Neurological Disorders

Coding Dimension ID: 
303
Coding Dimension path name: 
Neurological Disorders

New Cell Lines for Huntington's Disease

Funding Type: 
New Cell Lines
Grant Number: 
RL1-00678
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 369 800
Disease Focus: 
Huntington's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with a 1/10,000 disease risk that always leads to death. These numbers do not fully reflect the large societal and familial cost of HD, which requires extensive caregiving and has a 50% chance of passing the mutation to the next generation. Current treatments treat some symptoms but do not change the course of disease. Symptoms of the disease include movement abnormalities, inability to perform daily tasks and and psychiatric problems. A loss os specific regions of the brain are observed. The mutation for HD is an expansion of a region of repeated DNA in the HD gene and the longer the repeat, in general the earlier the onset of disease. While the length of this polyglutamine repeat largely determines the age-of-onset, there is variance in onset age that is not accounted for by repeat length but is determined by genetic and environmental factors. In addition, the symptoms can vary significantly among patients in a non-repeat dependent manner. To assist in preventing onset of HD, there is a great need to identify genes that are involved in why one individual with 45 repeats will manifest symptoms at age 40 while another manifests symptoms at age 70. Further, there is a lack of early readouts to determine when to begin HD treatments. Because the disease mutation is known, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is possible and mutant Htt embryos are available. Stem cell lines can be derived from PGD embryos with varying repeat lengths and genetic backgrounds to provide new methods to identify genetic modifiers and readouts of disease progression. The development of pluripotent stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) cells, derived directly from HD patient fibroblasts, would also provide new methods for these analyses. Chemical compound screens to identify drugs that protect against the effect of mutant Htt protein expression in patient derived hESCs cells would allow evaluation of drug responses in on cells having different genetic backgrounds Ultimately, the iPS cells can provide a way to transplant neurons or neuronal support cells from affected individuals or from unaffected family members having a normal range repeat. Such cells would help reduce immune rejection effects likely to occur with transplantation, however, while patient-derived cells overcome the problems of immune rejection, the mutant protein is still expressed. To overcome this problem we will genetically modify these stem cells to reduce the mutant protein and produce a normal gene. Beyond the immediate application to HD, the development of these models is applicable to a range of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The disability and loss of earning power and personal freedom resulting from Huntington's disease (HD) is devastating and creates a financial burden for California. Individuals are struck in the prime of life, at a point when they are their most productive and have their highest earning potential. Further, as the disease progressives, individuals require institutional care facilities at great financial cost. Therapies using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the potential to change the lives of hundreds of individuals and their families, which brings the human cost into the thousands. Further, hESCs from HD patients will help us understand the factors that dictate the course of the disease and provide a resource for drug development. For the potential of hESCs in HD to be realized, a very forward approach such as that proposed will allow experienced investigators in HD and stem cell research and clinical trials to come together and create cell lines to more fully mimic the diseases neurons and allow for future treatment options. The federal constraints on hESCs create a critical need for the development of treatments using hESCs supported and staffed with non-federal funds. We have proposed goals and strategies for generating new stem cells derived from patient preimplantation diagnosis embryos and patient fibroblasts. We have put in place critical milestones to be met We will build on existing regional stem cell resources . Anticipated benefits to the citizens of California include: 1) development of new stem cell lines that will allow us to more closely model the disease for mechanistic studies and drug screening, 2) improved methods for following the course of the disease in order to treat HD as early as possible before symptoms are manifest; 3) development of new cell-based treatments for Huntington's disease with application to other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases that affect thousands of individuals in California; 4) development of intellectual property that could form the basis of new biotech startup companies; and 5) improved methods for drug development that could directly benefit citizens of the state.
Progress Report: 
  • Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with a 1/10,000 disease risk that always leads to death. These numbers do not fully reflect the large societal and familial cost of HD, which requires extensive caregiving and has a 50% chance of passing the mutation to the next generation. Current treatments treat some symptoms but do not change the course of disease. Symptoms of the disease include movement abnormalities, inability to perform daily tasks and psychiatric problems. A loss of specific regions of the brain are observed. The mutation for HD is an expansion of a region of repeated DNA in the HD gene and the longer the repeat, in general the earlier the onset of disease. While the length of this polyglutamine repeat largely determines the age-of-onset, there is variance in onset age that is not accounted for by repeat length but is determined by genetic and environmental factors. In addition, the symptoms can vary significantly among patients in a non-repeat dependent manner. There is a lack of early readouts to determine when to begin HD treatments. Because the disease mutation is known, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is possible and mutant Htt embryos are available. We have obtained a number of HD PGD embryos with varying repeat lengths and genetic backgrounds to derive hES cell lines and provide new methods to identify genetic modifiers and readouts of disease progression. Development of multiple lines has begun during this funding period. The development of pluripotent stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, derived directly from HD patient fibroblasts, also provide new methods for these analyses. We have begun the establishment of a bank of HD fibroblasts and have derived three new iPS lines to date with unique CAG repeat expansions. Characterization of the lines for HD phenotypes is in progress. An additional line is being generated and additional fibroblast collection from both HD patients and individuals who do not carry the HD gene is planned for the coming year to generate other sets of iPS lines. These lines will allow mechanistic studies and chemical compound screens to identify drugs that protect against the effect of mutant Htt protein expression in patient derived stem cells to be performed. Ultimately, the iPS cells will provide a way to transplant neurons or neuronal support cells from affected individuals or from unaffected family members having a normal range repeat. Such cells would help reduce immune rejection effects likely to occur with transplantation, however, while patient-derived cells overcome the problems of immune rejection, the mutant protein is still expressed. To overcome this problem we will genetically modify these stem cells to reduce the mutant protein and produce a normal gene in the next portion of the project.
  • Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease that strikes in mid-life and inevitably leads to death. As it is genetic, offspring of affected individuals are 50% at risk. Current medications treat some symptoms, which include movement abnormalities, inability to perform daily tasks and psychiatric problems, but do not change the course of disease. The mutation for HD is an expansion of a region of repeated DNA in the HD gene. In general, the longer the repeat the earlier the onset of disease. While the length of this polyglutamine repeat largely determines the age-of-onset, there is variance in onset age that is not accounted for by repeat length but is determined by genetic and environmental factors. In addition, the symptoms can vary significantly among patients in a non-repeat dependent manner. There is a lack of early readouts to determine when to begin HD treatments. Because the disease mutation is known, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is possible and mutant Htt embryos are available. We have obtained a number of HD PGD embryos with varying repeat lengths and genetic backgrounds to derive hES cell lines and have derived a line that is now fully characterized as a stem cell line. The development of pluripotent stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, derived directly from HD patient skin cells (fibroblasts), also provide new methods for these analyses. We have made significant progress in establishing a bank of HD fibroblasts and have derived seven new iPS lines to date with unique CAG repeat expansions. Characterization of the lines for HD phenotypes is either complete or in progress. Additional lines are being generated and additional fibroblast collection from both HD patients and individuals who do not carry the HD gene is planned for the coming year to generate other sets of iPS lines. These lines will allow mechanistic studies and chemical compound screens to identify drugs that protect against the effect of mutant Htt protein expression in patient derived stem cells to be performed.
  • Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease that strikes in mid-life and inevitably leads to death. As it is genetic, offspring of affected individuals are 50% at risk. Current medications treat some symptoms, which include movement abnormalities, inability to perform daily tasks and psychiatric problems, but do not change the course of disease. The mutation for HD is an expansion of a region of repeated DNA in the HD gene. In general, the longer the repeat the earlier the onset of disease. While the length of this polyglutamine repeat largely determines the age-of-onset, there is variance in onset age that is not accounted for by repeat length but is determined by genetic and environmental factors. In addition, the symptoms can vary significantly among patients in a non-repeat dependent manner. There is a lack of early readouts to determine when to begin HD treatments. Because the disease mutation is known, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is possible and mutant Htt embryos are available. We have obtained HD PGD embryos and have derived a line that is now fully characterized as a stem cell line that is capable of becoming brain cells. The development of pluripotent stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, derived directly from HD patient skin cells (fibroblasts), also provide new methods for these analyses. We have established a bank of HD fibroblasts and have derived seven new iPS lines with unique CAG repeat expansions. Characterization of the lines for HD symptoms is either complete or in progress. Additional lines are being generated and additional skin cells collected from both HD patients and individuals who do not carry the HD gene. These lines are allowing mechanistic studies and chemical compound screens to identify drugs that protect against the effect of mutant Htt protein expression in patient derived stem cells to be performed. Finally, we are developing a method to reduce the level of the mutant protein to provide options for future transplantation from an individual's own skin cells to prevent immune rejection.

