Blood Cancer

Coding Dimension ID: 
287
Coding Dimension path name: 
Cancer / Blood
Funding Type: 
Clinical Trial Stage Projects
Grant Number: 
CTS1-08289
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$8 521 441
Disease Focus: 
HIV/AIDS
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
Statement of Benefit to California: 

In California, the number of HIV infected individuals continues to increase. As anti-retroviral drugs are not curative, these individuals still have to deal with the emotional, financial, and medical consequences. Our HIV stem cell gene therapy approach comprises the transplantation of a purified population of HIV-resistant blood forming stem cells which would generate an HIV-resistant immune system in a patient’s body. This would be significantly compelling to the state of California.

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Research I
Grant Number: 
DR1-01485
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
Institution: 
Type: 
Co-PI
Institution: 
Type: 
Co-PI
Institution: 
Type: 
Partner-PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$19 999 996
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Solid Tumor
Collaborative Funder: 
UK
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Cancer Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that is rapidly fatal within months if untreated. Even with aggressive treatment, including chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation, five-year overall survival rates range between 30-40%. Evidence indicates that not all cells in this cancer are the same, and that there is a rare population of leukemia stem cells (LSC) that are responsible for maintaining the disease. Thus, in order to cure this cancer, all LSC must be eliminated, while at the same time sparing the normal blood forming stem cells in the bone marrow. We propose to develop therapeutic antibodies directed against surface markers present in much larger amounts on LSC than on the surface of normal blood forming stem cells. We recently identified and validated several such protein markers including CD47, which we determined contributes to leukemia development by blocking the ingestion and removal of leukemia cells by immune system cells called macrophages. In this way, CD47 acts as a “don’t eat me” signal on LSC. Moreover, we determined that monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against CD47, able to block its interaction with macrophages, mask the “don’t eat me” signal resulting in ingestion and elimination of leukemia in mouse pre-clinical models. We propose a combination of clinical studies, basic research, and pre-clinical development to prepare a therapeutic antibody directed against CD47 and/or other LSC-specific proteins for Initial New Drug (IND) filing with the FDA, and then a Phase I clinical trial to be conducted at {REDACTED} and in the Collaborative Funding Partner country. In collaboration with the pioneering Collaborative Funding Partner country AML Working Group, we will track expression of the LSC proteins in patient samples and correlate with clinical outcomes. This will allow us to identify particular LSC proteins that must be targeted to achieve cure, thereby prioritizing candidate therapeutic antibodies for clinical development. Concurrently, we will conduct basic research and pre-clinical development to prepare these candidates. Basic research during years 1 and 2 will focus on the characterization of anti-CD47 mAb efficacy, investigation of mAb targeting of additional LSC molecules, and determination of efficacy in combinations with anti-CD47. Pre-clinical development during years 1 and 2 will focus on blocking anti-CD47 mAbs, including antibody humanization and large animal model pharmacologic and toxicity studies. Similar studies will be conducted with the most promising antibodies resulting from our basic research. During years 3-4, we will proceed with GMP grade production of the best candidate, followed by efficacy testing in mouse models and large animal models. Finally, in year 4, we will prepare an IND filing with the FDA/MHRA and develop a Phase I clinical trial with this antibody for the treatment of AML. Ultimately, therapeutic antibodies specifically targeting AML LSC offer the possibility of less toxicity with the potential for cure.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy of the bone marrow with nearly 13,000 new diagnoses annually in the US and 2,200 in the Collaborative Funding Partner country. Current standard of care for medically fit patients consists of several cycles of high dose chemotherapy, and often includes allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Even with these aggressive treatments, which cause significant morbidity and mortality, relapse is common and the five-year overall survival is 30-40%, but
Progress Report: 
  • Our program is focused on producing new therapeutic candidates to prolong remission and potentially cure highly lethal cancers where patients have few alternative treatment options. We have selected Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) as the initial clinical indication for evaluating our novel therapeutics, but anticipate a full development program encompassing many other types of solid tumor cancers.
  • Our strategy is to develop an antibody that binds to and eliminates the cancer-forming stem cells in leukemia and other solid tumors. While current cancer treatments (e.g. surgery, chemotherapy, radiation) will frequently get rid of the bulk of the tumor, they rarely touch the tiny number of cancer stem cells that actually re-generate the masses of cancer cells that have been eliminated. When the latter occurs, the patient is described as having a relapse, leading to a disease recurrence with poor prognosis. Our strategy is to eliminate the small number of cancer-regenerating stem cells by targeting cell membrane proteins expressed by these cells.
  • We have discovered that many cancer cells coat themselves with a protein called CD47 that prevents them from being eaten and disposed of by the patient’s blood cells. In this context, CD47 can be considered a ‘don’t eat me’ signal that protects the cancer cells from being phagocytosed i.e. ‘eaten’. The antibody we are developing binds to and covers the ‘don’t eat me’ CD47 protein, so that the patient’s blood cells are now able to ‘eat’ the cancer cells by standard physiological responses, and eliminate them from the body.
  • Developing an antibody such as this for use in humans requires many steps to evaluate it is safe, while at the same ensuring it targets and eliminates the cancer forming stem cells. The antibody must also ‘look’ like a human antibody, or else the patient will ‘see’ it as a foreign protein and reject it. To achieve these criteria, we have made humanized antibodies that bind to human CD47. We have shown that the antibodies eliminate cancer cells in two ways: (i) blood cells from healthy humans rapidly “ate” and killed leukemia cells collected from separate cancer patients when the anti-human CD47 antibody was added to a mixture of both cell types in a research laboratory test tube; (ii) the anti-human CD47 antibody eliminates human leukemia cells collected from patients, then transferred into special immunodeficient mice which are unable to eliminate the human tumor cells themselves. In these experiments, the treated mice remained free of the human leukemia cells for many weeks post-treatment, and could be regarded as being cured of malignancy.
  • To show the antibodies were safe, we administered to regular mice large amounts of a comparable anti-mouse CD47 antibody on a daily basis for a period of many months. No adverse effects were noted. Unfortunately our antibody to human CD47 did not bind to mouse CD47, so it’s safety could not be evaluated directly in mice. Since the anti-human CD47 antibody does bind to non-human primate CD47, safety studies for our candidate therapeutic need to be conducted in non-human primates. These studies have been initiated and are in progress. Following administration of the anti-human CD47 antibodies, the non-human primates will be monitored for clinical blood pathology, which, as in humans, provides information about major organ function as well as blood cell function in these animals.
  • The next step after identifying an antibody with strong anti-cancer activity, but one that can be safely administered to non-human primates without causing any toxic effects, is to make large amounts of the antibody for use in humans. Any therapeutic candidate that will be administered to humans must be made according to highly regulated procedures that produce an agent that is extremely “clean”, meaning free of viruses, other infectious agents, bacterial products, and other contaminating proteins. This type of production work can only be performed in special facilities that have the equipment and experience for this type of clinical manufacturing. We have contracted such an organization to manufacture clinical grade anti-human CD47 antibodies. This organization has commenced the lengthy process of making anti-CD47 antibody that can be administered to humans with cancer. It will take another 18 months to complete the process of manufacturing clinical grade material in sufficient quantities to run a Phase I clinical trial in patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.
  • Our program is focused on producing new therapeutic candidates to prolong remission and potentially cure highly lethal cancers where patients have few alternative treatment options. Our strategy is to develop an antibody that will eliminate the cancer stem cells which are the source of the disease, and responsible for the disease recurrence that can occur months-to-years following the remission achieved with initial clinical treatment. The cancer stem cells are a small proportion of the total cancer cell burden, and they appear to be resistant to the standard treatments of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Therefore new therapeutic approaches are needed to eliminate them.
  • In year 2 of the CIRM award, we have continued to develop a clinical-grade antibody that will eliminate the cancer stem cells in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML). We have identified several antibodies that cause human leukemia cells to be eaten and destroyed by healthy human white blood cells when tested in cell culture experiments. These antibodies bind to a protein called CD47 that is present on the outer surface of human leukemia cells. The anti-CD47 antibodies can eliminate leukemia growing in mice injected with AML cells obtained from patients. We have now extensively characterized the properties of our panel of anti-CD47 antibodies, and have identified the lead candidate to progress though the process of drug development. There are several steps in this process, which takes 18-24 months to fully execute. In the last 12 months, we have focused on the following steps:
  • (i) ‘Humanization’ of the antibody: The antibody needs to be optimized so that it looks like a normal human protein that the patient’s immune system will not eliminate because it appears ‘foreign’ to them.
  • (ii) Large scale production of the antibody: To make sufficient quantities of the antibody to complete the culture and animal model experiments required to progress to clinical safety trials with patients, we have contracted with a highly experienced manufacturing facility capable of such large-scale production. We have successfully transferred our antibody to them, and they have inserted it into a proprietary expression cell that will produce large amounts of the protein. This process is managed through weekly interactions with this contract lab. They send us small amounts of the material from each step of their manufacturing process and we test it in our models to ensure the antibody they are preparing retains its anti-cancer properties throughout production.
