Parkinson's Disease

Coding Dimension ID: 
313
Coding Dimension path name: 
Neurological Disorders / Parkinson's Disease

Site-specific integration of Lmx1a, FoxA2, & Otx2 to optimize dopaminergic differentiation

Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies II
Grant Number: 
RT2-01880
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 619 627
Disease Focus: 
Parkinson's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
The objective of this study is to develop a new, optimized technology to obtain a homogenous population of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons in a culture dish through neuronal differentiation. Dopaminergic neurons of the midbrain are the main source of dopamine in the mammalian central nervous system. Their loss is associated with one of the most prominent human neurological disorders, Parkinson's disease (PD). There is no cure for PD, or good long-term therapeutics without deleterious side effects. Therefore, there is a great need for novel drugs and therapies to halt or reverse the disease. Recent groundbreaking discoveries allow us to use adult human skin cells, transduce them with specific genes, and generate cells that exhibit virtually all characteristics of embryonic stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). These cell lines, when derived from PD patient skin cells, can be used as an experimental pre-clinical model to study disease mechanisms unique to PD. These cells will not only serve as an ‘authentic’ model for PD when further differentiated into the specific dopaminergic neurons, but that these cells are actually pathologically affected with PD. All of the current protocols for directed neuronal differentiation from iPSCs are lengthy and suboptimal in terms of efficiency and reproducibility of defined cell populations. This hinders the ability to establish a robust model in-a-dish for the disease of interest, in our case PD-related neurodegeneration. We will use a new, efficient gene integration technology to induce expression of midbrain specific transcription factors in iPSC lines derived from a patient with PD and a sibling control. Forced expression of these midbrain transcription factors will direct iPSCs to differentiate into DA neurons in cell culture. We aim at achieving higher efficiency and reproducibility in generating a homogenous population of midbrain DA neurons, which will lay the foundation for successfully modeling PD and improving hit rates of future drug screening approaches. Our study could also set a milestone towards the establishment of efficient, stable, and reproducible neuronal differentiation using a technology that has proven to be safe and is therefore suitable for cell replacement therapies in human. The absence of cellular models of Parkinson’s disease represents a major bottleneck in the scientific field of Parkinson’s disease, which, if solved, would be instantly translated into a wide range of clinical applications, including drug discovery. This is an essential avenue if we want to offer our patients a new therapeutic approach that can give them a near normal life after being diagnosed with this progressively disabling disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The proposed research could lead to a robust model in-a-dish for Parkinson’s disease (PD)-related neurodegeneration. This outcome would deliver a variety of benefits to the state of California. First, there would be a profound personal impact on patients and their families if the current inevitable decline of PD patients could be halted or reversed. This would bring great happiness and satisfaction to the tens of thousands of Californians affected directly or indirectly by PD. Progress toward a cure for PD is also likely to accelerate the development of treatments for other degenerative disorders. The technology for PD modeling in-a-dish could be applied to other cell types such as cardiomyocytes (for heart diseases) and beta-cells (for diabetes). The impact would likely stimulate medical progress on a variety of conditions in which stem cell based drug screening and therapy could be beneficial. An effective drug and therapy for PD would also bring economic benefits to the state. Currently, there is a huge burden of costs associated with the care of patients with long-term degenerative disorders like PD, which afflict tens of thousands of patients statewide. If the clinical condition of these patients could be improved, the cost of maintenance would be reduced, saving billions in medical costs. Many of these patients would be more able to contribute to the workforce and pay taxes. Another benefit is the effect of novel, cutting-edge technologies developed in California on the business economy of the state. Such technologies can have a profound effect on the competitiveness of California through the formation of new manufacturing and health care delivery facilities that would employ California citizens and bring new sources of revenue to the state. Therefore, this project has the potential to bring health and economic benefits to California that is highly desirable for the state.
Progress Report: 
  • Dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the midbrain are the main source of dopamine in the mammalian central nervous system. Their loss is associated with a prominent human neurological disorder, Parkinson's disease (PD). There is no cure for PD, nor are there any good long-term therapeutics without deleterious side effects. Therefore, there is a great need for novel therapies to halt or reverse the disease. The objective of this study is to develop a new technology to obtain a purer, more abundant population of midbrain DA neurons in a culture dish. Such cells would be useful for disease modeling, drug screening, and development of cell therapies.
  • Recent discoveries allow us to use adult human skin cells, introduce specific genes into them, and generate cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), that exhibit the characteristics of embryonic stem cells. These iPSC, when derived from PD patient skin cells, can be used as an experimental model to study disease mechanisms that are unique to PD. When differentiated into DA neurons, and these cells are actually pathologically affected with PD.
