Training

Cells derived from embryonic stem cells, iPS cells appear immature

A trend over the past few years has been comparing embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells and reprogrammed adult cells (also known as iPS cells) to each other and to other cell types. The goal is to understand what the cells are, exactly, and and how they differ from each other. Eventually this information could help researchers learn which type of cell will be most effective for developing therapies, understanding diseases or drug screening.

Tissue engineering produces small intestine, possible help for pre-term infants

CIRM grantees at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and the University of Southern California have succeeded in growing normal-looking small intestines in mice.

In a press release, the senior author Tracy Grikscheit said:

Gene replacement in stem cells made easier

A press release about CIRM grantees at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies contains what might be the truest words in stem cell science:

How a stem cell forms a neuron

CIRM grantees at Sanford-Burnham have published another paper using an embryonic stem cell model to understand one of the earliest steps in human nervous system development. (We've blogged about their work before here.)

Genes at the heart of heart deformities found through stem cell studies

CIRM grantees at The Gladstone Institutes have, over the past few years, been hard at work learning about the origins of heart deformities by studying how stem cells mature into heart tissue.

From stem cells to schizophrenia in a dish

Kristen Bren

Protein Linked to Normal Prostate Stem Cells and to Cancer

When I was the editor of a national magazine for physicians, I told my writers to do any story they found on prostate issues, with our overwhelming male audience then, I knew those stories would get high readership scores. My readers back then would have loved today's news out of UCLA. The team there, led by CIRM grantee Owen Witte, found that the inhibition of a certain protein slowed the growth of an aggressive form of prostate cancer in animal models.

Resting stem cells are cancer-prone

CIRM grantees at University of California, San Francisco, have published a Cell Stem Cell paper explaining why blood-forming stem cells accumulate cancer-causing mutations with age. Basically, they found that inactivity is genetically risky for the cells.

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