Neurological Disorders

Coding Dimension ID: 
303
Coding Dimension path name: 
Neurological Disorders

Stem Cells Secreting GDNF for the Treatment of ALS

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Planning I
Grant Number: 
DR2-05320
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$89 834
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
This project aims to use a powerful combined stem cell and gene therapy approach to treat patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease). ALS is a devastating disease for which there is no treatment or cure. Progression from early muscle twitches to complete paralysis and death usually happens within 4 years. Every 90 minutes someone is diagnosed with ALS in the USA, and every 90 minutes someone dies from ALS. In California the death rate is one person every one and a half days. Stem cells have been shown to produce support cells for dying motor neurons called astrocytes which may slow down disease progression. Furthermore, many studies have shown that growth factors such as glial cell line-derived growth factor (or GDNF) can protect motor neurons from damage in a number of different animal models including those for ALS. However, delivering GDNF to the spinal cord has been almost impossible as it does not cross from the blood to the brain tissue. The idea behind the current proposal is to modify stem cells to produce GDNF and then transplant these cells into patients. A number of advances in human stem cell biology along with new surgical approaches has allowed us to put together this disease team approach – a first in man study to deliver cells modified to release a powerful growth factor that are expected to slow down the death of motor neurons and paralysis in patients. The focus of the proposal will be to perform essential preclinical studies in both small and large animals that will establish optimal doses and safe procedures for translating this stem cell and gene therapy into human patients. The Phase 1 clinical study will include 30 ALS patients from the state of California. This will be the first time this type of stem cell and gene therapy has been available to any ALS patients in the world.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
ALS is a devastating disease, and also puts a large burden on state resources through the need of full time care givers and hospital equipment. It is estimated that the cost of caring for an ALS patient in the late stage of disease while on a respiration is $200,00-300,000 per year. While primarily a humanitarian effort to avoid suffering, this project will also ease the cost of caring for ALS patients in California if ultimately successful. As the first trial in the world to combine stem cell and gene therapy it will make California a center of excellence for these types of studies. This in turn will attract scientists, clinicians, and companies interested in this area of medicine to the state of California thus increasing state revenue and state prestige in the rapidly growing field of Regenerative Medicine.
Progress Report: 
  • We completed the planning for submission of the CIRM Disease Team Grant on time. The series of meetings we had with leaders in the field of translational medicine as it relates to using stem cells secreting GDNF to treat ALS was extremely useful and allowed us to progress towards a very structured plan for both cell production, pre-clincial animal IND enabling studies and the final clinical trial involving 3 different institutions.

Molecular basis of plasma membrane characteristics reflecting stem cell fate potential

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-07254
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 003 590
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Stem cells generate mature, functional cells after proteins on the cell surface interact with cues from the environment encountered during development or after transplantation. Thus, these cell surface proteins are critical for directing transplanted stem cells to form appropriate cells to treat injury or disease. A key modification regulating cell surface proteins is glycosylation, which is the addition of sugars onto proteins and has not been well studied in neural stem cells. We focus on a major unsolved problem in the neural stem cell field: do different proteins coated with sugars on the surfaces of cells in this lineage (neuron precursors, NPs and astrocyte precursors, APs) determine what types of mature cells will form? We hypothesize key players directing cellular decisions are glycosylated proteins controlling how precursors respond to extracellular cues. We will address this hypothesis with aims investigating whether (1) glycosylation pathways predicted to affect cell surface proteins differ between NPs and APs, (2) glycosylated proteins on the surface of NPs and APs serve as instructive cues governing fate or merely mark their fate potential, and (3) glycosylation pathways regulate cell surface proteins likely to affect fate choice. By answering these questions we will better understand the formation of NPs and APs, which will improve the use of these cells to treat brain and spinal cord diseases and injuries.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The goal of this project is to determine how cell surface proteins differ between cells in the neural lineage that form two types of final, mature cells (neurons and astrocytes) in the brain and spinal cord. In the course of these studies, we will uncover specific properties of human stem cells that are used to treat neurological diseases and injuries. We expect this knowledge will improve the use of these cells in transplants by enabling more control over what type of mature cell will be formed from transplanted cells. Also, cells that specifically generate either neurons or astrocytes can be used for drug testing, which will help to predict the effects of compounds on cells in the human brain. We hope our research will greatly improve identification, isolation, and utility of specific types of human neural stem cells for treatment of human conditions. Furthermore, this project will generate new jobs for high-skilled workers and, hopefully, intellectual property that will contribute to the economic growth of California.