  • The current methods for directed DA neuronal differentiation from iPSC are inadequate in terms of efficiency and reproducibility. This situation hinders the ability to establish a robust model for PD-related neurodegeneration. In this study, we use a new, efficient gene integration technology to induce expression of midbrain-specific genes in iPSC lines derived from a patient with PD and a normal sibling. Forced expression of these midbrain transcription factor genes directs iPSC to differentiate into DA neurons in cell culture. A purer population of midbrain DA neurons may lay the foundation for successfully modeling PD and improving hit rates in drug screening approaches.
  • The milestones for the first year of the project were to establish PD-specific iPSC lines that contain genomic “docking” sites, termed “attP” sites. In year 2, these iPSC/attP cell lines will be used to insert midbrain-specific transcription factors with high efficiency, mediated by enzymes called integrases. We previously established an improved, high-efficiency, site-specific DNA integration technology in mice. This technology combines the integrase system with newly identified, actively expressed locations in the genome and ensures efficient, uniform gene expression.
  • The PD patient-specific iPSC lines we used were PI-1754, which contains a severe mutation in the SNCA (synuclein alpha) gene, and an unaffected sibling line, PI-1761. The SNCA mutation causes dramatic clinical symptoms of PD, with early-onset progressive disease. We use a homologous recombination-based procedure to place the “docking” site, attP, at well-expressed locations in the SNCA and control iPSC lines (Aim 1.1). We also included a human embryonic stem cell line, H9, to monitor our experimental procedures. The genomic locations we chose for placement of the attP sites included a site on chromosome 22 (Chr22) and a second, backup site on chromosome 19 (Chr19). These two sites were chosen based on mouse studies, in which mouse equivalents of both locations conferred strong gene expression. In order to perform recombination, we constructed targeting vectors, each containing an attP cassette flanked by 5’ and 3’ homologous fragments corresponding to the human genomic location we want to target. For the Chr22 locus, we were able to obtain all 3 targeting constructs for the PI-1754, PI-1761 and H9 cell lines. For technical reasons, we were not able to obtain constructs for the Chr19 location Thus, we decided to focus on the Chr22 locus and move to the next step.
  • We introduced the targeting vectors into the cells and selected for positive clones by both drug selection and green fluorescent protein expression. For the H9 cells, we obtained 110 double positive clones and analyzed 98 of them. We found 8 clones that had targeted the attP site precisely to the Chr22 locus. For the PI-1761 sibling control line, we obtained 44 clones, and 1 of them had the attP site inserted at the Chr22 locus. The PI-1754 SNCA mutant line, on the other hand, grows slowly in cell culture. We are in the process of obtaining enough cells to perform the recombination experiment in that cell line.
  • In summary, we demonstrated that the experimental strategy proposed in the grant indeed worked. We were successful in obtaining iPSC lines with a “docking” site placed in a pre-selected human genomic location. These cell lines are the necessary materials that set the stage for us to fulfill the milestones of year 2.
  • Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the midbrain. These DA neurons are the main source of dopamine, an important chemical in the central nervous system. PD is a common neurological disorder, affecting 1% of those at 60 years old and 4% of those over 80. Unfortunately, there is no cure for PD, nor are there any long-term therapeutics without harmful side effects. Therefore, there is a need for new therapies to halt or reverse the disease. The goal of this study is to develop a new technology that helps us obtain a purer, more abundant population of DA neurons in a culture dish and to characterize the resulting cells. These cells will be useful for studying the disease, screening potential drugs, and developing cell therapies.
  • Due to recent discoveries, we can introduce specific genes into adult human skin cells and generate cells similar to embryonic stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). These iPSC, when derived from PD patients, can be used as an experimental model to study disease mechanisms that are unique to PD, because when differentiated into DA neurons, these cells are actually pathologically affected with PD. We are using a PD iPSC line called PI-1754 derived from a patient with a severe mutation in the SNCA gene, which encodes alpha-synuclein. The SNCA mutation causes dramatic clinical symptoms of PD, with early-onset progressive disease. For comparison we are using a normal, unaffected sibling iPSC line PI-1761. We are also using a normal human embryonic stem cell (ESC) line H9 as the gold standard for differentiation.
