancer, brain cancers and thalassemia.

Our long list of proposed treatments addresses diseases that have a major impact on the lives of Californians. Thalassemia is found in up to 1 in 2,200 children born in California; prostate cancer affects 211,300 men, and HIV-1 infection occurs in 111,000 of our citizens. From 2008 to 2010, 6,705 Californians were diagnosed with brain cancers, 4,580 of whom died. In considering hematological malignancies during this same period, 2,800 patients were diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma (416 died), 20,351 with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (6,241 died), 13,358 with leukemia (6,961 died), 3,900 with acute myelogenous leukemia (2,972 died), 2,129 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (648 died) and 4,198 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (1,271 died). Standard of care fails in many cases; mortality rates for patients with hematological malignancies range from 25% to 76%. Successful stem cell therapeutics hold the promise to reduce disease-related mortality while improving disease-related survival and quality of life for the citizens of California, and for those affected by these diseases worldwide.

Progress Report: 
  • The CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinic (ASCC) was opened at City of Hope on March 1, 2015. The award is intended to enable researchers to pursue important work that aims to bring the potential of stem cell treatments to fruition. Two clinical trials were identified to launch this center, and in the first year, we have added 8 additional studies. The current and future clinical studies include:
  • • Transplants of blood stem cells that have been genetically modified to treat patients with either AIDS or with AIDS-related lymphoma
  • • Use of neural stem cells to deliver drugs directly to cancers hiding in the brain and elsewhere
  • • T cell immunotherapy trials to treat patients with cancer
  • • Correction of hemophilia B by genetic editing of liver stem cells
  • To accomplish this, the City of Hope developed a novel approach to evaluation of these new therapies. Instead of using the existing Clinical Research Unit here, a dedicated outpatient clinic was established in the City of Hope Day Hospital and staffed with clinic nurses. The reason for this is reflected in the two-fold nature of the CIRM network of Alpha Stem Cell Clinics’ goals: the first is to accelerate the development of new stem cells therapies and the second is the achievement of a fiscally sustainable clinical activity. As the largest stem cell transplantation center in California, the City of Hope plan takes advantage of our clinical nursing expertise of the Day Hospital and of the business expertise that makes this out-patient transplant center sustainable.
  • Thus, the COH Alpha Clinic is an experiment in itself, testing whether this hybrid research unit is the best approach to introduction of new treatments to the clinic. CIRM funding has made it possible to bring the clinical staff together with the research staff in this way to accelerate development of stem cell research.
Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies III
Grant Number: 
RT3-07692
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 416 600
Disease Focus: 
Blood Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 

Tens of thousands of patients need bone marrow transplants (BMT) every year, some for bone marrow (BM) cancers and some for inherited diseases such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, but many lack a BM donor. African Americans, Asian Americans, and people of Hispanic descent are more likely than others to lack a stem cell donor.

BMTs provide hematopoietic (blood) stem and progenitor cells (HS/PCs) that replace the patient’s diseased BM with healthy BM. The new BM provides all the circulating blood cells throughout life.

Many BMTs use HS/PCs that do not come from the BM. One such ‘other’ source is umbilical cord blood (UCB). UCB HS/PCs have many advantages over other HS/PC sources (i.e., BM or peripheral blood). For example, we can easily obtain UCB HS/PCs without any risk to the donor, and we can keep the cells stored in freezers to be available when a patient needs them. However, most UCB samples contain too few HS/PCs to be used to treat people.

Expanding the number of HS/PCs in UCB samples will increase the number of clinically usable UCB samples, offering new hope for thousands of patients who currently lack a donor. We previously screened >120,000 compounds for their ability to expand UCB HS/PCS, and identified a short list of lead candidates. This grant will fund the next step in our effort to develop a novel, clinically-useful UCB HS/PC expansion protocol. Successful completion of this proposal will result in life-saving treatment for thousands of patients.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Our proposal seeks to establish a novel method to expand umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HS/PCs) to make bone marrow transplants (BMTs) available to thousands of patients who currently lack a stem cell donor. The benefits to California are wide-ranging:
• Grow California’s skilled workforce and create jobs: This project will train scientists in stem cell research and technology, and our success will attract more talent from outside California.
• Increase innovation: This proposal is highly translational, with a goal to move rapidly from bench to bedside. However, our research will also provide basic insights into stem cell biology that can be applied by other scientists to help patients more broadly.
• Enhancing the medical treatment of California residents: Compounds that expand UBC HS/PCs have the potential to improve clinical benefit and reduce health care costs by increasing the success rate of stem-cell transplants. Given California’s diverse ethnic population, we have many patients who need a BMT yet lack a donor, so our residents will directly benefit from our success.
• Attracting venture capital and commercialization: We aim to develop technology that will be highly attractive to the biotechnology industry. We have identified GE as a partner to commercialize our reagents and processes. Furthermore, commercially viable compounds will attract venture capital to fund cell therapies and create new biotech jobs for the California economy.

Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies III
Grant Number: 
RT3-07848
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 500 624
Disease Focus: 
HIV/AIDS
Blood Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 

The overall goal of this proposal is to develop new methods and technologies to improve our ability to engineer hematopoietic stem cells. These are the adult stem cells found in the bone marrow that give rise to all of the components of the blood and immune systems. Being able to engineer these cells provides potential treatments for diseases of the blood including genetic diseases, such as sickle cell disease or severe immune deficiencies, as well as serious infections such as HIV/AIDS. We work with a new class of genetic engineering tools called targeted nucleases that have the potential to make genetic engineering of stem cells much more precise and therefore safer. In addition, we are exploring methods to deliver these reagents directly to the stem cells in the body, without the currently necessary steps of first removing the cells and performing the genetic engineering in a lab. Such capabilities would greatly improve the safety of human gene therapy, as well as facilitate its practical implementation. HIV/AIDS is our disease of focus, and we will use these techniques to develop new treatments that go beyond the current use of targeted nucleases in patients, where HIV’s co-receptor gene, called CCR5, is being disrupted. Our goal is to develop a next-generation of anti-HIV therapies and we expect that the techniques we develop will be broadly applicable to other disease of the blood and immune systems where stem cell therapies could be of benefit.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

HIV/AIDS is a major social, economic and health burden to California and its citizens. The numbers are sobering: California has 14% of all US cases of HIV, second only to New York, with 220,543 cases reported through June 2014, including 98,161 deaths. With the advent of improved antiretroviral drugs, mortality has significantly decreased, but so has the length of time people need to take the drugs, and the economic burden to the state is revealed by the cost of drugs representing 85% of all AIDS-related costs. Both federal and state laws require that the AIDS Drug Assistance Program be the payer of last resort for these medications, and its budget is underwritten by the General Fund. Beyond the fiscal concerns, patients live with the potential for developing side effects to the drugs or drug-resistant virus, and accessing these life-long drug regimens is a daily struggle for many. Consequently, the development of stem cell based therapies for HIV brings the potential of one-shot and long-lasting treatments that could arm a patient’s own immune system with the capability to suppress HIV in the absence of drugs. Such an outcome would provide economic returns over the long-run by reducing spending on drugs, as well as improving the quality of life for individuals with HIV/AIDS. Beyond HIV, the development of technologies to improve the efficiency, safety and implementation of hematopoietic stem cell therapies will benefit other diseases where such cells could be curative.

Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies III
Grant Number: 
RT3-07683
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
Institution: 
Type: 
Co-PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 452 708
Disease Focus: 
Blood Disorders
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 

A goal of stem-cell therapy is to transplant into a patient “tissue-specific” stem cells, which can regenerate a particular type of healthy tissue (e.g., heart or blood cells). A major obstacle to this goal is obtaining tissue-specific stem cells that (1) are available in sufficient numbers; and (2) will not be rejected by the recipient. One approach to these challenges is to generate tissue-specific stem cells in the lab from “pluripotent” stem cells, which can produce all types of tissue-specific stem cells. The rationale is that pluripotent stem cells that will be tolerated are easier to directly obtain than tissue-specific stem cells that will be tolerated. Furthermore, descendants of a tolerated pluripotent stem cell will also be tolerated and can be produced abundantly.

The goal of the proposed project is to develop techniques for generating transplantable blood-forming stem cells from pluripotent stem cells. In pursuit of this goal, we will study how blood-forming stem cells arise during development. We will also test new methods--less toxic than current chemotherapy and radiation--for preparing recipients for transplantation of blood-forming stem cells.

Additional benefit: Successful transplantation of blood-forming stem cells allows the recipient to tolerate other tissue or organ transplants from the same donor. Thus, transplanted blood-forming stem cells could allow people to receive organs that they may otherwise reject, without taking immune-suppressing drugs.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

We aim to generate from stem cells that can produce all tissues of the body those stem cells that specifically form blood. We will also test new methods--less toxic than current chemotherapy and radiation--for pretreatment before transplantation of blood-forming stem cells. A large number of patients in California could benefit from advances in this field, primarily those with diseases affecting the production of blood and immune cells: leukemia, lymphoma, thalassemia, certain types of anemia, immune deficiency diseases, autoimmune diseases (e.g., lupus), etc. For leukemia and lymphoma alone, in 2014 in California, there will be an estimated 12,060 newly diagnosed cases, 103,400 existing cases, and 4,620 deaths (per the California Cancer Registry). The cost of these blood cancers are difficult to estimate but they account for 6% of cancers in women and 9% in men in California, where the estimated cost of cancer per year is $28.3 billion.