Paracrine and synaptic mechanisms underlying neural stem cell-mediated stroke recovery

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-07363
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 178 370
Disease Focus: 
Stroke
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Stem cell therapy holds promise for the almost million Americans yearly who suffer a stroke. Preclinical data have shown that human neural stem cells (hNSCs) aid recovery after stroke, resulting in a major effort to advance stem cell therapy to the clinic, and we are currently transitioning our hNSC product to the clinic for stroke therapy. In this proposal we will explore how these cells improve lost function. We have already shown that injected hNSCs secrete factors that promote the gross rewiring of the brain, a major component of the spontaneous recovery observed after stroke. We now intend to focus on the connections between neurons, the synapses, which are a critical part of this rewiring process. We aim to quantify the effect of hNSCs on synapse density and function, and explore whether the stem cells secrete restorative synaptogenic factors or form functional synapses with pre-existing neurons. Our pursuit is made possible by our combination of state-of-the-art imaging techniques enabling us to visualize, characterize, and quantify these tiny synaptic structures and their interaction with the hNSCs. Furthermore, by engineering the hNSCs we can identify the factors they secrete in the brain and identify those which modulate synaptic connections. Our proposed studies will provide important insight into how transplanted stem cells induce recovery after stroke, with potential applicability to other brain diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Cerebrovascular stroke is the fourth leading cause of mortality in the United States and a significant source of long-term physical and cognitive disability that has devastating consequences to patients and their families. In California alone, over 9% of adults 65 years or older have had a stroke according to a 2005 study. In the next 20 years the societal toll is projected to amount to millions of patients and 18.8 billion dollars per year in direct medical costs. To date, there is no approved therapeutic agent for the recovery phase after stroke, making the long-term care of stroke patients a tremendous socioeconomic burden that will continue to rise as our aging population increases. Our laboratory and others have demonstrated the promise of stem cell transplantation to treat stroke. We are dedicated to developing human neural stem cells (hNSCs) as a novel neuro-restorative treatment for lost motor function after stroke. The goal of our proposed work is to further understand how transplanted hNSCs improve stroke recovery, as dissecting the mechanism of action of stem cells in the stroke brain will ultimately improve the chance of clinical success. This could potentially provide significant cost savings to California, but more importantly benefit the thousands of Californians and their families who struggle with the aftermath of stroke.

Use of human iPSC-derived neurons from Huntington’s Disease patients to develop novel, disease-modifying small molecule structural corrector drug candidates targeting the unique, neurotoxic conformation of mutant huntingtin

Funding Type: 
Early Translational IV
Grant Number: 
TR4-06847
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 333 795
Disease Focus: 
Huntington's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
The long-term objective of this project is to develop a drug to treat Huntington’s disease (HD), the most common inherited neurodegenerative disorder. Characterized by involuntary movements, personality changes and dementia, HD is a devastatingly progressive disease that results in death 10–20 years after disease onset and diagnosis. No therapy presently exists for HD; therefore, this project is highly innovative and ultimately aims to deliver something transformative for the HD patient population. The specific goal of the proposed research will be to achieve preclinical proof-of-concept with a novel small molecule that binds to and ameliorates the neurotoxicity of the mutant huntingtin (mHtt) protein that causes HD. Rationale for development of such compounds comes from previous research that found that mHtt assumes a shape that is selectively toxic to neurons, and that small molecules that disrupt this shape can reduce mHtt’s toxicity in primary neurons. Critical to the proposed studies will be assays that employ human striatal neurons derived from adult and juvenile HD patients and generated with induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology. These HD i-neurons display many characteristics that are also observed in striatal neurons of HD patients, including reduced survival times. They provide the most genetically precise preclinical system available to test for both drug efficacy and safety.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The long-term objective of this project is to develop a first-in-class, disease-modifying drug to treat Huntington’s disease (HD), a devastatingly progressive genetic disorder that results in death 10–20 years after disease onset and diagnosis. No therapy presently exists for HD; therefore, this highly innovative project aims to deliver a medical breakthrough that will provide significant benefit for California’s estimated > 2000 HD patients and the family members, friends and medical system that care for them. The proposed research will be performed at a biotechnology startup, a leading academic research center and two contract research organizations, all of which are California-based. The work will over time involve more than 10 California scientists, thereby helping to employ tax-paying citizens and maintain the State’s advanced technical base. Finally, an effective, proprietary drug for the treatment of HD is expected to be highly valuable and to attract favorable financial terms upon out-licensing for development and commercialization. These revenues would flow to the California companies and institutions (including CIRM) that would have a stake in the proceeds.