  • The current methods for differentiating iPSC into DA neurons are not adequate in terms of efficiency and reliability. Our hypothesis is that forced expression of certain midbrain-specific genes called transcription factors will direct iPSC to differentiate more effectively into DA neurons in cell culture. We use transcription factors called Lmx1a, Otx2, and FoxA2, abbreviated L, O, and F. In this project, we have developed a new, efficient gene integration technology that allows us rapidly to introduce and express these transcription factor genes in various combinations, in order to test whether they stimulate the differentiation of iPSC into DA neurons.
  • In the first year of the project, we began establishing iPSC and ESC lines that contained a genomic “landing pad” site for insertion of the transcription factor genes. We carefully chose a location for placement of the genes based on previous work in mouse that suggested that a site on human chromosome 22 would provide strong and constant gene expression. We initially used ordinary homologous recombination to place the landing pad into this site. By the end of year 1 of the project, this method was successful in the normal iPSC and in the ESC, but not in the more difficult-to-grow PD iPSC. To solve this problem, in year 2 we introduced a new and more powerful recombination technology, called TALENs, and were successful in placing the landing pad in the correct position in all three of the lines, including the PD iPSC.
  • We were now in a position to insert the midbrain-specific transcription factor genes with high efficiency. For this step, we developed a new genome engineering methodology called DICE, for dual integrase cassette exchange. In this technology, we use two site-specific integrase enzymes, called phiC31 and Bxb1, to catalyze precise placement of the transcription factor genes into the desired place in the genome.
  • We constructed gene cassettes carrying all pair-wise combinations of the L, O, and F transcription factors, LO, LF, and OF, and the triple combination, LOF. We successfully demonstrated the power of this technology by rapidly generating a large set of iPSC and ESC that contained all the above combinations of transcription factors, as well as lines that contained no transcription factors, as negative controls for comparison. Two examples of each type of line for the 1754 and 1761 iPSC and the H9 ESC were chosen for differentiation and functional characterization studies. Initial results from these studies have demonstrated correct differentiation of neural stem cells and expression of the introduced transcription factor genes.
  • In summary, we were successful in obtaining ESC and iPSC lines from normal and PD patient cells that carry a landing pad in a pre-selected genomic location chosen and validated for strong gene expression. These lines are valuable reagents. We then modified these lines to add DA-associated transcription factors in four combinations. All these lines are currently undergoing differentiation studies in accordance with the year two and three timelines. During year three of the project, the correlation between expression of various transcription factors and the level of DA differentiation will be established. Furthermore, functional studies with the PD versus normal lines will be carried out.
  • The objective of this project is to develop approaches and technologies that will improve neuronal differentiation of stem cells into midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. DA neurons are of central importance in the project, because they are that cells that are impaired in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Current differentiation methods typically produce low yields of DA neurons. The methods also give variable results, and cell populations contain many types of cells. These impediments have hampered the study of disease mechanisms for PD, as well as other uses for the cells, such as drug screening and cell replacement therapy. Our strategy is to develop a novel method to introduce genes into the genome at a specific place, so we can rapidly add genes that might help in the differentiation of DA neurons. The genes we would like to add are called transcription factors, which are proteins involved differentiation of stem cells into DA neurons. We have placed the genes for three transcription factors into a safe, active position on human chromosome 22 in the cell lines we are studying. These cells, called pluripotent stem cells, have the potential to differentiate into almost any type of cell. We are using embryonic stem cells in our study, as well as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), which are similar, but are derived from adult cells, rather than an embryo. We are using iPSC derived from a PD patient, as well as iPSC from a normal person, for comparison. By forced expression of these neuronal transcription factors, we may achieve more efficient and reproducible generation of DA neurons. The effects of expressing different combinations of the three transcription factors called Lmx1a, FoxA2, and Otx2 on DA neuronal differentiation will be evaluated in the context of embryonic stem cells (ESC) as the gold standard, as well as in iPSC derived from a PD patient with a severe mutation in alpha-synuclein and iPSC derived from a normal control. Comparative functional assays of the resulting DA neurons will complete the analysis.
  • To date, this project has created a novel technology for modifying the genome. The strategy developed out of the one that we originally proposed, but contains several innovations that make it more powerful and useful. The new methodology, called DICE for Dual Integrase Cassette Exchange, allowed us to generate “master” or recipient cell lines for ESC, normal iPSC, and PD iPSC. These recipient cell lines contain a “landing pad” placed into a newly-identified actively-expressed location on human chromosome 22 called H11 that permits robust expression of genes placed into it. We then generated a series of cell lines by "cassette exchange" at the H11 locus. In cassette exchange, the new genes we want to add take the place of the landing pad we originally put into the cells. Cassette exchange is a good way to introduce various genes into the same place in the chromosomes. We created cell lines expressing three neuronal transcription factors suspected to be involved in DA neuronal differentiation, in all pair-wise combinations, including lines with expression of all three factors, and negative control lines with no transcription factors added. This collection of modified human pluripotent stem cell lines is now being used to study neural differentiation. The modified ESC have undergone differentiation into DA neurons and are being evaluated for the effects of the different transcription factor combinations on DA neuronal differentiation. During the final year of the project, this differentiation analysis will be completed, and we will also analyze functional properties of the differentiated DA neurons, with special emphasis on disease-related features of the cells derived from PD iPSC.