  • (iii) Pre-clinical safety studies: The antibody must be tested extensively in animals to ensure it does not cause serious limiting damage to any of the normal healthy tissues in the recipient. We have spent much of the last 12 months performing these types of safety experiments. The antibody has been administered to both mice and non-human primates and we have evaluated their overall health status, as well as analyzing their blood cells, blood enzyme levels, and urine, for up to 28 days. We have also collected samples of their organs and tissues to evaluate for abnormalities. Thus far, these assessments have appeared normal except for the development of a mild anemia a few days after the initial antibody injection. Subsequent experiments indicate that this anemia can be managed with existing approved clinical strategies
  • (iv) Determination of optimal dose: We have used mice injected with human cancer cells from AML patients, and determined how much antibody must be injected into these mice to produce a blood level that destroys the leukemia cells. This relationship between antibody dose and anti-cancer activity in the mouse cancer model enables us to estimate the dose to administer to patients.
  • Hematologic tumors and many solid tumors are propagated by a subset of cells called cancer stem cells. These cells appear to be resistant to the standard cancer treatments of chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and therefore new therapeutic approaches are needed to eliminate them. We have developed a monoclonal antibody (anti-CD47 antibody) that recognizes and causes elimination of these cancer stem cells and other cells in the cancer, but not normal blood-forming stem cells or blood cells. Cancer stem cells regularly produce a cell surface ‘invisibility cloak’ called CD47, a ‘don’t eat me signal’ for cells of the native immune system. Anti-CD47 antibody counters the ‘cloak, allowing the patient’s natural immune system eating cells, called macrophages, to eliminate the cancer stem cells.
  • As discussed in our two-year report, we optimized our anti-CD47 antibody so that it looks like a normal human protein that the patient’s immune system will not eliminate because it appears ‘foreign’. In this third year of the grant, we initiated the pre-clinical development of this humanized antibody, and assigned the antibody the development name of Hu5F9. Our major accomplishments in the third year of our grant are as follows:
  • (i) In addition to the hematological malignancies we have studied in previous years, we have now demonstrated the Hu5F9 is effective at inhibiting the growth and spread throughout the body [metastasis] of a large panel of human solid tumors, including breast, bladder, colon, ovarian, glioblastoma [a very aggressive brain cancer], leiomyosarcoma, head & neck squamous cell carcinoma, and multiple myeloma.
  • (ii) We have performed extensive studies optimizing the production and purification of Hu5F9 to standards compatible with use in humans, including that it is sterile, free of contaminating viruses, microorganisms, and bacterial products. We will commence manufacturing of Hu5F under highly regulated sterile conditions to produce what is known as GMP material, suitable for use in humans.
  • (iii) Another step to show Hu5F9 is safe to administer to humans is to administer it to experimental animals and observe its effects. We have demonstrated that Hu5F9 is safe and well tolerated when administered to experimental animals. Notably, no major abnormalities are detected when blood levels of the drug are maintained in the potentially therapeutic range for an extended duration of time.
  • (iv) We have initiated discussions with the FDA regarding the readiness of our program for initiating clinical trials, which we anticipate to start in the first quarter of 2014. To prepare for these trials we have established a collaboration between the Stanford Cancer Institute and the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, currently our partners in this CIRM-funded program.
  • To our knowledge, CD47 is the first common target in all human cancers, one which has a known function that enables cancers to grow and spread, and one which we have successfully targeted for cancer therapy. Our studies show that Hu5F9 is a first-in-class therapeutic candidate that offers cancer treatment a totally new mechanism of enabling the patient’s immune system to remove cancer stem cells and their metastases.
  • Hematologic tumors and many solid tumors are driven by a subset of cells called cancer stem cells. These cancer stem cells must be eliminated for cures, however, they have been found to be resistant to the standard cancer treatments of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches are needed to target these abnormal stem cells. Previously, we found that cancer stem cells have developed a clever way to hide from the patient’s immune system. They display a protein called CD47 on their surface that signals to the immune system “don’t eat me”, thereby preventing their elimination. We have developed a monoclonal antibody (anti-CD47 antibody) that blocks this signal leading to elimination of these cancer stem cells, but not normal most normal cells, by the natural immune system. In our pre-clinical studies, we showed that anti-CD47 antibodies eliminates cancer cells and cancer stem cells from many different types of human cancer including: leukemia, breast cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, and others. In addition, anti-CD47 antibodies are effective at preventing and even eliminating metastases in animal models. These results indicate that anti-CD47 antibodies have great potential for the treatment of human cancer.
  • In order to develop this approach into a clinical therapeutic, we first optimized our anti-CD47 antibody so that it looks like a normal human protein that the patient’s immune system will not reject. Over the course of this grant project, we have conducted the pre-clinical development of this humanized antibody, termed Hu5F9-G4.
  • (1) Hu5F9-G4 has been manufactured according to Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) as required by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for administration to humans. The drug product was manufactured and tested to be free of contaminants and is now ready for clinical use.
  • (2) Hu5F9-G4 has undergone extensive testing to investigate potential toxic effects in humans. According to FDA regulatory guidelines, Hu5F9-G4 was tested in experimental animals where it was given in various increasing doses. In all studies, Hu5F9-G4 was well-tolerated and caused no serious side effects.
  • (3) We have developed a phase 1 first-in-human clinical trial protocol for the investigation of Hu5F9-G4 in patients with solid tumors. In addition, we have prepared all the necessary documentation and clinical operations plans necessary to execute this clinical trial.
  • (4) We have submitted the necessary information on anti-cancer activity, manufacturing, safety, and clinical trial plans to the FDA in an Investigational New Drug (IND) application. This application was approved by FDA for the clinical trial in patients with solid tumors.
  • (5) We continue to develop parallel clinical trial plans for a phase 1 study in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and anticipate submitting our regulatory filing in 2015.
  • In summary, our studies show that Hu5F9-G4 is a first-in-class therapeutic candidate that offers cancer treatment through a totally new mechanism of enabling the patient’s immune system to remove cancer stem cells and prevent their metastases.
  • Hematologic tumors and many solid tumors are driven by a subset of cells called cancer stem cells. These cancer stem cells must be eliminated for cures, however, they have been found to be resistant to the standard cancer treatments of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches are needed to target these abnormal stem cells. Previously, we found that cancer stem cells have developed a clever way to hide from the patient’s immune system. They display a protein called CD47 on their surface that signals to the immune system “don’t eat me”, thereby preventing their elimination. We have developed a monoclonal antibody (anti-CD47 antibody) that blocks this signal leading to elimination of these cancer stem cells, but not normal most normal cells, by the natural immune system. In our pre-clinical studies, we showed that anti-CD47 antibodies eliminates cancer cells and cancer stem cells from many different types of human cancer including: leukemia, breast cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, and others. In addition, anti-CD47 antibodies are effective at preventing and even eliminating metastases in animal models. These results indicate that anti-CD47 antibodies have great potential for the treatment of human cancer.
  • In order to develop this approach into a clinical therapeutic, we first optimized our anti-CD47 antibody so that it looks like a normal human protein that the patient’s immune system will not reject. Over the course of this grant project, we have conducted the pre-clinical development of this humanized antibody, termed Hu5F9-G4.
  • (1) Hu5F9-G4 has been manufactured according to Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) as required by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for administration to humans. The drug product was manufactured and tested to be free of contaminants and is now ready for clinical use.
  • (2) Hu5F9-G4 has undergone extensive testing to investigate potential toxic effects in humans. According to FDA regulatory guidelines, Hu5F9-G4 was tested in experimental animals where it was given in various increasing doses. In all studies, Hu5F9-G4 was well-tolerated and caused no serious side effects.
  • (3) Our stability studies have shown that refrigerated Hu5F9-G4 has a shelf life of at least 24 months and probably longer. This is an excellent storage life for any therapeutic.
  • (4) We have developed a phase 1 first-in-human clinical trial protocol for the investigation of Hu5F9-G4 in patients with solid tumors. In addition, we have prepared all the necessary documentation and clinical operations plans necessary to execute this clinical trial.
  • (5) We have submitted the necessary information on anti-cancer activity, manufacturing, safety, and clinical trial plans to the FDA in an Investigational New Drug (IND) application. This application was approved by FDA for the clinical trial in patients with solid tumors.
  • (6) We continue to develop parallel clinical trial plans for a phase 1 study in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and anticipate submitting our regulatory filing in 2015.
  • In summary, our studies show that Hu5F9-G4 is a first-in-class therapeutic candidate that approaches cancer treatment through a totally new mechanism of enabling the patient’s immune system to remove cancer stem cells and prevent their metastases. CIRM Grant DR1-01485 has provided us the resources to develop our new antibody to the point that it can be safely administered to human patients. Indeed we have started administering this drug to patients with advanced solid tumors that have failed all other treatments.
Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies III
Grant Number: 
RT3-07683
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
Institution: 
Type: 
Co-PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 452 708
Disease Focus: 
Blood Disorders
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 