The CIRM Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Biorepository – A Resource for Safe Storage and Distribution of High Quality iPSCs

Funding Type: 
hPSC Repository
Grant Number: 
IR1-06600
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$9 999 834
Disease Focus: 
Developmental Disorders
Heart Disease
Infectious Disease
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Autism
Respiratory Disorders
Vision Loss
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Critical to the long term success of the CIRM iPSC Initiative of generating and ensuring the availability of high quality disease-specific human IPSC lines is the establishment and successful operation of a biorepository with proven methods for quality control, safe storage and capabilities for worldwide distribution of high quality, highly-characterized iPSCs. Specifically the biorepository will be responsible for receipt, expansion, quality characterization, safe storage and distribution of human pluripotent stem cells generated by the CIRM stem cell initiative. This biobanking resource will ensure the availability of the highest quality hiPSC resources for researchers to use in disease modeling, target discovery and drug discovery and development for prevalent, genetically complex diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients and subsequently, the ability to differentiate these iPSCs into disease-relevant cell types holds great promise in facilitating the “disease-in-a-dish” approach for studying our understanding of the pathological mechanisms of human disease. iPSCs have already proven to be a useful model for several monogenic diseases such as Parkinson’s, Fragile X Syndrome, Schizophrenia, Spinal Muscular Atrophy, and inherited metabolic diseases such as 1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial hypercholesterolemia, and glycogen storage disease. In addition, the differentiated cells obtained from iPSCs represent a renewable, disease-relevant cell model for high-throughput drug screening and toxicology/safety assessment which will ultimately lead to the successful development of new therapeutic agents. iPSCs also hold great hope for advancing the use of live cells as therapies for correcting the physiological manifestations caused by disease or injury.

Generation and characterization of high-quality, footprint-free human induced pluripotent stem cell lines from 3,000 donors to investigate multigenic diseases

Funding Type: 
hiPSC Derivation
Grant Number: 
ID1-06557
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$16 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Developmental Disorders
Genetic Disorder
Heart Disease
Infectious Disease
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Autism
Respiratory Disorders
Vision Loss
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the potential to differentiate to nearly any cells of the body, thereby providing a new paradigm for studying normal and aberrant biological networks in nearly all stages of development. Donor-specific iPSCs and differentiated cells made from them can be used for basic and applied research, for developing better disease models, and for regenerative medicine involving novel cell therapies and tissue engineering platforms. When iPSCs are derived from a disease-carrying donor; the iPSC-derived differentiated cells may show the same disease phenotype as the donor, producing a very valuable cell type as a disease model. To facilitate wider access to large numbers of iPSCs in order to develop cures for polygenic diseases, we will use a an episomal reprogramming system to produce 3 well-characterized iPSC lines from each of 3,000 selected donors. These donors may express traits related to Alzheimer’s disease, autism spectrum disorders, autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cerebral palsy, diabetes, or respiratory diseases. The footprint-free iPSCs will be derived from donor peripheral blood or skin biopsies. iPSCs made by this method have been thoroughly tested, routinely grown at large scale, and differentiated to produce cardiomyocytes, neurons, hepatocytes, and endothelial cells. The 9,000 iPSC lines developed in this proposal will be made widely available to stem cell researchers studying these often intractable diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer great promise to the large number of Californians suffering from often intractable polygenic diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, autism spectrum disorders, autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and respiratory disease. iPSCs can be generated from numerous adult tissues, including blood or skin, in 4–5 weeks and then differentiated to almost any desired terminal cell type. When iPSCs are derived from a disease-carrying donor, the iPSC-derived differentiated cells may show the same disease phenotype as the donor. In these cases, the cells will be useful for understanding disease biology and for screening drug candidates, and California researchers will benefit from access to a large, genetically diverse iPSC bank. The goal of this project is to reprogram 3,000 tissue samples from patients who have been diagnosed with various complex diseases and from healthy controls. These tissue samples will be used to generate fully characterized, high-quality iPSC lines that will be banked and made readily available to researchers for basic and clinical research. These efforts will ultimately lead to better medicines and/or cellular therapies to treat afflicted Californians. As iPSC research progresses to commercial development and clinical applications, more and more California patients will benefit and a substantial number of new jobs will be created in the state.