Banking transplant ready dopaminergic neurons using a scalable process

Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01856
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$6 016 624
Disease Focus: 
Parkinson's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Collaborative Funder: 
Maryland
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating movement disorder caused by the death of dopaminergic neurons (a type of nerve cells in the central nervous system) present in the midbrain. These neurons secrete dopamine (a signaling molecule) and are a critical component of the motor circuit that ensures movements are smooth and coordinated. All current treatments attempt to overcome the loss of these neurons by either replacing the lost dopamine, or modulating other parts of the circuit to balance this loss or attempting to halt or delay the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Cell replacement therapy (that is, transplantation of dopaminergic neurons into the brain to replace lost cells and restore function) as proposed in this application attempts to use cells as small pumps of dopamine that will be secreted locally and in a regulated way, and will therefore avoid the complications of other modes of treatment. Indeed, cell therapy using fetal tissue-derived cells have been shown to be successful in multiple transplant studies. Work in the field has been limited however, partially due to the limited availability of cells for transplantation (e.g., 6-10 fetuses of 6-10 weeks post-conception are required for a single patient). We believe that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) may offer a potentially unlimited source of the right kind of cell required for cell replacement therapy. Work in our laboratories and in others has allowed us to develop a process of directing hESC differentiation into dopaminergic neurons. To move forward stem cell-based therapy development it is important to develop scale-up GMP-compatible process of generating therapeutically relevant cells (dopaminergic neurons in this case). The overall goal of this proposal is to develop a hESC-based therapeutic candidate (dopaminergic neurons) by developing enabling reagents/tools/processes that will allow us to translate our efforts into clinical use. We have used PD as a model but throughout the application have focused on generalized enabling tools. The tools, reagents and processes we will develop in this project will allow us to move towards translational therapy and establish processes that could be applied to future IND-enabling projects. In addition, the processes we will develop would be of benefit to the CIRM community.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Parkinson’s disease affects more than a million patients United States with a large fraction being present in California. California, which is the home of the Parkinson’s Institute and several Parkinson’s related foundations and patient advocacy groups, has been at the forefront of this research and a large number of California based scientists supported by these foundations and CIRM have contributed to significant breakthroughs in this field. In this application we and our collaborators in California aim propose to develop a hESC-based therapeutic candidate (dopaminergic neurons) that will allow us to move towards translational therapy and establish processes that could be applied to future IND-enabling projects for this currently non-curable disorder. We believe that this proposal includes the basic elements that are required for the translation of basic research to clinical research. We believe these experiments not only provide a blueprint for moving Parkinson’s disease towards the clinic for people suffering with the disorder but also a generalized blueprint for the development of stem cell therapy for multiple neurological disorders including motor neuron diseases and spinal cord injury. The tools and reagents that we develop will be made widely available to Californian researchers. We expect that the money expended on this research will benefit the Californian research community and the tools and reagents we develop will help accelerate the research of our colleagues in both California and worldwide.
Progress Report: 
  • Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating movement disorder caused by the death of dopaminergic neurons (a type of nerve cells in the central nervous system) present in the midbrain. These neurons secrete dopamine (a signaling molecule) and are a critical component of the motor circuit that ensures movements are smooth and coordinated.
  • All current treatments attempt to overcome the loss of these neurons by either replacing the lost dopamine, or modulating other parts of the circuit to balance this loss or attempting to halt or delay the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Cell replacement therapy (that is, transplantation of dopaminergic neurons into the brain to replace lost cells and restore function) as proposed in this application attempts to use cells as small pumps of dopamine that will be secreted locally and in a regulated way, and will therefore avoid the complications of other modes of treatment. Indeed, cell therapy using fetal tissue-derived cells have been shown to be successful in multiple transplant studies. Work in the field has been limited however, partially due to the limited availability of cells for transplantation (e.g., 6-10 fetuses of 6-10 weeks post-conception are required for a single patient).