Establishment of Frontotemporal Dementia Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cell Lines with Defined Genetic Mutations

Funding Type: 
New Cell Lines
Grant Number: 
RL1-00650
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 708 560
Disease Focus: 
Dementia
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
We propose to generate induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from skin cells derived from human subjects with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). FTD accounts for 15–20% of all dementia cases and, with newly identified genetic causes, is now recognized as the most common dementia in patients under 65 years of age. FTD patients suffer progressive neurodegeneration in the frontal and temporal lobes and other brain regions, resulting in behavioral changes and memory and motor neuron deficits. The median age of onset for this devastating disease is 58 years, and disease progression is rapid, with death in 3–8 years. Compared with other age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases, the molecular, cellular, and genetic bases of FTD remain poorly understood. Genetic causes are estimated to account for ~40% of FTD. In addition to tau identified in 1998, mutations in three causative genes have been identified during the last three years. The identification of FTD mutations opens exciting new avenues for understanding the causes of FTD. Research on these mutations will help to identify effective therapies. However, the ability to study the functions of these factors is severely limited due to the lack of available human neurons from FTD patients. To address the need for disease– and patient–specific neurons, we will use the powerful new technique of iPS cells. iPS cells are derived from skin cells and can be used to generate any cell types in the body, including neurons. We will obtain human skin cells from FTD patients with disease-causing mutations and generate many FTD mutation–specific iPS cell lines. We will then use these iPS cells to generate FTD mutation–specific neurons to study disease mechanisms. The bank of iPS cell lines we generate will also enable the development of sensitive assays for drug screening and testing of therapeutic agents for treating FTD. All cell lines will be made available to the global FTD research community. The generation of human neurons from FTD patients will be a tremendous advance toward finding a cure for this disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
California is the U.S. leader in basic research into stem cell–based therapies for disease. To help California remain at the forefront of research on neurological disease, we propose to use induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells—a revolutionary new technique developed recently by Dr. Shinya Yamanaka—to target frontotemporal dementia (FTD). FTD is a devastating and common form of dementia. {REDACTED} The proposed research will establish California as the leader in generating human patient–specific neurons from iPS cells. The potential long-term benefits to California include growth of the clinical enterprise in the diagnosis and treatment of FTD, the establishment of biotechnology to generate new drugs for FTD, and potential intellectual properties for driving private enterprises to develop therapies.
Progress Report: 
  • In this grant, we proposed to generate induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from skin cells derived from human subjects with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). FTD accounts for 15–20% of all dementia cases and, with newly identified genetic causes, is now recognized as the most common dementia in patients under 65 years of age. FTD patients suffer progressive neurodegeneration in the frontal and temporal lobes and other brain regions, resulting in behavioral changes and memory and motor neuron deficits. The median age of onset of this devastating disease is 58 years, and it progresses rapidly, causing death in 3–8 years. Compared with other age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases, the molecular, cellular, and genetic bases of FTD are poorly understood. Genetic causes are estimated to account for ~40% of FTD. In addition to tau identified in 1998, mutations in three causative genes have been identified during the last three years. The identification of FTD mutations opens exciting new avenues for understanding the causes of FTD. Research on these mutations will help to identify effective therapies. However, the ability to study the functions of these factors is severely limited due to the lack of available human neurons from FTD patients. To address the need for disease– and patient–specific neurons, we proposed to use the powerful new technique of iPS cells. iPS cells are derived from skin cells and can be used to generate any cell types in the body, including neurons. During the last 10 months, we have obtained human skin cells from more than 30 FTD patients with disease-causing mutations and unaffected family members. We have generated about 200 putative iPS cell lines from two FTD patients with defined genetic mutations, one sporadic case, and one control. We characterized some of the iPS cell lines and differentiated one patient-specific iPS cell line into human postmitotic neurons. These results represent a major advance toward finding a cure for FTD, and we will continue to pursue this line of research as proposed.
  • We have collected numerous skin samples from patients with a kind of dementia that affects the frontal lobes. We have also collected samples from unaffected family members (controls). For many of these samples we have made induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), which can give rise to any cell type. We are in the process of generating neurons from these stem cells. Our hope and intention is to study these cells to learn about the mechanisms that give rise to this dementia and to be able to test potential therapies.
  • We have collected numerous skin samples from patients with a kind of dementia that affects the frontal lobes. We have also collected samples from unaffected family members (controls). For many of these samples we have made induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), which can give rise to any cell type. We are in the process of generating neurons and other cell types, such as cells that mediate inflammation, from these stem cells. Our hope and intention is to study these cells to learn about the mechanisms that give rise to this dementia and to be able to test potential therapies.