Restoration of memory in Alzheimer’s disease: a new paradigm using neural stem cell therapy

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Development - Research
Grant Number: 
DR2A-05416
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$20 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, results in profound loss of memory and cognitive function, and ultimately death. In the US, someone develops AD every 69 seconds and there are over 5 million individuals suffering from AD, including approximately 600,000 Californians. Current treatments do not alter the disease course. The absence of effective therapies coupled with the sheer number of affected patients renders AD a medical disorder of unprecedented need and a public health concern of significant magnitude. In 2010, the global economic impact of dementias was estimated at $604 billion, a figure far beyond the costs of cancer or heart disease. These numbers do not reflect the devastating social and emotional tolls that AD inflicts upon patients and their families. Efforts to discover novel and effective treatments for AD are ongoing, but unfortunately, the number of active clinical studies is low and many traditional approaches have failed in clinical testing. An urgent need to develop novel and innovative approaches to treat AD is clear. We propose to evaluate the use of human neural stem cells as a potential innovative therapy for AD. AD results in neuronal death and loss of connections between surviving neurons. The hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory, is particularly affected in AD, and is thought to underlie the memory problems AD patients encounter. Evidence from animal studies shows that transplanting human neural stem cells into the hippocampus improves memory, possibly by providing growth factors that protect neurons from degeneration. Translating this approach to humans could markedly restore memory and thus, quality of life for patients. The Disease Team has successfully initiated three clinical trials involving transplantation of human neural stem cells for neurological disorders. These trials have established that the cells proposed for this therapeutic approach are safe for transplantation into humans. The researchers in this Disease Team have shown that AD mice show a dramatic improvement in memory skills following both murine and human stem cell transplantation. With proof-of-concept established in these studies, the Disease Team intends to conduct the animal studies necessary to seek authorization by the FDA to start testing this therapeutic approach in human patients. This project will be conducted as a partnership between a biotechnology company with unique experience in clinical trials involving neural stem cell transplantation and a leading California-based academic laboratory specializing in AD research. The Disease Team also includes expert clinicians and scientists throughout California that will help guide the research project to clinical trials. The combination of all these resources will accelerate the research, and lead to a successful FDA submission to permit human testing of a novel approach for the treatment of AD; one that could enhance memory and save lives.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The number of AD patients in the US has surpassed 5.4 million, and the incidence may triple by 2050. Roughly 1 out of every 10 patients with AD, over 550,000, is a California resident, and alarmingly, because of the large number of baby-boomers that reside in this state, the incidence is expected to more than double by 2025. Besides the personal impact of the diagnosis on the patient, the rising incidence of disease, both in the US and California, imperils the federal and state economy. The dementia induced by AD disconnects patients from their loved ones and communities by eroding memory and cognitive function. Patients gradually lose their ability to drive, work, cook, and carry out simple, everyday tasks, ultimately losing all independence. The quality of life for AD patients is hugely diminished and the burden on their families and caregivers is extremely costly to the state of California. Annual health care costs are estimated to exceed $172 billion, not including the additional costs resulting from the loss of income and physical and emotional stress experienced by caregivers of Alzheimer's patients. Given that California is the most populous state and the state with the highest number of baby-boomers, AD’s impact on California families and state finances is proportionally high and will only increase as the AD prevalence rises. Currently, there is no cure for AD and no means of prevention. Most approved therapies address only symptomatic aspects of AD and no disease-modifying approaches are currently available. By enacting Proposition 71, California voters acknowledged and supported the need to investigate the potential of novel stem cell-based therapies to treat diseases with a significant unmet medical need such as AD. In a disease like AD, any therapy that exerts even a modest impact on the patient's ability to carry out daily activities will have an exponential positive effect not only for the patients but also for their families, caregivers, and the entire health care system. We propose to evaluate the hypothesis that neural stem cell transplantation will delay the progression of AD by slowing or stabilizing loss of memory and related cognitive skills. A single, one-time intervention may be sufficient to delay progression of neuronal degeneration and preserve functional levels of memory and cognition; an approach that offers considerable cost-efficiency. The potential economic impact of this type of therapeutic research in California could be significant, and well worth the investment of this disease team proposal. Such an approach would not only reduce the high cost of care and improve the quality of life for patients, it would also make California an international leader in a pioneering approach to AD, yielding significant downstream economic benefits for the state.