  • We believe that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) may offer a potentially unlimited source of the right kind of cell required for cell replacement therapy. Work in our laboratories and in others has allowed us to develop a process of directing hESC differentiation into dopaminergic neurons. To move forward stem cell-based therapy development it is important to develop scale-up GMP-compatible process of generating therapeutically relevant cells (dopaminergic neurons in this case).
  • The overall goal of this proposal is to develop a hESC-based therapeutic candidate (dopaminergic neurons) by developing enabling reagents/tools/processes that will allow us to translate our efforts into clinical use. We have used PD as a model but throughout the application have focused on generalized enabling tools. The tools, reagents and processes we will develop in this project will allow us to move towards translational therapy and establish processes that could be applied to future IND-enabling projects. In addition, the processes we will develop would be of benefit to the CIRM community.
  • Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating movement disorder caused by the death of dopaminergic neurons (a type of nerve cells in the central nervous system) present in the midbrain. These neurons secrete dopamine (a signaling molecule) and are a critical component of the motor circuit that ensures movements are smooth and coordinated.
  • All current treatments attempt to overcome the loss of these neurons by either replacing the lost dopamine, or modulating other parts of the circuit to balance this loss or attempting to halt or delay the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Cell replacement therapy (that is, transplantation of dopaminergic neurons into the brain to replace lost cells and restore function) as proposed in this application attempts to use cells as small pumps of dopamine that will be secreted locally and in a regulated way, and will therefore avoid the complications of other modes of treatment. Indeed, cell therapy using fetal tissue-derived cells have been shown to be successful in multiple transplant studies. Work in the field has been limited however, partially due to the limited availability of cells for transplantation (e.g., 6-10 fetuses of 6-10 weeks post-conception are required for a single patient).
  • We believe that human pluripotent stem cells (PSC) may offer a potentially unlimited source of the right kind of cell required for cell replacement therapy. Work in our laboratories and in others has allowed us to develop a process of directing PSC differentiation into dopaminergic neurons. To move forward stem cell-based therapy development it is important to develop scale-up GMP-compatible process of generating therapeutically relevant cells (dopaminergic neurons in this case).
  • During this grant, we have optimized a step-wise scalable process for generating authentic dopaminergic neurons in defined media from human PSC, and have determined the time point at which dopaminergic neurons can be frozen, shipped, thawed and transplanted without compromising their ability to mature and provide therapeutic benefit in animal models. Our process has been successfully transferred to a GMP facility and we have manufactured multiple lots of GMP-equivalent cells using this process. Importantly, we have shown functional equivalency of the manufactured cells in appropriate models. The tools, reagents and processes we have developed in this project allow us to move towards translational therapy and establish processes that could be applied to future IND-enabling projects. In addition, the processes we have developed would be of benefit to the CIRM community.
  • CIRM Progress Report Part A: Scientific Progress
  • I. Project Overview
  • During the past three years (36 months) we have successfully completed the milestones defined in the NGA for this grant. In brief, we have selected 1 clinically compliant ESC line H14 (and a back-up line H9), which have shown reproducible, efficient differentiation to dopaminergic neurons at lab scale. We have performed in vitro and in vivo characterization as defined in the NGA and guided by our discussion with our program officer at CIRM. We have determined the time point at which dopaminergic precursors (14 days after the NSC stage) can be frozen, shipped, thawed and transplanted without compromising their ability to mature and provide therapeutic benefit in animal models. Importantly, we have evaluated efficacy of cryopreserved dopaminergic precursors manufactured by the GMP-compatible process in a rodent PD model and shown functional recovery up to 6 months post transplantation as well as survival of dopaminergic neurons.
  • In the meanwhile we have successfully transferred the process of generating transplant ready dopaminergic neurons to the manufacture facilities at City of Hope (COH). They have adapted and optimized our protocols and have established GMP-compatible protocols for the culture of ESC-NSC and for differentiating NSC to Stage 3, Day 14 DA precursors for transplantation. During this reporting period (36 month), we have tested the equivalency of these lots and confirmed that lots manufactured at COH are consistent and similar to cells produced in the laboratory.
  • Our effort resulted in two important manuscripts in Cytotherapy:
  • 1. Liu, Q., Pedersen, OZ., Peng, J., Couture, LA., Rao, MS., and Zeng, X. Optimizing dopaminergic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells for the manufacture of dopaminergic neurons for transplantation. Cytotherapy. 2013 Aug;15(8):999-1010.
  • 2. Peng, J., Liu, Q., Rao, MS., and Zeng, X. Survival and engraftment of dopaminergic neurons manufactured by a GMP-compatible process. Cytotherapy. 2014 Sep;16(9):1305-12.