Development of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Modeling Human Disease

Funding Type: 
New Cell Lines
Grant Number: 
RL1-00649
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 737 720
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Autism
Blood Disorders
Rett's Syndrome
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) hold great promise in regenerative medicine and cell replacement therapies because of their unique ability to self-renew and their developmental potential to form all cell lineages in the body. Traditional techniques for generating hESC rely on surplus IVF embryos and are incompatible with the generation of genetically diverse, patient or disease specific stem cells. Recently, it was reported that adult human skin cells could be induced to revert back to earlier stages of development and exhibit properties of authentic hES cells. The exact method for “reprogramming” has not been optimized but currently involves putting multiple genes into skin cells and then exposing the cells to specific chemical environments tailored to hES cell growth. While these cells appear to have similar developmental potential as hES cells, they are not derived from human embryos. To distinguish these reprogrammed cells from the embryonic sourced hES cells, they are termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Validating and optimizing the reprogramming method would prove very useful for the generation of individual cell lines from many different patients to study the nature and complexity of disease. In addition, the problems of immune rejection for future therapeutic applications of this work will be greatly relieved by being able to generate reprogrammed cells from individual patients. We have initiated a series of studies to reprogram human and mouse fibroblasts to iPS cells using the genes that have already been suggested. While induction of these genes in various combinations have been reported to reprogram human cells, we plan to optimize conditions for generating iPS cells using methods that can control the level of the “reprogramming” genes, and also can be used to excise the inducing genes once reprogramming is complete; thus avoiding unanticipated effects on the iPS cells. Once we have optimized the methods of inducing human iPS cells from human fibroblasts, we will make iPS cells from patients with 2 different neurological diseases. We will then coax these iPS cells into specific types of neurons using methods pioneered and established in our lab to explore the biological processes that lead to these neurological diseases. Once we generate these cell based models of neural diseases, we can use these cells to screen for drugs that block the progress, or reverse the detrimental effects of neural degeneration. Additionally, we will use the reprogramming technique to study models of human blood and liver disease. In these cases, genetically healthy skin cells will be reprogrammed to iPS cells, followed by introduction of the deficient gene and then coaxed to differentiate into therapeutic cell types to be used in transplantation studies in animal models of these diseases. The ability of the reprogrammed cell types to rescue the disease state will serve as a proof of principle for therapeutic grafting in
Statement of Benefit to California: 
It has been close to a decade since the culture of human embryonic stem (hES) cells was first established. To this day there are still a fairly limited number of stem cell lines that are available for study due in part to historic federal funding restrictions and the challenges associated with deriving hES cell lines from human female egg cells or discarded embryos. In this proposal we aim to advance the revolutionary new reprogramming technique for generating new stem cell lines from adult cells, thus avoiding the technical and ethical challenges associated with the use of human eggs or embryos, and creating the tools and environment to generate the much needed next generation of human stem cell lines. Stem cells offer a great potential to treat a vast array of diseases that affect the citizens of our state. The establishment of these reprogramming techniques will enable the development of cellular models of human disease via the creation of new cell lines with genetic predisposition for specific diseases. Our proposal aims to establish cellular models of two specific neurological diseases, as well as developing methods for studying blood and liver disorders that can be alleviated by stem cell therapies. California has thrived as a state with a diverse population, but the stem cell lines currently available represent a very limited genetic diversity. In order to understand the variation in response to therapeutics, we need to generate cell lines that match the rich genetic diversity of our state. The generation of disease-specific and genetically diverse stem cell lines will represent great potential not only for CA health care patients but also for our state’s pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries in terms of improved models for drug discovery and toxicological testing. California is a strong leader in clinical research developments. To maintain this position we need to be able to create stem cell lines that are specific to individual patients to overcome the challenges of immune rejection and create safe and effective transplantation therapies. Our proposal advances the very technology needed to address these issues. As a further benefit to California stem cell researchers, we will be making available the new stem cell lines created by our work.
Progress Report: 
  • Public Summary for: CIRM New Cell Line Project - Progress Report.
  • Our research team has been working over the last year on developing new human stem cell lines that are specifically useful for studying human diseases and developing new therapeutic strategies. Human embryonic stem (hES) cells were first established in 1998 and in the past decade have been shown to be capable to differentiating to a vast array of different cell types. This full developmental potential is termed pluripotency. Until recently these were the only established human cell type that could be robustly grown in the laboratory setting and still maintain full pluripotent developmental potential. In November of 1997, a new type of human pluripotent cell was created. By turning on a set of 4 genes, researchers succeeded in reprogramming human skin cells back into a cell type that appeared to have very similar properties and potential as the hES cell. These new stem cells are called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in order to keep the name distinct from their embryonic derived counterpart. One of the scientific limitations of hES cells is the impracticality of generating patient or disease specific stem cell lines. This opportunity now becomes theoretically practical with the advent of human iPS cell line generation. We report here on significant progress demonstrating the practicality of generating disease-linked cellular models of human diseases.
  • We have identified 2 specific human neurological diseases that have a known, or strongly suggested genetic component, and have set about to generate disease-linked iPS cell lines. We have obtained skin cell samples from patients with these neurological diseases and have successfully reprogrammed them back to iPS cells. These disease-linked pluripotent stem cells have been carefully characterized and we have demonstrated that they do indeed behave very similar to existing hES cells and also to the genetically healthy control iPS cell lines that we have generated. Therefore the disease phenotype is not detrimental to reprogramming or proliferation as a stem cell. Furthermore, we have succeeded in coaxing these disease-linked iPS cells to turn into specific types of human neurons, the very cells that are suspected to be involved in the neurological disorders. We now have established a viable model for studying human neural disorders in the laboratory, and have already observed some potentially important functional differences between the disease-linked and control iPS generated neurons. In the coming year we will be evaluating the differences between the disease-linked and control neurons and investigating potential therapeutic approaches to stop or reverse the defects.
  • We have also been working on developing new methods for generating iPS cells that will make them more useful in clinical or pre-clinical settings where it is important that the original set of 4 genes used to reprogram the skin cells are removed once they have become iPS cells. Significant progress has been made in this regard and will be completed in the coming year. Looking forward we will also be applying this approach to generate human disease-linked iPS cells for specific hematological (blood) related disorders. The derivation of iPS-based models of hematological disorders will allow us develop gene therapy approaches to correct the disease causing defects and establish proof of principle for therapeutic approaches.
  • This research project is focused on developing new human stem cell lines that are specifically useful for studying human diseases and developing new therapeutic strategies. Human embryonic stem (hES) cells were first established in 1998 and in the past decade have been shown to be capable of differentiating to a vast array of different cell types. This full developmental potential is termed "pluripotency." Until recently these were the only established human cell types that could be robustly grown in the laboratory setting and still maintain full pluripotent developmental potential. In November 1997 a new type of human pluripotent cell was created. By turning on a set of 4 genes, researchers succeeded in reprogramming human skin cells back into a cell type that appeared to have very similar properties and potential as the hES cell. These new stem cells are called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in order to keep the name distinct from their embryonic derived counterpart. One of the scientific limitations of hES cells is the impracticality of generating patient or disease specific stem cell lines. This opportunity now becomes theoretically practical with the advent of human iPS cell line generation. We report here on significant progress demonstrating the practicality of generating disease-linked cellular models of human diseases.
  • We have identified 2 specific human neurological diseases that have known, or strongly suggested, genetic components and have set about to generate disease-linked iPS cell lines. We have obtained skin cell samples from patients with these neurological diseases and have successfully reprogrammed them back to iPS cells. These disease-linked pluripotent stem cells have been carefully characterized and we have demonstrated that they do indeed behave very similar to existing hES cells and also to the genetically healthy control iPS cell lines that we have generated. Therefore, the disease phenotype is not detrimental to reprogramming or proliferation as a stem cell. Furthermore, we have succeeded in coaxing these disease-linked iPS cells to turn into specific types of human neurons, the very cells that are suspected to be involved in the neurological disorders. We now have established a viable model for studying human neural disorders in the laboratory, and have already observed some potentially important functional differences between the disease-linked and control iPS-generated neurons. Importantly, we have found defects in the function of disease-linked neurons that can be corrected in part following specific drug treatments. This discovery demonstrates the potential utility to use this method of modeling human diseases in the laboratory as a tool for understanding the detailed pathways, which might contribute to the development of the disease state and, importantly, as a target for screening potential therapeutic compounds that might be used to block or slow the progress of human neural disorders. In the coming year we will finalize our efforts on this project.
  • We have also succeeded in developing an improved method for the delivery of the reprogramming genes into the patient cells in order to become iPS cells. This method allows the reprogramming genes to be removed thus mitigating the potential for unwanted and potentially detrimental reactivation of these reprogramming genes subsequent to the iPS cell state. We have begun work using this new reprogramming methodology to generate iPS cell lines that are specifically linked to diseases of the blood and immune system. The new methodology appears to be working well and we anticipate completing the generation and characterization of these new disease-linked stem cell lines within the next year of this project.
  • This research project has been focused on developing new human stem cell lines that are specifically useful for studying human diseases and developing new therapeutic strategies. Human embryonic stem (hES) cells were first established in 1998 and in the past decade have been shown to be capable to differentiating of a vast array of different cell types. This full developmental potential is termed "pluripotency". Until recently these were the only established human cell type that could be robustly grown in the laboratory setting and still maintain full pluripotent developmental potential. In November of 2007, a new type of human pluripotent cell was created. By turning on a set of 4 genes, researchers succeeded in reprogramming human skin cells back into a cell type that appears to have very similar properties and potential as the hES cell. These new stem cells are called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in order to keep the name distinct from their embryonic derived counterpart. One of the scientific limitations of hES cells is the impracticality of generating patient or disease specific stem cell lines. This opportunity now becomes theoretically practical with the advent of human iPS cell line generation. We report here on significant progress demonstrating the practicality of generating disease-linked cellular models of human diseases.
  • We have identified 2 specific human neurological diseases, Rett’s Syndrome and Schizophrenia that have a known, or strongly suggested genetic components, and have set about to generate disease-linked iPS cell lines. We have obtained skin cell samples from patients with these neurological diseases and have successfully reprogrammed them back to iPS cells. These disease-linked pluripotent stem cells have been carefully characterized and we have demonstrated that they do indeed behave very similar to existing hES cells and also to the healthy control iPS cell lines that we have generated. Therefore, the disease phenotype is not detrimental to reprogramming or proliferation as a stem cell. Furthermore, we have succeeded in coaxing these disease-linked iPS cells to turn into specific types of functional human neurons, the very cells that are suspected to be involved in the neurological disorders. We now have established a viable model for studying human neural disorders in the laboratory, and have already observed some potentially important functional differences between the disease-linked and control iPS generated neurons. Importantly, we have found defects in the function of disease-linked neurons that can be corrected in part following specific drug treatments. This discovery demonstrates the potential utility to use this method of modeling human diseases in the laboratory as a tool for understanding the detailed pathways that might contribute to the development of the disease state and importantly as a target for screening potential therapeutic compounds that might be used to block or slow the progress of human neural disorders.
  • We have also succeeded in developing an improved method for the delivery of the reprogramming genes into the patient cells in order to become iPS cells. This method combines all the of the reprogramming genes into a single cassette, and also allows the reprogramming genes to be removed thus mitigating the potential for unwanted and potentially detrimental reactivation of these reprogramming genes subsequent to the iPS cell state. We have demonstrated the success of this new reprogramming methodology to generate iPS cell lines that are specifically linked to a disease of the immune system. In addition to creating a panel of disease-linked iPS cell lines that are free of the externally introduced reprogramming transgenes, we have shown progress in achieving correction of the DNA mutation that leads to the disease state. Our extended research on these new disease specific iPS cell lines has shown utility for creating in vitro models of human neural disorders, and potential for genetically corrected patient specific iPS cell lines that could be used for cell based transplantation therapies.

Generation and characterization of corticospinal neurons from human embryonic stem cells

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology III
Grant Number: 
RB3-02143
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 355 063
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
Public Abstract: 
A major goal of stem cell research is to generate various functional human cell types that can be used to better understand how these cells work and to use them directly in therapies. There are currently no effective treatments, let alone a cure, for many neurological conditions. Two particular devastating neurological conditions, spinal cord injury and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease) share a common element. That is, in both conditions, the corticospinal motor neurons that control skilled voluntary movement are severely damaged, leading to significant loss of motor control. There has been extensive research on spinal cord injury and ALS in recent years. In the field of spinal cord injury, much effort has been devoted to repairing the damaged nerve paths, but this has turned out to be extremely challenging. The work on ALS, on the other hand, has mostly focused on the spinal motor neurons (often referred to as the lower motor neurons in the context of ALS). Our proposed study focuses on the corticospinal motor neurons (or the upper motor neurons) and, more broadly, the subcerebral projection neurons. Taking clues from studies in mice, we aim to understand how the subcerebral projection neurons including the corticospinal motor neurons can be made from human embryonic stem cells. We will focus on the later steps in differentiation that are not well understood, which gave rise to different types of neurons in the cerebral cortex. To aid in this process, we have engineered a fluorescent reporter in human embryonic stem cells, which, when the stem cells are turned into corticospinal motor neurons and related subcerebral projection neurons, will light up – literally. We will probe the molecular control of this process and determine if corticospinal motor neurons made in a culture dish, when introduced back into an organism, can send projections to the spinal cord, as they would normally do during development. Most of our knowledge about the development of corticospinal motor neurons comes from studies with mouse models. As there are likely to be important differences between humans and mice, we will pay special attention to the similarities and differences between mouse and human corticospinal motor neurons. Knowledge gained from this study will pave the way to make better disease-models-in-a-dish for neurological conditions such as ALS and to develop therapies for ALS, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, stroke and other neurological conditions when corticospinal motor neurons are damaged.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Neurological conditions affect millions of Californians each year. Spinal cord injury is one particularly debilitating neurological condition. The disability, loss of earning power, and loss of personal freedom associated with spinal cord injury is devastating for the injured individual, and creates a financial burden of an estimated $400 million annually for the state of California. Research is the only solution as currently there is no cure for spinal cord injury. A major functional deficit for patients of spinal cord injury is the loss of motor control. Corticospinal motor neurons mediate skilled, voluntary movement in humans and damage to these neurons leads to severe disability. Our proposed study focuses on the understanding of how corticospinal motor neurons and, more broadly, subcerebral projection neurons can be made from human embryonic stem cells under culture conditions, and how they can be introduced back to central nervous system. Understanding this process will allow scientists to design ways to use these cells for transplantation therapies not only for spinal cord injury, but also for other neurological conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease). Effective treatments promoting functional repair will significantly increase personal independence for people with spinal cord injury and decrease the financial burden for the State of California. More importantly, treatments that enhance functional recovery will improve the quality of life for those who are directly or indirectly affected by spinal cord injury, ALS and other neurological conditions.