Targeting Stem Cells to Enhance Remyelination in the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05617
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$4 327 175
Disease Focus: 
Multiple Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease in which the myelin sheath that insulates neurons is destroyed, resulting in loss of proper neuronal function. Existing treatments for MS are based on strategies that suppress the immune response. While these drugs do provide benefit by reducing relapses and delaying progression (but have significant side effects), the disease invariably progresses. We are pursuing an alternative therapy aimed at regeneration of the myelin sheath through drugs that act on an endogenous stem cell population in the central nervous system termed oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). Remission in MS is largely dependent upon OPCs migrating to sites of injury and subsequently differentiating into oligodendrocytes – the cells that synthesize myelin and are capable of neuronal repair. Previous studies indicate that in progressive MS, OPCs are abundantly present at sites of damage but fail to differentiate to oligodendrocytes. As such, drug-like molecules capable of inducing OPC differentiation should have significant potential, used alone or in combination with existing immunomodulatory agents, for the treatment of MS. The objective of this project is to identify a development candidate (DC) for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) that functions by directly stimulating the differentiation of the adult stem cells required for remyelination.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a painful, neurodegenerative disease that leads to an impairment of physical and cognitive abilities. Patients with MS are often forced to stop working because their condition becomes so limiting. MS can interfere with a patient's ability to even perform simple routine daily activities, resulting in a decreased quality of life. Existing treatments for MS delay disease progression and minimize symptoms, however, the disease invariably progresses to a state of chronic demyelination. The goal of this project is to identify novel promyelinating drugs, based on differentiation of an endogenous stem cell population. Such drugs would be used in combination with existing immunosuppressive drugs to prevent disease progression and restore proper neuronal activity. More effective MS treatment strategies represent a major unmet medical need that could impact the roughly 50,000 Californians suffering from this disease. Clearly the development of a promyelinating therapeutic would have a significant impact on the well-being of Californians and reduce the negative economic impact on the state resulting from this degenerative disease.
Progress Report: 
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the destruction of the myelin sheath that insulates neurons, resulting in loss of proper neuronal function. Existing treatments for MS are based exclusively on strategies that suppress the immune response. We are pursuing an alternative stem cell-based therapeutic approach aimed at enhancing regeneration of the myelin sheath. Specifically, we are focused on the identification of drug-like molecules capable of inducing oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) differentiation. To date, we have identified a series approved drugs that effectively induce OPC differentiation under tissue culture conditions. Additionally, we have demonstrated that several of these drug candidates reduce MS-like symptoms in relevant rodent models of the disease. We are currently conducting detailed pharmacology experiments to determine which of the identified molecules will serve as the best candidate for future clinical development.