The reagents generated in these studies can be patented, forming an intellectual property portfolio shared by the state. The funds generated from the licensing of these technologies will provide revenue for the state, help increase hiring of faculty and staff (many of whom will bring in other, out-of-state funds to support their research) and could reduce the costs of related clinical trials. Only California businesses are likely to be able to license these reagents and to develop them into diagnostic and therapeutic entities.

Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies III
Grant Number: 
RT3-07763
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 382 400
Disease Focus: 
Blood Disorders
Collaborative Funder: 
Australia
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 

Our goal is to develop tools that address major bottlenecks that have prevented the generation of blood forming stem cells in culture for therapeutic use. To help overcome these bottlenecks, we will generate a suite of human embryonic stem cell reporter lines that can be used to monitor key milestones in blood stem cell development. These lines will serve as tools to identify factor combinations to improve the in vitro differentiation of hESCs to functional blood stem cells. Once individual lines have been validated, lines that contain multiple fluorescent reporters will be generated, and a multi factor screen will be performed to optimize conditions that induce these blood stem cell regulators. To track the location and quantity of transplanted cells in recipient small animal model, we will generate hESC lines with in vivo reporter system that combines bioluminescent or PET imaging, and serum-based assay. Our in vivo tracking tools will be broadly relevant and not restricted to studying the in vivo biology of blood forming cells. These tools will help translate the promise of stem cells to cell based therapies to treat human disease.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

This project will help improve California economy as many of the vendors used for reagents and supplies are located in California. This project will also help create and maintain jobs for skilled personnel and helps train post-doctoral fellows who will become the next generation of stem cell scientists. The long-term goal of this project is to improve in vitro differentiation protocols to create transplantable blood forming stem cells for therapeutic use. If we, or others who will use our reporter lines generated in this study, achieve this goal, there will be new, theoretically unlimited sources of HLA-matched or patient specific blood stem cells that can be used for treating many serious blood diseases, including leukemias and inherited immunodeficiencies or anemias. Availability of patient specific blood stem cells for transplantation would be a major benefit in California, as there is currently limited availability of suitable bone marrow donors for individuals from mixed ethnic backgrounds.

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-07379
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$615 639
Disease Focus: 
Blood Disorders
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 

The research performed through this project is very important for the fields of solid organ and bone marrow transplantation because it focuses on a potential new target to increase engraftment of stem cells. Currently, patients that receive stem cell transplants from a non-identical donor must take medications to suppress their immune system; otherwise the stem cells will be rejected.

Stem cell trials have been extended to solid organ transplantation, where it has been shown that kidney transplants can be managed with little or no immunosuppressive medications when stem cells are given to the patient at the time of transplantation. In many cases though the stem cells are rejected and the patient must resume toxic medications.

Our laboratory has been very interested in understanding ways to prevent the rejection of stem cells and has focused on a phylogenetically conserved group of cellular receptors called pattern recognition receptors. This project is focused on understanding how to prevent rejection of stem cells through modifications of these receptors. We hope to identify novel targets to prevent the rejection of stem cells in order to decrease the occurrence of graft versus host disease after bone marrow transplantation and also improve the opportunities for long-term transplant survival without the use of toxic immunosuppressive medications.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

The research we will undertake will benefit the State of California and its residents in two major ways. First it promises to define a novel targets to prevent rejection of stem cells that are transplanted into their new host. This is very important because rejection of hematopoietic stem cells is a major impediment to successful efforts at both bone marrow and solid organ transplantation. Patients needed life-saving solid organ transplants and patients that receive bone marrow transplants from donors that are not perfectly matched to them reject their grafts unless they take powerful medications to suppress their immune system. This project is focused on finding a way to help prevent the rejection of these grafts without the need for immunosuppressive medications.

The second way the project will benefit the State of California is to provide new employment opportunities within the State at a large University that conducts biomedical research. This project will not only directly support the employment of three California citizens devoted to biomedical research, but the work it generates will support California-based biomedical science companies, California University personal and other local companies that employ California citizens that produce the reagents and the supplies used in the proposed studies.

Progress Report: 
  • The research performed through this project is very important for the fields of solid organ and bone marrow transplantation because it focuses on a potential new target to increase engraftment of stem cells. Currently, patients that receive stem cell transplants from a non-identical donor must take medications to suppress their immune system; otherwise the stem cells will be rejected.
  • In our first year of this project we were able to develop a reliable model to delete specific receptors which directly influence stem cell engraftment in genetically different hosts. We have also found that deletion of defined receptors greatly improves stem cell engraftment for up to 20 weeks after injection in a murine model of bone marrow transplantation.
  • The plan for the next reporting period is to continue to focus our studies on characterizing the lodging and fate of the engrafted stem cells in long-lasting chimeric animals and to look into ways to improve the opportunities for long-term transplant survival without the use of toxic immunosuppressive medications.

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