A goal of stem-cell therapy is to transplant into a patient “tissue-specific” stem cells, which can regenerate a particular type of healthy tissue (e.g., heart or blood cells). A major obstacle to this goal is obtaining tissue-specific stem cells that (1) are available in sufficient numbers; and (2) will not be rejected by the recipient. One approach to these challenges is to generate tissue-specific stem cells in the lab from “pluripotent” stem cells, which can produce all types of tissue-specific stem cells. The rationale is that pluripotent stem cells that will be tolerated are easier to directly obtain than tissue-specific stem cells that will be tolerated. Furthermore, descendants of a tolerated pluripotent stem cell will also be tolerated and can be produced abundantly.

The goal of the proposed project is to develop techniques for generating transplantable blood-forming stem cells from pluripotent stem cells. In pursuit of this goal, we will study how blood-forming stem cells arise during development. We will also test new methods--less toxic than current chemotherapy and radiation--for preparing recipients for transplantation of blood-forming stem cells.

Additional benefit: Successful transplantation of blood-forming stem cells allows the recipient to tolerate other tissue or organ transplants from the same donor. Thus, transplanted blood-forming stem cells could allow people to receive organs that they may otherwise reject, without taking immune-suppressing drugs.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

We aim to generate from stem cells that can produce all tissues of the body those stem cells that specifically form blood. We will also test new methods--less toxic than current chemotherapy and radiation--for pretreatment before transplantation of blood-forming stem cells. A large number of patients in California could benefit from advances in this field, primarily those with diseases affecting the production of blood and immune cells: leukemia, lymphoma, thalassemia, certain types of anemia, immune deficiency diseases, autoimmune diseases (e.g., lupus), etc. For leukemia and lymphoma alone, in 2014 in California, there will be an estimated 12,060 newly diagnosed cases, 103,400 existing cases, and 4,620 deaths (per the California Cancer Registry). The cost of these blood cancers are difficult to estimate but they account for 6% of cancers in women and 9% in men in California, where the estimated cost of cancer per year is $28.3 billion.

The reagents generated in these studies can be patented, forming an intellectual property portfolio shared by the state. The funds generated from the licensing of these technologies will provide revenue for the state, help increase hiring of faculty and staff (many of whom will bring in other, out-of-state funds to support their research) and could reduce the costs of related clinical trials. Only California businesses are likely to be able to license these reagents and to develop them into diagnostic and therapeutic entities.

Funding Type: 
New Faculty Physician Scientist
Grant Number: 
RN3-06479
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 084 000
Disease Focus: 
Blood Disorders
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Directly Reprogrammed Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Directly Reprogrammed Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

The current roadblocks to hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) therapies include the rarity of matched donors for bone marrow transplant, engraftment failures, common shortages of donated blood, and the inability to expand HSCs ex vivo in large numbers. These major obstacles would cease to exist if an extensive, bankable, inexhaustible, and patient-matched supply of blood were available. The recent validation of hemogenic endothelium (blood vessel cells lining the vessel wall give rise to blood stem cells) has introduced new possibilities in hematopoietic stem cell therapy. As the phenomenon of hemogenic endothelium only occurs during embryonic development, we aim to understand the requirements for the process and to re-engineer mature human endothelium (blood vessels) into once again producing blood stem cells (HSCs). The approach of re-engineering tissue specific de-differentiation will accelerate the pace of discovery and translation to human disease. Engineering endothelium into large-scale hematopoietic factories can provide substantial numbers of pure hematopoietic stem cells for clinical use. Higher numbers of cells, and the ability to grow cells from matched donors (or the patients themselves) will increase engraftment and decrease rejection of bone marrow transplantation. In addition, the ability to program mature lineage restricted cells into more primitive versions of the same cell lineage will capitalize on cell renewal properties while minimizing malignancy risk.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Bone marrow transplantation saves the lives of millions with leukemia and other diseases including genetic or immunologic blood disorders. California has over 15 centers serving the population for bone marrow transplantation. While bone marrow transplantation can be seen as a standard to which all stem cell therapies should aspire, there still remains the difficulty of finding matched donors, complications such as graft versus host disease, and the recurrence of malignancy. While cord blood has provided another donor source of stem cells and improved engraftment, it still requires pooling from multiple donors for sufficient cell numbers to be transplanted, which may increase transplant risk. By understanding how to reprogram blood vessels (such as those in the umbilical cord) for production of blood stem cells (as it once did during human development), it could eventually be possible to bank umbilical cord vessels to provide a patient matched reproducible supply of pure blood stem cells for the entire life of the patient. Higher numbers of cells, and the ability to grow cells from matched donors (or the patients themselves) will increase engraftment and decrease rejection of bone marrow transplantation. In addition, the proposed work will introduce a new approach to engineering human cells. The ability to turn back the clock to near mature cell specific stages without going all the way back to early embryonic stem cell stages will reduce the risk of malignancy.