Immune-Matched Neural Stem Cell Transplantation for Pediatric Neurodegenerative Disease

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05476
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$5 509 978
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Children with inherited degenerative diseases of the brain will be among the first to benefit from novel approaches based on stem cell therapy (SCT). This assertion is based on a number of medical and experimental observations and precedents including: 1) These diseases currently lack effective therapies and can cause profound mental retardation or lead to death; 2) SCT has already been shown to work in the milder forms of similar diseases that do not affect the brain; 3) Experimental work and early clinical studies have clearly shown that stem cells delivered directly into the brain can be used to treat diseases affecting the brain; and 4) The clinical safety of stem cells delivered directly into the brain has already been established during recent Phase 1 clinical trials. Our approach is designed to lead to a therapeutic development candidate, based on stem cells, by addressing two critical issues: (i) that early intervention is not only required but is indeed possible in this patient population and that, (ii) induction of immune tolerance is also required. We not only address these two important issues but also set the stage for efficient translation of our approach into clinical practice, by adapting transplant techniques that are standard in clinical practice or in clinical trials and using laboratory cell biology methods that are easily transferrable to the scale and processes of clinical cell manufacturing.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
We are focusing on a class of childhood brain diseases that causes a child's brain to degenerate and results in severe mental retardation or death, in addition to damage to many other organ systems. These diseases are not yet represented in CIRM’s portfolio. Recently blood stem cell transplantation has been applied to these diseases, showing that some of the organ systems can be rescued by stem cell therapy. Unfortunately, the brain component of the disease is not impacted by blood stem cell therapy. Our team proposes to take these important lessons to develop a therapy that treats all organ dysfunction, including brain. Because of the established stem cell success in the clinical treatment of non-brain organs and the experimental treatment of the brain, we propose a novel, combined stem cell therapy. Based on our own work and recent clinical experience, this dual stem cell therapy has a high probability of success for slowing or reversing disease, and importantly, will not require children to be treated with toxic immunosuppressive drugs. This therapy will thus benefit California by: 1) reducing disease burden in individuals and the State's burden for caring for these children; 2) providing a successful model of stem cell therapy of the brain that will both bolster public confidence in CIRM's mission to move complex stem cell therapies into the clinic; and 3) laying the groundwork for using this type of therapy with other brain diseases of children.
Progress Report: 
  • The purpose of the ET3RA is to establish an experimental model of stem cell transplantation that accomplishes two equally important goals: 1) to devise a strategy of protection of the child's brain from the ravages of certain genetic diseases and 2) to devise a simultaneous strategy of transplantation that avoids immune system rejection. In our first year of work, we have shown that we can reliably produce the stem cells that we want to transplant into the brains of experimental animals (mice). We have also bred sufficient numbers of mice for the transplant experiments and have started the immune system-based strategy of transplantation. This puts us in the proper position to begin the brain stem cell transplantation in year 2. Thus, we are on course to accomplishing our goals for this ET3RA and for eventual development of this strategy for the initiation of clinical trials.

Identifying Drugs for Alzheimer's Disease with Human Neurons Made From Human IPS cells

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05577
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 857 600
Disease Focus: 
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
We propose to discover new drug candidates for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), which is common, fatal, and for which no effective disease-modifying drugs are available. Because no effective AD treatment is available or imminent, we propose to discover novel candidates by screening purified human brain cells made from human reprogrammed stem cells (human IPS cells or hIPSC) from patients that have rare and aggressive hereditary forms of AD. We have already discovered that such human brain cells exhibit an unique biochemical behavior that indicates early development of AD in a dish. Thus, we hope to find new drugs by using the new tools of human stem cells that were previously unavailable. We think that human brain cells in a dish will succeed where animal models and other types of cells have thus far failed.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that afflicts millions of Californians. The emotional and financial impact on families and on the state healthcare budget is enormous. This project seeks to find new drugs to treat this terrible disease. If we are successful our work in the long-term may help diminish the social and familial cost of AD, and lead to establishment of new businesses in California using our approaches to drug discovery for AD.
Progress Report: 
  • We have made steady and significant progress in developing a way to use human reprogrammed stem cells to develop drugs for Alzheimer's disease. In the more recent project term we have further refined our key assay, and generated sufficient cells to enable screening of 50,000 different chemical candidates that might reveal potential drugs for this terrible disease. With a little bit of additional refinement, we will be able to begin our search in earnest in collaboration with the Sanford-Burnham Prebys Screening Center.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Neurological Disorders

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine