Vision Loss

Coding Dimension ID: 
325
Coding Dimension path name: 
Vision Loss

Generation of fibroblast cell lines in patients with common blinding eye diseases

Funding Type: 
Tissue Collection for Disease Modeling
Grant Number: 
IT1-06601
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 034 452
Disease Focus: 
Vision Loss
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) are the major causes of irreversible vision loss worldwide. Although the exact causes and mechanisms of these diseases are not completely understood, it is known that genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development of these diseases. Recent scientific advances have enabled the reprogramming of already-differentiated tissues such as skin cells back to cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs have the potential to be programmed into different cells in the eye, which are lost in degeneration. We therefore propose to obtain skin biopsies from patients with the above mentioned eye disease. The goals are to provide samples from a well-characterized patient population whose members exhibit the target eye diseases. Although there are animal models of eye diseases, retinal cells derived from iPSC will provide a better and faster way for disease modeling in the dish, novel tools for drug screening. The iPSC-derived retinal cells can also be used to replace degenerated or damaged retinal cells to restore vision for millions of patients, such as retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells to treat AMD and retinal ganglion cells to treat glaucoma.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Blindness or impaired vision affects 3.3 million Americans ages 40 and over, or one in 28, according to a study sponsored by NIH. This figure is projected to reach 5.5 million by the year 2020. The rate of low vision and blindness increases significantly with age, particularly in people over age 65. California has the largest population in the United States. With the aging of the population, the number of Californians with age-related eye diseases is increasing, and vision loss is expected to remain a major public health and societal economic concern in addition to its substantial effect on individual living quality. Our proposed study of tissue collection from patients with major eye diseases will provide new means and materials to understand mechanisms of susceptibility to ocular diseases. It is innovative and promises a number of unique contributions to the field of regenerative medicine. By integration of clinical and genome-wide association datasets, we will be able to perform a comprehensive and coordinated study designed to identify and understand the complex interplay of genetic, developmental and environmental factors, and their contributions to the development and progression of major eye disorders. This should open a new avenue for future functional studies and could eventually help facilitate the prediction, development of improved treatment, and prevention of devastating blindness-causing diseases.

Development of Cellular Therapies for Retinal Disease

Funding Type: 
Research Leadership 2
Grant Number: 
LA1_C2-02086
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$4 880 116
Disease Focus: 
Vision Loss
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
The long term goal of our research program is regeneration of the diseased eye. Age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa are leading causes of blindness for which there are no effective treatments for the majority of cases. Loss of vision is due to progressive degeneration of the photoreceptor cells, or loss of cells that support the photoreceptors, such as retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells or cells in the retinal blood vessels. The RPE is a pigmented cell layer that lies just behind the retinal and is necessary for photoreceptor survival. One possible strategy for treatment of these blinding diseases is to replace cells that are lost via transplantation. My work explores this approach, with the object of first identifying and characterizing sources of cells, determining the optimal parameters for transplantation, and investigating molecular, cellular and behavioral events that occur upon transplantation in animal models of retinal degeneration. In the case of age-related macular degeneration, there is a solid body of evidence that RPE cell loss is often an early event in disease progression. We have shown that RPE can be derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), and they can rescue vision in rodent and pig models of retinal dystrophy. We have joined forces with interdisciplinary teams in the UK and California to transition this work to the clinic, using RPE derived from hESC. We will also investigate other forms of RPE-based eye disease by generating iPSC from patients, differentiating them to RPE, and analyzing function. Small molecules that are candidate drugs will then be screened for functional rescue. In the case of diabetic retinopathy, we are investigating a strategy to used hESC-derived cells to repair blood vessels. Finally, in retinitis pigmentosa, we will pursue a possible route to replace photoreceptors by converting the surviving retinal ganglion cells into light sensing cells. The aim of the proposed studies is to provide foundational knowledge that will enable and guide further translation of cellular therapies to improve vision in patients.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and diabetic retinopathy are leading causes of vision loss and blindness. Because California is the most populous state in the nation, and because the elderly constitute a greater percentage of its population, it is estimated that over 450,000 of Californians will suffer from AMD with severe vision impairment by 2020, leading to huge costs. Diabetes continues to be a major health concern, with vision loss a common outcome. Moreover, the devastating consequences of vision deficits include the progressive loss of independence and productivity, and increased risks of falls, fractures, and depression among diseased population. So this is not only a problem of the individual quality of life, but also an issue of increasing public health burden and concern. Clearly, there is a need for better treatments. In these diseases, loss of vision is due to progressive degeneration of the light sensitive photoreceptor cells of the eye or defects in the supporting cells of the eye, including the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). There is now a solid body of evidence that suggests that RPE degeneration is the first step in AMD. There is no cure for these conditions at present, although studies of model experimental animals, mostly rats and mice, suggest several possible routes to therapy. One of these involves the transplantation of cells to slow the degeneration of photoreceptors by replacing key support cells lost during degeneration. My work explores this approach with the object of first identifying and characterizing sources of ocular cells, determining the optimal parameters for transplantation, and identifying molecular and cellular and behavioral events that occur upon transplantation in animal models of retinal degeneration. One source of cells for transplantation is ocular cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). We have shown that ocular cells, especially RPE, can be derived from both hESC and iPSC, and they can rescue visual function in rodent models of retinal dystrophy. We have shown that RPE can be derived from both hESC and iPSC, and they can rescue visual function in rodent models of retinal dystrophy. We have teamed up with an interdisciplinary disease team of stem cell biologists, materials chemists, neuroscientists, and retinal surgeons to transition this work towards clinical application for AMD, using hESC to produce RPE. Other research aims are to generate specific blood vessel cells from stem cells to replenish the retinal blood vessels in diabetic retinopathy, to generate new photosensitive cells to restore vision, and to use iPSC derived from patients to understand retinal disease and identify novel treatments. California patients with vision loss will benefit greatly from the studies proposed.
Progress Report: 
  • The goal for the first year was to establish a totally new laboratory from the ground up at the recently opened new UC Santa Barbara Center for Stem Cell Biology and Engineering funded by CIRM. This involved equipping the whole laboratory from small to large equipment items. This was made possible by the recruitment of three excellent scientists: a senior scientist, a research technician and a PhD student. This enabled the laboratory to quickly get established and running some initial experiments to ensure processes were working. We have run a number of preliminary experiments the results of which will be presented at conference later this year. The goal of the initial experiments was to establish techniques to improve cell transplantation for eye diseases.

Therapeutic potential of Retinal Pigment Epithelial cell lines derived from hES cells for retinal degeneration.

Funding Type: 
SEED Grant
Grant Number: 
RS1-00222
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$684 322
Disease Focus: 
Aging
Vision Loss
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Retinal degeneration represents a group of blinding diseases that are increasingly impacting the health and well being of Californians. It is estimated that by 2020, over 450,000 Californians will suffer from vision loss or blindness due to the age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of retinal degeneration diseases in the elderly. Furthermore, retinitis pigmentosa is the leading cause of inherited blindness in younger people. Currently there are no cures for these diseases. A layer of cells at the back of the eye called the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), provide support, protection, and nutrition to the light sensitive retina, and cooperate with other retinal cells to maintain normal visual function. The dysfunction and/or loss of these RPE cells play a critical role in the development of the previously described blinding diseases. We suggest that effective treatment of retinal degeneration could be achieved by the proper replacement of damaged RPE and retinal cells with healthy ones. However, lack of the reasonable supply of healthy human eye cells hampers the application of this therapeutic approach. Recent advances in knowledge and technology of embryonic stem cells brings new hope for the development of cell replacement treatment. Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of unlimited self-replication and production of different cell types. RPE cells derived from human ES cells (hES-RPE) are a potentially unlimited resource for the cell replacement approach. We hypothesize that the dysfunction and/or loss of RPE can be replenished and restored through the transplantation of functionally polarized RPE monolayers derived from human embryonic stem cells, and this transplantation can cure the retinal degeneration diseases caused by RPE dysfunction.We propose to: 1. Derive RPE cells from human ES cells; 2. Establish and characterize the functionally mature or polarized monolayer of hES-RPE cells that will be suitable for transplantation; 3. Rescue the retinal degeneration phenotype through the transplantation of functionally mature or polarized monolayer of hES-RPE cells in animal models. Our goal is to determine the feasibility of treating the retinal degeneration diseases caused by RPE dysfunction through the transplantation of a monolayer of polarized hES-RPE cell sheet. The knowledge and technology from our research can be used to develop new treatments for human retinal degeneration diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe vision loss or blindness among the elderly, and currently no cure for this disorder exists. Based on the fact that California is the most populated state, and that the population continues to age, it is estimated that over 450,000 of Californians will suffer from AMD with severe vision impairment by 2020. Studies have shown that the devastating consequences of AMD include the progressive loss of independence and productivity, and increased risks of falls, fractures, and depression among diseased population. So this is not only a problem of the individual quality of life, but also an issue of increasing public health burden and concern. In this study we will test the feasibility of treating AMD and other retinal degenerative diseases through the transplantation of human embryonic stem cells that have been treated to differentiate into retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE); the cells known to primarily degenerate or die in AMD. If our experimentation with RPE replacement therapy is successful in animal models, the knowledge and techniques can be quickly used to develop novel treatments for human diseases. Hundreds of thousands of Californians with AMD and other retinal degeneration diseases could benefit from our research for better quality of life with reduced morbidity. The California economy may significantly benefit from this work through potential reduced costs for health care, social welfare, and the loss of labor force.
Progress Report: 
  • It is estimated that by 2020, over 450,000 Californians will suffer from vision loss or blindness due to the age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of retinal degeneration in the elderly. A layer of cells at the back of the eye called the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), provides support, protection, and nutrition to the light sensitive retina, and cooperates with other retinal cells to maintain normal visual function. The dysfunction and/or loss of these RPE cells play a critical role in the development of dry AMD, the most common form of that disease. RPE cells derived from human ES cells (hES-RPE) are a potentially unlimited resource for cell replacement therapy.
  • During this grant period we were able to develop methods to reproducibly derive RPE cells from established human ES (hES) cell lines.
  • Normal RPE cells have a polarized appearance, meaning that they have specialized appearances and functions on the top (retinal facing) and bottom of the cells. We were then able to induce the hES-derived RPE to develop a polarized appearance very similar to that found in the normal eye. These cells had specialized characteristics that were remarkable similar to normal RPE and showed ability to function like normal RPE cells. We then developed sheets of hES-derived RPE on substrates that could be used for surgical implantation into animal eyes.
  • We then performed studies to establish appropriate animal models in which to test the ability of hES-derived RPE to prevent or slow retinal degeneration in animal models that have some features of human AMD. We were not able to use standard mouse models of AMD because mouse eyes are too small to perform the surgical implantation of polarized RPE. We first looked at a rabbit model of RPE degeneration induced by a toxin (sodium iodate). We were able to establish reproducible RPE degeneration in these animals but whenever we tried to implant hES-derived RPE under the retinas of these animals, the RPE cells did not survive. We believe that the toxin that was used to induce this model was being taken up by the transplanted cells resulting in their death. We then tested a genetic model of retinal degeneration in rats (RCS rat). We were able to demonstrate reproducible retinal degeneration in these animals. When we transplanted hES-derived RPE under the retinas of these animals, we were able to show that the RPE were indeed human in origin and that they were able to survive for at least several weeks after transplantation. Importantly, we were able to show that in the areas where hES-derived RPE were transplanted, there was less retinal degeneration than in the areas in which there was no transplantation or "sham" transplantation.
  • Thus, in conclusion, we were able to show (1) the reproducible culture of RPE cells from human ES cell lines, (2) that these hES-derived RPE had the appearance and functional characterisitics of human RPE and could be grown on substrates as sheets or polarized cells, and (3) that when these sheets of polarized hES-derived RPE were implanted under the retinal of rats with retinal degeneration, that they were able to survive and showed the ability to slow the progression of retinal degeneration in these animals.
  • The results of this study suggest that hES cells may be an unlimited source of RPE cells suitable for transplantation into eyes with retinal degeneration and that subretinal implantation of polarized hES-derived RPE may represent a novel therapy for dry AMD.

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