Progress Report: 
  • We aim to understand how blood stem cells develop from blood vessels during development. We are also interested in learning whether the blood-making program can be turned back on in blood vessel cells for blood production outside the human body. During the past year we have been able to extract and culture blood vessel cells that once had blood making capacity. We have also started experiments that will help uncover the regulation of the blood making program. In addition, we have developed tools to help the process of understanding whether iPS technology can "turn back time" in mature blood vessels and turn on the blood making program.
  • We aim to understand how blood stem cells develop from blood vessels during development. We are also interested in learning whether the blood-making program can be turned back on in blood vessel cells for bloodproduction outside the human body. During the past year we have made progress in understanding early human hematopoiesis such that we have designed new tools that may enable us to try and generate hematopoietic cells in culture. We have also gained ground in refining our screening strategy that we hope to adapt for finding new regulators of blood development that can be used for culturing hematopoietic stem cells.
Funding Type: 
Alpha Stem Cell Clinics
Grant Number: 
AC1-07659
Investigator: 
Name: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$8 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Blood Disorders
Blood Cancer
Cancer
HIV/AIDS
Solid Tumor
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 

As the largest provider of bone marrow cell transplants in California, and the second largest in the nation, our institution has great expertise and an excellent record of safety in the delivery of stem cell treatments. We now propose to create the Alpha Clinic for Cell Therapy and Innovation (ACT-I) in which new, state-of-the-art, stem cell treatments for cancer and devastating blood-related diseases will be conducted and evaluated. As these experimental therapies prove to be effective, and become routine practice, our ACT-I Program will serve as the clinical center for delivery of these treatments. ACT-I will be an integral part of our Hematologic Malignancy and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute, placing it in the center of our institutional strengths, expertise, infrastructure and investment over the next decade. To move quickly once the CIRM award is made, ACT-I can be launched within our institution’s Day Hospital, a brand new, outpatient blood stem cell transplantation center opened in late 2013 with California Department of Health approval for 24 hour a day operation. This will ensure that ACT-I will have all the clinical and regulatory expertise, trained personnel, state-of-the-art facilities and other infrastructure in place to conduct first-in-human clinical trials and to deliver future, stem cell-based therapies for cancer and blood-related diseases, including AIDS. When our new Ambulatory Treatment Center is complete in 2018, it will double our capacity for patient visits and allow for expansion of the ACT-I pipeline of new stem cell products in a state-of-the-art facility.

Beyond our campus, we operate satellite clinics covering an area that includes urban, suburban and rural sites. More than 17.7 million people live in this area, and represent some of the greatest racial and ethnic diversity seen in any part of the country. Our ACT-I is prepared to serve a significant, diverse and underserved portion of the population of California.

CLINICAL TRIALS. Our proposal has two lead clinical trials that will be the first to be tested in ACT-I. One will deliver transplants of blood stem cells that have been modified to treat patients suffering from AIDS and lymphoma. The second will use neural stem cells to deliver drugs directly to cancer cells hiding in the brain. These studies represent some of the new and exciting biomedical technologies being developed at our institution. In addition to the two lead trials, we have several additional clinical studies poised to use and be tested in this special facility for clinical trials. In summary, ACT-I is well prepared to accommodate the long list of clinical trials and begin to fulfill the promise of providing new stem cell therapies for the citizens of California.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

California’s citizens voted for the California Stem Cell Research and Cures Act to support the development of stem cell-based therapies that treat incurable diseases and relieve human suffering. To achieve this goal, we propose to establish an Alpha Clinic for Cellular Therapies and Innovation (ACT-I) as an integral part of our Hematological Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute, and serve as the clinical center for the testing and delivery of new, cutting-edge, cellular treatments for cancer and other blood-related diseases. Our institution is uniquely well-suited to serve as a national leader in the study and delivery of stem cell therapeutics because we are the largest provider of stem cell transplants in California, and the second largest in the country. According to national benchmarking data, our Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation program is the only program in the nation to have achieved survival outcomes above expectation for each of the past nine years. This program currently offers financially sustainable, research-driven clinical care for patients with cancer, HIV and other life-threatening diseases. CIRM funding will allow the ACT-I clinic to ramp up quickly, drawing upon institutionally established protocols, personnel and infrastructure to conduct first-in-human clinical trials for assessment of efficacy. As CIRM funding winds down, ACT-I will have institutional support to offer proven cellular therapeutics to patients. The lead studies at the forefront of the ACT-I pipeline of clinical trials focus on treatments for HIV-1 infection and brain tumors, two devastating and incurable conditions. These first trials are closely followed by a robust queue of other stem cell therapeutics for leukemia, lymphoma, prostate cancer, brain cancers and thalassemia.

Our long list of proposed treatments addresses diseases that have a major impact on the lives of Californians. Thalassemia is found in up to 1 in 2,200 children born in California; prostate cancer affects 211,300 men, and HIV-1 infection occurs in 111,000 of our citizens. From 2008 to 2010, 6,705 Californians were diagnosed with brain cancers, 4,580 of whom died. In considering hematological malignancies during this same period, 2,800 patients were diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma (416 died), 20,351 with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (6,241 died), 13,358 with leukemia (6,961 died), 3,900 with acute myelogenous leukemia (2,972 died), 2,129 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (648 died) and 4,198 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (1,271 died). Standard of care fails in many cases; mortality rates for patients with hematological malignancies range from 25% to 76%. Successful stem cell therapeutics hold the promise to reduce disease-related mortality while improving disease-related survival and quality of life for the citizens of California, and for those affected by these diseases worldwide.

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Development III
Grant Number: 
DR3-06965
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
Institution: 
Type: 
Co-PI
Institution: 
Type: 
Partner-PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$12 726 396
Disease Focus: 
Cancer
Solid Tumor
Blood Cancer
Collaborative Funder: 
UK
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Most normal tissues are maintained by a small number of stem cells that can both self-renew to maintain stem cell numbers, and also give rise to progenitors that make mature cells. We have shown that normal stem cells can accumulate mutations that cause progenitors to self-renew out of control, forming cancer stem cells (CSC). CSC make tumors composed of cancer cells, which are more sensitive to cancer drugs and radiation than the CSC. As a result, some CSC survive therapy, and grow and spread. We sought to find therapies that include all CSC as targets. We found that all cancers and their CSC protect themselves by expressing a ‘don’t eat me’ signal, called CD47, that prevents the innate immune system macrophages from eating and killing them. We have developed a novel therapy (anti-CD47 blocking antibody) that enables macrophages to eliminate both the CSC and the tumors they produce. This anti-CD47 antibody eliminates human cancer stem cells when patient cancers are grown in mice. At the time of funding of this proposal, we will have fulfilled FDA requirements to take this antibody into clinical trials, showing in animal models that the antibody is safe and well-tolerated, and that we can manufacture it to FDA specifications for administration to humans.

Here, we propose the initial clinical investigation of the anti-CD47 antibody with parallel first-in-human Phase 1 clinical trials in patients with either Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) or separately a diversity of solid tumors, who are no longer candidates for conventional therapies or for whom there are no further standard therapies. The primary objectives of our Phase I clinical trials are to assess the safety and tolerability of anti-CD47 antibody. The trials are designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose and optimal dosing regimen of anti-CD47 antibody given to up to 42 patients with AML and up to 70 patients with solid tumors. While patients will be clinically evaluated for halting of disease progression, such clinical responses are rare in Phase I trials due to the advanced illness and small numbers of patients, and because it is not known how to optimally administer the antibody. Subsequent progression to Phase II clinical trials will involve administration of an optimal dosing regimen to larger numbers of patients. These Phase II trials will be critical for evaluating the ability of anti-CD47 antibody to either delay disease progression or cause clinical responses, including complete remission. In addition to its use as a stand-alone therapy, anti-CD47 antibody has shown promise in preclinical cancer models in combination with approved anti-cancer therapeutics to dramatically eradicate disease. Thus, our future clinical plans include testing anti-CD47 antibody in Phase IB studies with currently approved cancer therapeutics that produce partial responses. Ultimately, we hope anti-CD47 antibody therapy will provide durable clinical responses in the absence of significant toxicity.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Cancer is a leading cause of death in the US accounting for approximately 30% of all mortalities. For the most part, the relative distribution of cancer types in California resembles that of the entire country. Current treatments for cancer include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, biological therapy, hormone therapy, or a combination of these interventions ("multimodal therapy"). These treatments target rapidly dividing cells, carcinogenic mutations, and/or tumor-specific proteins. A recent NIH report indicated that among adults, the combined 5-year relative survival rate for all cancers is approximately 68%. While this represents an improvement over the last decade or two, cancer causes significant morbidity and mortality to the general population as a whole.