Crosstalk: Inflammation in Parkinson’s disease (PD) in a humanized in vitro model

Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01778
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 472 839
Disease Focus: 
Parkinson's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Collaborative Funder: 
Germany
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder. It is characterized by motor impairment such as slowness of movements, shaking and gait disturbances. Age is the most consistent risk factor for PD, and as we have an aging population, it is of upmost importance that we find therapies to limit the social, economic and emotional burden of this disease. Most of the studies to find better drugs for PD have been done in rodents. However, many of these drugs failed when tested in PD patients. One problem is that we can only investigate the diseased neurons of the brain after the PD patients have died. We propose to use skin cells from PD patients and reprogram these into neurons and other surrounding cells in the brain called glia. This is a model to study the disease while the patient is still alive. We will investigate how the glial surrounding cells affect the survival of neurons. We will also test drugs that are protective for glial cells and neurons. Overall, this approach is advantageous because it allows for the study of pathological development of PD in a human system. The goal of this project is to identify key molecular events involved at early stages in PD and exploit these as potential points of therapeutic intervention.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The goal of this proposal is to create human cell-based models for neurodegenerative disease using transgenic human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells reprogrammed from skin samples of highly clinically characterized Parkinson’s Disease (PD) patients and age-matched controls. Given that age is the most consistent risk factor for PD, and we have an aging population, it is of utmost importance that we unravel the cellular, molecular, and genetic causes of the highly specific cell death characteristic of PD. New drugs can be developed out of these studies that will also benefit the citizens of the State of California. In addition, if our strategy can go into preclinical development, this approach would most likely be performed in a pharmaceutical company based in California.
Progress Report: 
  • In the first year of our CIRM Early Translational II Award we have largely accomplished the first two aims put forth in our proposal “Crosstalk: Inflammation in Parkinson’s disease (PD) in a humanized in vitro model.” Dr. Juergen Winkler, in Erlangen, Germany, has enrolled 10 patients and 6 controls in this project, most of which have had a biopsy of their skin cells sent to The Salk Institute in La Jolla. In Dr. Gage’s lab at The Salk Institute these patient fibroblasts are being reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and initial attempts at differentiation into dopaminergic neurons are underway. Additionally, patient blood cells have been sent from Dr. Winkler’s clinic to the lab of Dr. Glass at UC San Diego, where their gene expression profile is being determined. In this initial reporting period we are successfully building the cellular tools necessary to investigate the role of nuclear receptors and inflammation in Parkinson’s Disease.
  • In the second year of our CIRM Early Translational II Award we are making substantial progress towards completing all three aims put forth in our proposal. Dr. Juergen Winkler, our German collaborator, has completed the patient recruitment phase of this project, and skin cells from all 16 subjects (10 with PD and six controls) have been reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) at the Salk Institute in La Jolla. The patient-specific iPSCs have been differentiated into well-characterized neural stem cells, which the Gage lab is further differentiating into both dopaminergic neurons and astrocytes. In addition to collecting patient skin cells, Dr. Winkler’s group has collected blood cells which are currently being analyzed for gene expression differences by Dr. Glass’ lab at UCSD using state-of-the-art RNA sequencing technology. We have identified a compound that is anti-inflammatory in human cells that we will test on the patient-specific cells once we finish building the cellular tools required to investigate the role of nuclear receptors and inflammation in Parkinson’s Disease.
  • In the final year of our CIRM Early Translational II Award we made considerable progress towards completing all three aims put forth in our proposal. Dr. Juergen Winkler, our German collaborator, has completed the patient recruitment phase of this project, and skin cells from all 16 subjects (10 with PD and six controls) have been reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) at the Salk Institute in La Jolla. The patient-specific iPSCs have been differentiated into well-characterized neural stem cells, which the Gage lab is further differentiating into both dopaminergic neurons and astrocytes. In addition to collecting patient skin cells, Dr. Winkler’s group has collected blood cells which are currently being analyzed for gene expression differences by Dr. Glass’ lab at UCSD using state-of-the-art RNA sequencing technology. We have identified a compound that is anti-inflammatory in human cells that can reduce inflammation in patient-specific cells, and we are beginning to look at its effects on neuronal survival. This award has allowed us to build the cellular tools required to investigate the role of nuclear receptors and inflammation in Parkinson’s disease, which is a model with endless potential.

