Creating New Stem Cell Lines

15 registered stem cell lines and counting

Guest blogger Geoff Lomax
Senior Officer to the Standards Working Group

NIH accepts new human embryonic stem cell lines

By Geoff Lomax

The NIH has accepted three new human embryonic stem cell lines, created by CIRM grantee Amander Clark at UCLA. According to the UCLA press release:

New Stem Cell Lines Created from Testes Biopsy

Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine have created new stem cell lines from cells found in the human testes. Like embryonic stem cells, these cell lines are pluripotent, which means that they can form all cell types in the adult body. The work follows similar research finding that adult stem cells in mouse testes can be reprogrammed into pluripotent cells. However, the researchers found that the cells differed from embryonic stem cells in several important ways.

New Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Avoid Animal Products

Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine derived new human embryonic stem cell lines using minimal animal products. Although numerous groups have derived stem cell lines, most were generated in the presence of animal serum and animal-derived feeder cells. These animal products are a concern because they may cause the stem cells to produce an immune response when transplanted into humans and may induce biological changes especially to the genome.

Validation of Technique Inducing Skin Cells to become Pluripotent Stem Cells

Researchers at UC, Los Angeles succeeded in inducing skin cells to become pluripotent cells with genetic featured very much like embryonic stem cells. They verified work published during the completion of their project, which showed that the introduction of four specific genetic factors is sufficient to induce differentiated adult cells into reverting to an embryonic stem cell-like state. This was critical validation of a procedure that could lead to a new way of developing personalized cell lines for therapy.

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