New insights into the biology of cancer have provided a potential explanation for the challenge of treating cancer. An increasing number of scientific studies suggest that cancer is initiated and maintained by a small number of cancer stem cells that are relatively resistant to current treatment approaches. Cancer stem cells have the unique properties of continuous propagation, and the ability to give rise to all cell types found in that particular cancer. Such cells are proposed to persist in tumors as a distinct population, and because of their increased ability to survive existing anti-cancer therapies, they regenerate the tumor and cause relapse and metastasis. Cancer stem cells and their progeny produce a cell surface ‘invisibility cloak’ called CD47, a ‘don’t eat me signal’ for cells of the native immune system to counterbalance ‘eat me’ signals which appear during cancer development. Our anti-CD47 antibody counters the ‘cloak’, enabling the patient’s natural immune system to eliminate the cancer stem cells and cancer cells. Our preclinical data provide compelling support that anti-CD47 antibody might be a treatment strategy for many different cancer types, including breast, bladder, colon, ovarian, glioblastoma, leiomyosarcoma, squamous cell carcinoma, multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and acute myelogenous leukemia.

Development of specific therapies that target all cancer stem cells is necessary to achieve improved outcomes, especially for sufferers of metastatic disease. We hope our clinical trials proposed in this grant will indicate that anti-CD47 antibody is a safe and highly effective anti-ancer therapy that offers patients in California and throughout the world the possibility of increased survival and even complete cure.

Progress Report: 
  • We have previously developed a new therapeutic candidate, the anti-CD47 humanized antibody, Hu5F9-G4, which demonstrates potent anti-cancer activity in animal models of malignancy. The goal of CIRM DTIII Grant DR3-06965 is to conduct initial phase I clinical trials of this antibody in advanced cancer patients. We originally proposed to conduct two separate Phase I clinical trials: one in solid tumor patients with advanced malignancy (commenced in August 2014), the other in relapsed, refractory AML patients (anticipated to start in September 2015). The primary endpoints for these trials will be to assess safety and tolerability, and additional endpoints include obtaining information about the dosing regimen for subsequent clinical investigations, and initial efficacy assessments.
  • CD47 is a dominant anti-phagocytosis signal that is expressed on all types of human cancers assessed thus far. It binds to SIRPα, an inhibitory receptor on macrophages, and in so doing, blocks the ability of macrophages to engulf and eliminate cancer cells. Hu5F9-G4 blocks binding of CD47 to SIRPα, and restores the ability of macrophages to engulf or phagocytose cancer cells. In pre-clinical cancer models, treatment with Hu5F9-G4 shrunk tumors, eliminated metastases, and in some cases resulted in long-term protection from cancer recurrence. These results suggest that Hu5F9-G4 leads to elimination of cancer stem cells in addition to differentiated cancer cells.
  • We have developed Hu5F9-G4 for human clinical trials by demonstrating safety and tolerability in pre-clinical toxicology studies. These studies also indicated that we can achieve serum levels associated with potent efficacy in pre-clinical models. The regulatory agencies (FDA in the U.S., and MHRA in the U.K.) reviewed the large package of pre-clinical data describing Hu5F9-G4, and approved our requests to commence separate Phase I clinical trials in solid tumor and AML patients. The solid tumor trial commenced at Stanford in August 2014 and has been designed to assess patients in separate groups, or cohorts, treated with increasing doses of Hu5F9-G4. The trial is ongoing as primary endpoints have not been met. The acute myeloid leukemia trial has been given regulatory approval in the U.K., and will start enrolling patients in September 2015. In summary, during the last year, the Hu5F9-G4 clinical trials have made substantial progress and all milestones have been met.
Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01816-B
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
Partner-PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 607 305
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Collaborative Funder: 
Germany
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cancer Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Leukemia is the most frequent form of cancer in children and teenagers, but is also common in adults. Chemotherapy has vastly improved the outcome of leukemia over the past four decades. However, many patients still die because of recurrence of the disease and development of drug-resistance in leukemia cells.
In preliminary studies for this proposal we discovered that in most if not all leukemia subtypes, the malignant cells can switch between an “proliferation phase” and a “quiescence phase”. The “proliferation phase” is often driven by oncogenic tyrosine kinases (e. g. FLT3, JAK2, PDGFR, BCR-ABL1, SRC kinases) and is characterized by vigorous proliferation of leukemia cells. In this phase, leukemia cells not only rapidly divide, they are also highly susceptible to undergo programmed cell death and to age prematurely. In contrast, leukemia cells in “quiescence phase” divide only rarely. At the same time, however, leukemia cells in "quiescence phase" are highly drug-resistant. These cells are also called 'leukemia stem cells' because they exhibit a high degree of self-renewal capacity and hence, the ability to initiate leukemia. We discovered that the BCL6 factor is required to maintain leukemia stem cells in this well-protected safe haven. Our findings demonstrate that the "quiescence phase" is strictly dependent on BCL6, which allows them to evade cell death during chemotherapy treatment. Once chemotherapy treatment has ceased, persisting leukemia stem cells give rise to leukemia clones that reenter "proliferation phase" and hence initiate recurrence of the disease. Pharmacological inhibition of BCL6 using inhibitory peptides or blocking molecules leads to selective loss of leukemia stem cells, which can no longer persist in a "quiescence phase".
In this proposal, we test a novel therapeutic concept eradicate leukemia stem cells: We propose that dual targeting of oncogenic tyrosine kinases (“proliferation”) and BCL6 (“quiescence”) represents a powerful strategy to eradicate drug-resistant leukemia stem cells and prevent the acquisition of drug-resistance and recurrence of the disease. Targeting of BCL6-dependent leukemia stem cells may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse and may limit the duration of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in some leukemias, which is currently life-long.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Leukemia represents the most frequent malignancy in children and teenagers and is common in adults as well. Over the past four decades, the development of therapeutic options has greatly improved the prognosis of patients with leukemia reaching 5 year disease-free survival rates of ~70% for children and ~45% for adults. Despite its relatively favorable overall prognosis, leukemia remains one of the leading causes of person-years of life lost in the US (362,000 years in 2006; National Center of Health Statistics), which is attributed to the high incidence of leukemia in children.
In 2008, the California Cancer Registry expected 3,655 patients with newly diagnosed leukemia and at total of 2,185 death resulting from fatal leukemia. In addition, ~23,300 Californians lived with leukemia in 2008, which highlights that leukemia remains a frequent and life-threatening disease in the State of California despite substantial clinical progress. Here we propose the development of a fundamentally novel treatment approach for leukemia that is directed at leukemia stem cells. While current treatment approaches effectively diminish the bulk of proliferating leukemia cells, they fail to eradicate the rare leukemia stem cells, which give rise to drug-resistance and recurrence of the disease. We propose a dual targeting approach which combines targeted therapy of the leukemia-causing oncogene and the newly discovered leukemia stem cell survival factor BCL6. The power of this new therapy approach will be tested in clinical trials to be started in the State of California.

Progress Report: 
  • During the past reporting period (months 18-24 of this grant), we have made progress towards all three milestones. Major progress in Milestone 1 was made by identifying 391 compounds in 10 lead classes that will be developed further in a secondary fragment-based screen. While the goal of identifying lead class compounds with BCL6 inhibitory activity has already been met, we propose to run a secondary, fragment-based screen to refine the existing lead compounds and prioritize a small number for cell-based validation in Milestone 2. The success in Milestone 1 was based on computational modeling, HTS of 200,000 compounds and Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD).
  • For Milestone 2, we have successfully established POC analysis tools for validation of the ability of compounds to bind the BCL6 lateral groove and already produced 300 mg of BCL6-BTB domain protein needed for biochemical binding assays. Progress in Milestone 2 is based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assays. In the coming months, we will use crystallographic fragment screening using a subset of our fragment library in addition to SPR and NMR, since crystallographic fragment screens have been shown to yield complimentary hits. For Milestone 3, we have now set up a reliable method to measure disease-modifying activity of BCL6-inhibitory compounds based on a newly generated knockin BCL6 reporter mouse model, in which transcriptional activation of the endogenous BCL6 promoter drives expression of mCherry. This addresses a main caveat of these measurements was that they were strongly influenced by the copy number of lentivector integrations. The BCL6fl/+-mCherry knockin BCL6 reporter system will provide a stable platform to study BCL6-expressing leukemia cells and effects of BCL6 small molecule inhibitors on survival and proliferation on BCL6-dependent leukemia cell populations. This will be a key requirement to measure disease-modifying activity of inhibitory compounds in large-scale assays in Milestone 3. Other requirements (e.g. leukemia xenografts) are already in place. 
  • During the past two years of this grant, we have generated compounds that have the ability to block the function of BCL6. In previous work, we had identified BCL6 as a key requirement for persistence of leukemia stem cells, which are the root cause of leukemia relapse and drug-resistance in patients. Over the past six months, we have focused on validating the new compounds based on functional tests that allow us to measure the depth and durability of BCL6 blockade in cell-based assay. To this end, we designed a large-scale petri-dish system in which we measured the efficacy of 11 lead compounds and their derivatives to abrogate the ability of leukemia cells to form colonies, a capability that reflects the activity of leukemia stem cells. This assay allowed us to prioritize 4 compounds for further testing. In parallel, we developed a biological assay to verify that the compounds are actually hitting their target, i.e. BCL6, by measuring the activity of genes that are typically regualted by BCL6. These genes include tumor suppressors like p53 and Arf and we measured the ability of our compounds to re-instate p53 and Arf expression. We found that p53 and Arf were reinstated only by 2 of our 4 lead candidates, so current trouble-shooting efforts will attempt to clarify why this is the case and whether we can modify these two compounds to improve their on-target efficacy. The other two compounds will move forward in the next derivative screen, in which we perform a fragment-based, screen, i.e. test multiple derivative based on addition and removal of small structural changes (fragments). Other caveats to address in the next year will be stability (half-life) of the lead compounds, bioavailability (how much and how long the compound will be available in the blood stream) and toxicity (how much of the compound will be tolerated by mice, is there indication of damage to tissues upon long-term treatment?).The goal of these studies will be to make a strong case for IND-enabling studies, i.e. to enter a formal, government-regulated process to convert the strongest of our compound into an FDA-approved drug for potential clinical testing in patients with drug-refractory AML and ALL.
Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Development III
Grant Number: 
DR3-06924
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
Type: 
Co-PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$4 179 600
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Cancer is a leading cause of death in California. Research has found that many cancers can spread throughout the body and resist current anti-cancer therapies because of cancer stem cells, or CSC. CSC can be considered the seeds of cancer; they can resist being killed by anti-cancer drugs and can lay dormant, sometimes for long periods, before growing into active cancers at the original tumor site, or at distant sites throughout the body. Required are therapies that can kill CSC while not harming normal stem cells, which are needed for making blood and other cells that must be replenished. We have discovered a protein on the surface of CSC that is not present on normal cells of healthy adults. This protein, called ROR1, ordinarily is found only on cells during early development in the embryo. CSC have co-opted the use of ROR1 to promote their survival, proliferation, and spread throughout the body. We have developed a monoclonal antibody that is specific for ROR1 and that can inhibit these functions, which are vital for CSC. Because this antibody does not bind to normal cells, it can serve as the “magic bullet” to deliver a specific hit to CSC. We will conduct clinical trials with the antibody, first in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia to define the safety and best dose to use. Then we plan to conduct clinical trials involving patients with other types of cancer. To prepare for such clinical trials, we will use our state-of-the-art model systems to investigate the best way to eradicate CSC of other intractable leukemias and solid tumors. Finally, we will investigate the potential for using this antibody to deliver toxins selectively to CSC. This selective delivery could be very active in killing CSC without harming normal cells in the body because they lack expression of ROR1. With this antibody we can develop curative stem-cell-directed therapy for patients with any one of many different types of currently intractable cancers.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

The proposal aims to develop a novel anti-cancer-stem-cell (CSC) targeted therapy for patients with intractable malignancies. This therapy involves use of a fully humanized monoclonal antibody specific for a newly identified, CSC antigen called ROR1. This antibody was developed under the auspices of a CIRM disease team I award and is being readied for phase I clinical testing involving patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Our research has revealed that the antibody specifically reacts with CSC of other leukemias and many solid-tumor cancers, but does not bind to normal adult tissues. Moreover, it has functional activity in blocking the growth and survival of CSC, making it ideal for directing therapy intended to eradicate CSC of many different cancer types, without affecting normal adult stem cells or other normal tissues. As such, treatment could avoid the devastating physical and financial adverse effects associated with many standard anti-cancer therapies. Also, because this therapy attacks the CSC, it might prove to be a curative treatment for California patients with any one of a variety different types of currently intractable cancers.

Beyond the significant benefit to the patients and families that are dealing with cancer, this project will also strengthen the position of the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine as a leader in cancer stem cell biology, and will deliver intellectual property to the state of California that may then be licensed to pharmaceutical companies.

In summary, the benefits to the citizens of California from the CIRM disease team 3 grant are:

(1) Direct benefit to the thousands of patients with cancer
(2) Financial savings through definitive treatment that obviates costly maintenance or salvage therapies for patients with intractable cancers
(3) Potential for an anti-cancer therapy with a high therapeutic index
(4) Intellectual property of a broadly active uniquely targeted anti-CSC therapeutic agent.