Identification and characterization of human ES-derived DA neuronal subtypes

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology I
Grant Number: 
RB1-01358
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 407 076
Disease Focus: 
Parkinson's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder that affects 1 in 100 people over the age of 60, one million people in the US and six million worldwide. Patients show a resting tremor, slowness of movement (bradykinesia), postural instability and rigidity. Parkinson's disease results primarily from the loss of neurons deep in the middle part of the brain (the midbrain), in particular neurons that produce dopamine (referred to as “dopaminergic”). There are actually two groups of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons, and only one, those in the substantia nigra (SN) are highly susceptible to degeneration in Parkinson’s patients. There is a relative sparing of the second group and these are called ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopaminergic neurons. These two groups of neurons reside in different regions of the adult ventral midbrain and importantly, they deliver dopamine to their downstream neuronal targets in different ways. SN neurons deliver dopamine in small rapid squirts, like a sprinkler, whereas VTA neurons have a tap that provides a continuous stream of dopamine. A major therapeutic strategy for Parkinsons’ patients is to produce DA neurons from human embryonic stem cells for use in transplantation therapy. However early human trials were disappointing, since a number of patients with grafts of human fetal neurons developed additional, highly undesirable motor dyskinesias. Why this occurred is not known, but one possibility is that the transplant mixture, which contained both SN and VTA DA neurons, provided too much or unregulated amounts of DA (from the VTA neurons), overloading or confusing the target region in the brain that usually receives dopamine from SN neurons in small, regular quantities. Future human trials will likely utilize DA neurons that have been made from human embryonic stem cells (hES). Since stem cells have the potential to develop into any type of cell in the body, these considerations suggest that we should devise a way to specifically produce SN neurons and not VTA neurons from stem cells for use in transplantation. However, although we can produce dopaminergic neurons from hES cells, to date the scientific community cannot distinguish SN from VTA neurons outside of their normal brain environment and therefore has no ability to produce one selectively and not the other. We do know, however, that these two populations of neurons normally form connections with different regions in the brain, and we propose to use this fact to identify molecular markers that distinguish SN from VTA neurons and to determine optimal conditions for the differentiation of hES to SN DA neurons, at the expense of VTA DA neurons. Our studies have the potential to significantly impact transplantation therapy by enabling the production of SN over VTA neurons from hES cells, and to generate hypotheses about molecules that might be useful for coaxing SN DA neurons to form appropriate connections within the transplanted brain.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The goal of our work is to further optimize our ability to turn undifferentiated human stem cells into differentiated neurons that the brain can use as replacement for neurons damaged by disease. We focus on Parkinson’s disease, a neurodegenerative disease that afflicts 4-6 million people worldwide in all geographical locations, but which is more common in rural farm communities compared to urban areas, a criteria important for California's large farming population. In Parkinson’s patients, a small, well-defined subset of neurons, the midbrain dopaminergic neurons have died, and one therapeutic strategy is to transplant healthy replacement neurons to the patient. Our work will further our understanding of the biology of these neurons in normal animals. This will allow us to refine the process of turning human embryonic stem cells onto biologically active dopaminergic neurons that can be used in transplantation therapy. Our work will be of benefit to all Parkinson's patients including afflicted Californians. Further, this project will utilize California goods and services whenever possible.
Progress Report: 
  • Parkinson's disease results primarily from the loss of neurons deep in the middle part of the brain (the midbrain), in particular neurons that produce dopamine (referred to as “dopaminergic”). In this region of the midbrain there are actually two different groups of dopaminergic (DA) neurons, and only one of them, the neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) are highly susceptible to degeneration in patients with PD. There is a relative sparing of the second group of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, called the ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopaminergic neurons. These two groups of neurons reside close to each other in the brain and both make dopamine. They are virtually indistinguishable except for one major functional difference—they release dopamine, the transmitter that is lost in Parkinson’s patients, to their downstream neuronal targets in different ways. SN neurons deliver dopamine in small rapid squirts, like a sprinkler, whereas VTA neurons have a tap that provides a continuous stream of dopamine.
  • A major therapeutic strategy for patients with PD is to make new DA neurons from human embryonic stem cells (hES). As stem cells have the potential to develop into any type of cell in the body, these considerations suggest that we should devise a way to produce SN neurons in the absence of VTA neurons from stem cells for use in transplantation. At present although we can produce dopaminergic neurons from hES cells, the scientific community cannot distinguish SN from VTA neurons in vitro due to lack of molecular markers or a bioassay, and we are therefore unable to identify culture conditions that favor the production of one over the other,
  • In addition to releasing dopamine differently, SN and VTA neurons have axons that project to different regions of the striatum. It has been shown over the last decade that specific classes of guidance cues guide axons to their particular targets. One approach we have taken has been to investigate whether differences in axon guidance receptor expression and or responses to guidance cues in vitro might provide both markers and a bioassay that will distinguish SN from VTA neurons. Over the last year we have shown that VTA and SN neurons respond differentially to Netrin-1 and express different markers associated with the guidance cue family. We now have a bioassay and markers that distinguish these two populations of neurons in vitro and in the coming year we plan to utilize this information to identify cultures conditions that favor the production of SN over VTA neurons, from hES cells.
  • Parkinson’s disease results primarily from the loss of neurons deep in the middle part of the brain (the midbrain), in particular neurons that produce dopamine (referred to as “dopaminergic”). In this region of the midbrain there are actually two different groups of dopaminergic (DA) neurons, and only one of them, the neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) are highly susceptible to degeneration in patients with PD. There is a relative sparing of the second group of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, called the ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopaminergic neurons. These two groups of neurons reside close to each other in the brain and both make dopamine. They are virtually indistinguishable except for one major functional difference—they release dopamine, the transmitter that is lost in Parkinson’s patients, to their downstream neuronal targets in different ways. SN neurons deliver dopamine in small rapid squirts, like a sprinkler, whereas VTA neurons have a tap that provides a continuous stream of dopamine. 
A major therapeutic strategy for patients with PD is to make new DA neurons from human embryonic stem cells (hES). As stem cells have the potential to develop into any type of cell in the body, these considerations suggest that we should devise a way to produce SN neurons in the absence of VTA neurons from stem cells for use in transplantation. At present although we can produce dopaminergic neurons from hES cells, the scientific community cannot distinguish SN from VTA neurons in vitro due to lack of molecular markers or a bioassay, and we are therefore unable to identify culture conditions that favor the production of one over the other, 
In addition to releasing dopamine differently, SN and VTA neurons have axons that project to different regions of the striatum. It has been shown over the last decade that specific classes of guidance cues guide axons to their particular targets. One approach we have taken has been to investigate whether differences in axon guidance receptor expression and or responses to guidance cues in vitro might provide both markers and a bioassay that will distinguish SN from VTA neurons. We showed previously that VTA and SN neurons respond differentially to Netrin-1 and express different markers associated with the guidance cue family. Also, in this year using backlabeling, laser capture and microarray analysis of SN vs VTA neurons, we have identified a number of genes expressed in on or the other population. We now have a bioassay and markers that distinguish these two populations of neurons in vitro and in the coming year we plan to utilize this information to identify cultures conditions that favor the production of SN over VTA neurons, from hES cells.
  • Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder that affects more than six million people worldwide. The main symptoms of the disease result from the loss of neurons from the midbrain that produce dopamine (referred to as "dopaminergic" or DA neurons).Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) offer an exciting opportunity to treat Parkinson’s disease by transplanting hESC-derived DA neurons to replace those that have died. There are actually two groups of midbrain DA neurons in the human brain. Those from the substantia nigra (SN) are highly susceptible to degeneration in Parkinson's patients while those from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are not. These two types of neurons have similar features but have different functions and it is important to ensure that DA neurons from hESC are the correct SN type before they are used in therapy. The primary goal of this research was to study these two neuronal types in animals and determine if the distinguishing features discovered in mice or rats can be used to more easily recognize and purify SN-type DA neurons made from hESC.
  • One of the discoveries made in this research is that SN and VTA neurons show differences in how they make connections within the brain. We have been able to identify some of the molecules that guide each neuron to connect to it appropriate target and have found that SN and VTA neurons placed in the petri dish can be distinguished from each other by their response to guidance molecules. Work in the final period of this grant has focused on testing guidance response in hESC-derived DA neurons and we have found that many of the neurons produced from hESC do show SN-like responses to guidance molecules. This discovery is being further developed as a screening tool to help guide our ongoing efforts to make increasingly pure populations of DA neurons from hESC.
  • Future human trials will likely utilize such DA neurons but since embryonic stem cells have the potential to develop into any type of cell in the body, it is important to ensure that the production methods used to make a therapeutic product for Parkinson’s disease do indeed specifically produce SN neurons. Prior to the research supported under this CIRM grant, the scientific community was not able to distinguish SN from VTA neurons outside of their normal brain environment and therefore had no ability to confirm whether a method produced one type selectively and not the other. Further refinements of the assay tools developed in our research may provide a practical means of quantifying the purity of a DA neuron preparation. This would have a significant impact transplantation therapy as well as provide useful insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie proper connectivity and function of SN and VTA DA neurons in humans.

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