Progress Report: 
  • Dormant cancer stem cells (CSC) evade therapies that target dividing cells and promote drug-resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Despite advances in molecularly targeted therapy, therapeutic resistance and relapse, driven by self-renewing CSC, remain major therapeutic challenges in common hematologic malignancies like chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). As a result of a CIRM HALT leukemia disease team grant, we were able to pre-clinically inhibit CSC survival in CLL and a broad array of other advanced malignancy models by developing a monoclonal antibody, cirmtuzumab (UC-961), which targets the Wnt5A receptor, ROR1. Cirmtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds with high-affinity to a proprietary, extracellular epitope of ROR1, which we defined as an onco-embryonic antigen. While ROR1 is not expressed on adult hematopoietic stem cells or other normal post-partum tissues, it is highly expressed on the cell-surface of CSC in CLL. Cirmtuzumab does not bind to normal adult tissues, but has unique functional activity against CSC by targeting ROR1, which acts in a niche-dependent fashion. In preclinical models, shRNA-silencing of ROR1 was shown to impair activation of phospho-AKT/CREB, increases spontaneous apoptosis, and inhibit the proliferation, migration, and metastatic potential of CSC in a manner similar to cirmtuzumab. In addition, cirmtuzumab inhibits the capacity of CSC to to propagate CLL in immune-deficient mice. Finally, cirmtuzumab induced rapid internalization of ROR1, thereby inhibiting CSC survival. Based on these unique features, we proceeded with the cirmtuzumab clinical development plan under the auspices of the CIRM disease team 3 grant.
  • Over the last year, this CIRM Disease team grant has enabled filing and FDA approval of an investigational new drug application (IND) for cirmtuzumab as well as the implementation and administration of an ongoing first-in-human Phase 1A clinical trial to assess safety and tolerability in patients with CLL who are not amenable to standard therapy. In keeping with the FDA IND-approved intra-patient dose escalation schema and related cirmtuzumab administration timeline, our team has enrolled 8 patients to the Phase lA clinical trial at UC San Diego for patients with relapsed or refractory CLL since 8/29/15. In particular, we have now completed enrollment of the first and second dose cohorts (doses: 15 mcg/kg and 30 mcg/kg for cohort 1; 60 mcg/kg, 120 mcg/kg, and 240 mcg/kg for cohort 2). There have been no observed grade 2 or higher adverse events attributed to cirmtuzumab. Two patients have now enrolled and initiated therapy in the third dose cohort (planned doses 500 mcg/kg and 1 mg/kg). While durable clinical responses have not been observed at these low doses, there has been evidence of biological activity and clinical benefit with stabilization of disease in some patients. This has prompted the development of a Phase 1B clinical trial, currently under review at our IRB and at CIRM, to allow patients that have derived some benefit from cirmtuzumab treatment to receive additional doses and to determine if longer term treatment provides for enhanced clinical benefit while retaining an excellent safety profile.
  • Correlative biomarkers include flow cytometric analyses that address disease heterogeneity and are suggestive of decreased ROR1 expression in the more recent dosing cohorts that may be used in the future to predict clinical outcome. In cohorts that demonstrate signs of sustained clinical responses, we will examine the activity of cirmtuzumab-based treatments in eradicating ROR1+ CSC by flow cytometry. Pharmacokinetic assessments are ongoing but cirmtuzumab plasma levels appear to correlate with response in the more recent higher dose cohort. In addition, we will examine the activity and anticipated therapeutic index (TI) of cirmtuzumab in relapsed/refactory CLL. If one or more of these tests meet milestones, then clinical studies of regimens with the highest apparent TI will be conducted in years 3-4. Upon completion of our program, we will deliver a cirmtuzumab-based therapeutic that will be suitable for registration and/or pivotal clinical trials and facilitate commercialization of this novel cancer stem-cell targeted therapy for Californians with cancer.
Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-06036
Investigator: 
Institution: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 244 455
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cancer Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 

Leukemias are cancers of the blood cells that result from corruption of the normal controls that regulate blood-forming stem cells. They are serious causes of illness and death, and are particularly devastating in children and the elderly. Despite substantial advances in treatment of leukemia, a significant proportion of cases are unresponsive to current therapy. Since more aggressive chemotherapy regimens provide only marginal improvements in therapeutic efficacy, we have reached a point of diminishing returns using currently available drugs. Thus, there is an urgent need for more targeted, less toxic, and more effective treatments. To this end, our studies focus on defining the defects that corrupt the normal growth controls on blood stem cells. The proposed studies build on our discovery of a key enzyme with an unexpected causative role in leukemia. We propose to further characterize its function using various proteomic approaches, and employ a cross-species comparative approach to identify additional pathways unique to cancer stem cell function. The proposed characterization of crucial growth controls that go awry in blood stem cells to cause leukemia will identify new drug targets for more effective and less toxic treatments against these devastating, life-threatening diseases.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

Leukemias are cancers of the blood cells that cause serious illness and death in children and adults. They result from corruption of the normal controls that regulate blood-forming stem cells. Despite many attempts to improve treatments with new drug combinations, this approach has reached a point of diminishing returns since intensified chemotherapies contribute only marginal improvement in outcome and are associated with increasing toxicity. The proposed characterization of crucial growth controls that go awry in blood stem cells to cause leukemia will identify new drug targets for more effective and less toxic treatments against these devastating, life-threatening diseases.

Progress Report: 
  • Leukemias are cancers of the blood cells that cause serious illness and death in children and adults. Even patients who are successfully cured of their disease often suffer from long-term deleterious health effects of their curative treatment. Thus, there is a need for more targeted, less toxic, and more effective treatments. Our studies focus on the defects and mechanisms that induce leukemia by disrupting the normal growth controls that regulate blood-forming stem cells. Using a comparative genomics approach we have identified genes that are differentially expressed in leukemia stem cells. These genes have been the focus of our studies to establish better biomarkers and treatment targets. One candidate gene codes for an enzyme with a previously unknown, non-canonical causal role in a specific genetic subtype of leukemia caused by abnormalities of the MLL oncogene. To characterize its molecular contributions, we are identifying and characterizing protein partners that may assist and interact with the enzyme in its oncogenic role. Candidate interaction partners have been identified using proteomic techniques, and are being investigated for their possible mechanistic roles in leukemia stem cell functions. Another promising candidate that we identified in the comparative gene expression approach encodes a cell surface protein that is preferentially expressed on leukemia stem cells. We have exploited this cell surface protein as a marker to isolate the rare population of cells in human leukemias with stem cell properties. This technical approach has resulted in the isolation of leukemia stem cell populations that are more highly enriched than those obtained using previous techniques. The highly enriched sub-population of leukemia stem cells has been used for comparative gene expression profiling to define a dataset of genes that are differentially expressed between highly matched populations of leukemia cells that are enriched or depleted of leukemia stem cells. Bioinformatics analysis of the dataset has further suggested specific cellular processes and transcriptional regulatory factors that distinguish human leukemia stem cells caused by abnormalities of the MLL oncogene. These newly identified factors will be studied using in vitro and in vivo assays for their specific contributions to leukemia stem cell function and leukemia pathogenesis. Continued characterization of crucial growth controls that go awry in blood stem cells to cause leukemia will identify new drug targets for more effective and less toxic treatments against these devastating, life-threatening diseases.
  • Leukemias are cancers of the blood cells that cause serious illness and death in children and adults. Even patients who are successfully cured of their disease often suffer from long-term adverse health effects of their curative treatment. Thus, there is a need for more targeted, less toxic, and more effective treatments. Our studies focus on the defects and mechanisms that induce leukemia by disrupting the normal growth controls that regulate blood-forming stem cells. Using a comparative genomics approach we have identified genes that are differentially expressed in leukemia stem cells. These genes have been the focus of our studies to establish better biomarkers and treatment targets. One candidate gene codes for an enzyme with a previously unknown, non-canonical causal role in a specific genetic subtype of leukemia induced by abnormalities of the MLL oncogene. To characterize its molecular contributions, we have identified protein partners that may assist and interact with the enzyme in its oncogenic role. Candidate partners are being investigated for their possible mechanistic roles in leukemia stem cell functions. Another promising candidate identified in our comparative gene expression approach encodes a cell surface protein that is preferentially expressed on leukemia stem cells. We have utilized this cell surface protein as a marker to isolate the rare population of cells in human leukemias with stem cell properties. This technical approach has resulted in the isolation of leukemia stem cell populations that are more highly enriched than those obtained using previous techniques. The highly enriched sub-population of leukemia stem cells has been used for comparative gene expression profiling to identify genes that are differentially expressed between highly matched populations of leukemia cells that are enriched or depleted of leukemia stem cells. Bioinformatics analysis of the dataset has identified major cell cycle differences that distinguish human leukemia stem cells induced by abnormalities of the MLL oncogene. The distinctive cell cycle characteristics of the cells have been confirmed in functional assays for their specific contributions to leukemia stem cell function and leukemia pathogenesis. These studies are the first to mechanistically link a cell surface protein with regulation of self-renewal, a key attribute of leukemia stem cells. Continued characterization of the crucial growth controllers that go awry in blood stem cells to cause leukemia will identify new drug targets for more effective and less toxic treatments against these devastating, life-threatening diseases.
Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Planning I
Grant Number: 
DR2-05327
Investigator: 
Type: 
PI
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$74 195
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
HIV/AIDS
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 

The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is still a major health problem. In both developed and underdeveloped nations, millions of people are infected with this virus. HIV infects cells of the immune system, becomes part of the cell’s genetic information, stays there for the rest of the life of these cells, and uses these cells as a factory to make more HIV. In this process, the immune cells get destroyed. Soon a condition called AIDS, the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome sets in where the immune system cannot fight common infections. If left untreated, death from severe infections occurs within 8 to 10 years. Although advances in treatment using small molecule drugs have extended the life span of HIV infected individuals, neither a cure for HIV infection nor a well working vaccine could be developed. Drug treatment is currently the only option to keep HIV infected individuals alive. Patients have to take a combination of drugs daily and reliably for the rest of their lives. If not taken regularly, HIV becomes resistant to the drugs and continues to destroy immune cells. What makes this situation even more complicated is the fact that many patients cannot take these drugs due to severe side effects.
Stem cell gene therapy for HIV may offer an alternative treatment. Blood forming stem cells, also called bone marrow stem cells make all blood cells of the body, including immune system cells such as T cells and macrophages that HIV destroys. If “anti-HIV genes” were inserted into the genetic information of bone marrow stem cells, these genes would be passed on to all new immune cells and make them resistant to HIV. Anti-HIV gene containing immune cells can now multiply in the presence of HIV and fight the virus. In previous and current stem cell gene therapy clinical trials for HIV, only one anti-HIV gene has been used. Our approach, however, will use a combination of three anti-HIV genes which are much more potent. They will not only prevent HIV from entering an immune cell but will also prevent HIV from mutating, since it would have to escape the anti-HIV effect of three genes, similar to triple combination anti-HIV drug therapy. To demonstrate safety and effectiveness of our treatment, we will perform a clinical trial in HIV lymphoma patients. In such patients, the destruction of the immune system by HIV led to the development of a cancer of the lymph nodes called B cell lymphoma. High dose chemotherapy together with the transplantation of the patient’s own bone marrow stem cells cures B cell lymphoma. We will insert anti-HIV genes in the patient’s bone marrow stem cells and then transplant these gene containing cells into the HIV infected lymphoma patient. The gene containing bone marrow stem cells will produce a new immune system and newly arising immune cells will be resistant to HIV. In this case, we have not only cured the patient's cancer but have also given the patient an HIV resistant immune system which will be able to fight HIV.

Statement of Benefit to California: 

As of September 30, 2010, over 198,883 cumulative HIV/AIDS cases were reported in California. Another 40,000 un-named cases of HIV were also reported before 2006 although some of them may be duplicates of the named HIV cases. Patients living with HIV/AIDS totaled 108,986 at the end of September 2010. These numbers continue to grow since new cases of HIV and AIDS are being reported on a daily basis and patients now live much longer. In fact, after New York, California has the second highest number of HIV cases in the nation. Although the current and improved anti-retroviral small molecule drugs have prolonged the life of these patients, they still have to deal with the emotional, financial, and medical consequences of this disease. The fear of side effects and the potential generation of drug resistant strains of HIV is a constant struggle that these patients have to live with for the rest of their lives. Furthermore, not every patient with HIV responds to treatment and not every complication of HIV dissipates upon starting a drug regimen. In fact, the risk of some AIDS-related cancers still remains high despite the ongoing drug therapy. Additionally, in the current economic crisis, the financial burden of the long term treatment of these patients on California taxpayers is even more obvious. In 2006, the lifetime cost of taking care of an HIV patient was calculated to be about $618,900. Most of this was related to the medication cost. With the introduction of new HIV medications that have a substantially higher price and with the increase in the survival of HIV/AIDS patients, the cost of taking care of these patients can be estimated to be very high.
The proposed budget cuts and projected shortfall in the California AIDS assistant programs such as ADAP will make the situation worse and could result in catastrophic consequences for patients who desperately need this of kind of support. Consequently, improved therapeutic approaches and the focus on developing a cure for HIV infected patients are issues of great importance to the people of California.
Our proposed anti-HIV stem cell gene therapy strategy comprises the modification of autologous hematopoietic blood forming stem cells with a triple combination of potent anti-HIV genes delivered by a single lentiviral vector construct. This approach would engineer a patient’s immune cells in a way to make them completely resistant to HIV infection. By transplanting these anti-HIV gene expressing stem cells back into an HIV infected patient, the ability of HIV to further replicate and ravage the patient’s immune system would be diminished. The prospect of such a stem cell based therapy which may require only a single treatment to cure an HIV infected patient and which would last for the life of the individual would be especially compelling to the HIV community and the people of California.

Progress Report: 
  • HIV is still a major health problem. In both developed and underdeveloped nations, millions of people are infected with this virus. If left untreated, death from severe infections occurs within 8 to 10 years. Although advances in treatment using small molecule drugs have extended the life span of HIV infected individuals, neither a cure for HIV infection nor a well working vaccine could be developed. Drug treatment is currently the only option to keep HIV infected individuals alive. Patients have to take a combination of drugs daily and reliably for the rest of their lives. If not taken regularly, HIV becomes active again and may even become resistant to the drugs and continues to destroy immune cells. What makes this situation even more complicated is the fact that many patients cannot take these drugs due to severe side effects. Stem cell gene therapy for HIV may offer an alternative treatment. If “anti-HIV genes” were inserted into the genetic information of bone marrow stem cells, these genes would be passed on to all new immune cells and make them resistant to HIV. Anti-HIV gene containing immune cells can now multiply in the presence of HIV and fight the virus. In our approach, we are planning to use a combination of three anti-HIV genes which are much more potent. They will not only prevent HIV from entering an immune cell but will also prevent HIV from mutating, since it would have to escape the anti-HIV effect of three genes, similar to triple combination anti-HIV drug therapy. To demonstrate safety and effectiveness of our treatment, we have proposed a clinical trial in HIV lymphoma patients with stem cell gene therapy incorporated into their routine treatment with high dose chemotherapy together with the transplantation. The fund provided by CIRM (California Institute for Regenerative Medicine) gave us the opportunity to put together a panel of experts within the University of California at Davis and another panel of international experts in the area of gene therapy (an external advisory board). Intense discussion in multiple meeting with members of these two panels as well as many other meetings with individual researches within our institution resulted in the design of a clinical trial for treating patients with HIV disease using our gene therapy approach. It further helped us to identify the necessary means needed to support such a regulatory intensive gene therapy trial. To be able to recruit enough patients for such a trial, we used the funds from this planning grant for several presentations to our colleagues in other institutions for a multi-institutional clinical trial approach. The funds provided to us through this grant helped to calculate the budget required to 1) finish our application with Federal Drug Administration (FDA) to obtain the appropriate license for starting such a trial and 2) to manufacture the target drug and 3) to run the actual clinical trial. Finally, with the help of this grant, we have put together a CIRM disease grant proposal and have applied for necessary funds based on the above calculation.
  • The original progress report was submitted to the CIRM on March 1st 2012. The no cost extension was requested to perform the necessary work related to further development of our clinical trial before submission to RAC. During this period, in multiple meetings we rewrote our clinical trial based on the comments of our external advisory board and other consultants. We submitted our clinical trial protocol and Appendix M to RAC committee and after receiving their preliminary comments, we formulated our response. As the last step, we presented our clinical trial to the members of RAC committee and received a unanimous approval to move forward with the IND application to FDA.

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