Progress Report: 
  • A major goal of stem cell research is to generate various functional human cell types to promote repair or replacement in injury or disease. Our lab studies the repair of central nervous system after injury such as a spinal cord injury. We have been utilizing a fluorescent reporter line we developed with CIRM funding to enrich and characterize human corticospinal motor neurons, a neuronal population that is damaged or lost in spinal cord injury and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease). These neurons control skilled voluntary movement in humans, the loss or damage of which leads to paralysis and disability. We have made significant progress in this funding period. We validated that our fluorescent reporter works as intended. We found that reporter gene expression represents cells of different developmental stages at different times of differentiation. We have done the first batches of transplantation studies to show that it is possible to use the reporter gene to track the cells and cellular processes in the host central nervous system. In addition, we have developed a separate reporter gene to universally mark all embryonic stem-derived cells, a tool that may be useful to other stem cell researchers. We are now ready to move to the next phase of the project: to characterize corticospinal motor neurons in more detail in vitro and in vivo. Knowledge gained from this study will pave the way to make better disease-models-in-a-dish for neurological conditions such as ALS and to develop therapies for ALS, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, stroke and other neurological conditions when corticospinal motor neurons are damaged of lost.
  • A major goal of stem cell research is to generate various functional human cell types to promote repair or replacement in injury or disease. Our lab studies the repair of central nervous system after injury such as a spinal cord injury. We have been utilizing a fluorescent reporter line we developed with CIRM funding to derive and characterize human corticospinal motor neurons, a neuronal population that is damaged or lost in spinal cord injury and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease). These neurons are of paramount importance to skilled voluntary movement in humans, the loss or damage of which leads to paralysis and disability. The goal for making a reporter line is that whenever the cells light up (literally), we will know what they have become the type of cells that we would wish to get. Following last year’s initial progress, we have made significant progress in this funding period. We found that our fluorescent reporter is useful in following the desired cell types throughout cell growth in culture dishes or after we introduce these cells into animal models by transplantation. We have performed experiments to validate the identity and usefulness of these cells. In culture, these cells exhibit the desired signature gene expression pattern, electrophysiological properties and morphologies as well. We will continue to improve our culture condition to maximize efficiency and purity. Meanwhile, we have transplanted these cells into the mouse brain to study them in the complex central nervous system because many of the properties cannot be studied in cell culture such as the connection of nerve cells to other brain area or spinal cord. We were excited to find that these cells, once transplanted, can survive, integrate into the mouse central nervous system, and send out long neuronal processes characteristic of endogenous nerve cells. Some of the projections appear to take the path of the projections of the corticospinal motor neurons, indicating that our approach will likely succeed. Thanks to CIRM’s support, we will continue to investigate the various parameters to improve our transplantation studies. Knowledge gained from this study will pave the way to make better disease-models-in-a-dish for neurological conditions such as ALS and to develop therapies for ALS, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, stroke and other neurological conditions when corticospinal motor neurons are damaged of lost.

Restoration of memory in Alzheimer’s disease: a new paradigm using neural stem cell therapy

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Development - Research
Grant Number: 
DR2A-05416
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$20 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Alzheimer's Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, results in profound loss of memory and cognitive function, and ultimately death. In the US, someone develops AD every 69 seconds and there are over 5 million individuals suffering from AD, including approximately 600,000 Californians. Current treatments do not alter the disease course. The absence of effective therapies coupled with the sheer number of affected patients renders AD a medical disorder of unprecedented need and a public health concern of significant magnitude. In 2010, the global economic impact of dementias was estimated at $604 billion, a figure far beyond the costs of cancer or heart disease. These numbers do not reflect the devastating social and emotional tolls that AD inflicts upon patients and their families. Efforts to discover novel and effective treatments for AD are ongoing, but unfortunately, the number of active clinical studies is low and many traditional approaches have failed in clinical testing. An urgent need to develop novel and innovative approaches to treat AD is clear. We propose to evaluate the use of human neural stem cells as a potential innovative therapy for AD. AD results in neuronal death and loss of connections between surviving neurons. The hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory, is particularly affected in AD, and is thought to underlie the memory problems AD patients encounter. Evidence from animal studies shows that transplanting human neural stem cells into the hippocampus improves memory, possibly by providing growth factors that protect neurons from degeneration. Translating this approach to humans could markedly restore memory and thus, quality of life for patients. The Disease Team has successfully initiated three clinical trials involving transplantation of human neural stem cells for neurological disorders. These trials have established that the cells proposed for this therapeutic approach are safe for transplantation into humans. The researchers in this Disease Team have shown that AD mice show a dramatic improvement in memory skills following both murine and human stem cell transplantation. With proof-of-concept established in these studies, the Disease Team intends to conduct the animal studies necessary to seek authorization by the FDA to start testing this therapeutic approach in human patients. This project will be conducted as a partnership between a biotechnology company with unique experience in clinical trials involving neural stem cell transplantation and a leading California-based academic laboratory specializing in AD research. The Disease Team also includes expert clinicians and scientists throughout California that will help guide the research project to clinical trials. The combination of all these resources will accelerate the research, and lead to a successful FDA submission to permit human testing of a novel approach for the treatment of AD; one that could enhance memory and save lives.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The number of AD patients in the US has surpassed 5.4 million, and the incidence may triple by 2050. Roughly 1 out of every 10 patients with AD, over 550,000, is a California resident, and alarmingly, because of the large number of baby-boomers that reside in this state, the incidence is expected to more than double by 2025. Besides the personal impact of the diagnosis on the patient, the rising incidence of disease, both in the US and California, imperils the federal and state economy. The dementia induced by AD disconnects patients from their loved ones and communities by eroding memory and cognitive function. Patients gradually lose their ability to drive, work, cook, and carry out simple, everyday tasks, ultimately losing all independence. The quality of life for AD patients is hugely diminished and the burden on their families and caregivers is extremely costly to the state of California. Annual health care costs are estimated to exceed $172 billion, not including the additional costs resulting from the loss of income and physical and emotional stress experienced by caregivers of Alzheimer's patients. Given that California is the most populous state and the state with the highest number of baby-boomers, AD’s impact on California families and state finances is proportionally high and will only increase as the AD prevalence rises. Currently, there is no cure for AD and no means of prevention. Most approved therapies address only symptomatic aspects of AD and no disease-modifying approaches are currently available. By enacting Proposition 71, California voters acknowledged and supported the need to investigate the potential of novel stem cell-based therapies to treat diseases with a significant unmet medical need such as AD. In a disease like AD, any therapy that exerts even a modest impact on the patient's ability to carry out daily activities will have an exponential positive effect not only for the patients but also for their families, caregivers, and the entire health care system. We propose to evaluate the hypothesis that neural stem cell transplantation will delay the progression of AD by slowing or stabilizing loss of memory and related cognitive skills. A single, one-time intervention may be sufficient to delay progression of neuronal degeneration and preserve functional levels of memory and cognition; an approach that offers considerable cost-efficiency. The potential economic impact of this type of therapeutic research in California could be significant, and well worth the investment of this disease team proposal. Such an approach would not only reduce the high cost of care and improve the quality of life for patients, it would also make California an international leader in a pioneering approach to AD, yielding significant downstream economic benefits for the state.
Progress Report: 
  • Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, results in profound loss of memory and cognitive function, and ultimately death. In the US, someone develops AD every 69 seconds and there are over 5 million individuals suffering from AD, including approximately 600,000 Californians. Current treatments do not alter the disease course. The absence of effective therapies coupled with the sheer number of affected patients renders AD a medical disorder of unprecedented need and a public health concern of significant magnitude. In 2010, the global economic impact of dementias was estimated at $604 billion, a figure far beyond the costs of cancer or heart disease. These numbers do not reflect the devastating social and emotional tolls that AD inflicts upon patients and their families. Efforts to discover novel and effective treatments for AD are ongoing, but unfortunately, the number of active clinical studies is low and many traditional approaches have failed in clinical testing. An urgent need to develop novel and innovative approaches to treat AD is clear.
  • We have proposed to evaluate the use of human neural stem cells as a potential innovative therapy for AD. AD results in neuronal death and loss of connections between surviving neurons. The hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory, is particularly affected in AD, and is thought to underlie the memory problems AD patients encounter. Evidence from previous animal studies shows that transplanting human neural stem cells into the hippocampus improves memory, possibly by providing growth factors that protect neurons from degeneration. Translating this approach to humans could markedly restore memory and thus, quality of life for patients.
  • In the first year of the loan, the Disease Team actively worked on 5 important milestones in our effort to develop the use of human neural stem cells for AD. Of those, 2 milestones have been completed and 3 are ongoing. Specifically, the team has initiated three animal studies believed necessary to seek authorization by the FDA to start testing this therapeutic approach in human patients; these studies were designed to confirm that transplantation of the neural stem cells leads to improved memory in animal models relevant for AD. We are currently collecting and analyzing the data generated in these mouse studies. We have also identified the neural stem cell line that will be used in patients and have made considerable progress in its manufacturing and banking. Finally, we have held a pre-IND meeting with the FDA in which we shared our plans for the preclinical and clinical studies; the meeting provided helpful guidance and assurances regarding our IND enabling activities.
  • This project is a partnership between a biotechnology company with unique experience in clinical trials involving neural stem cell transplantation and a leading California-based academic laboratory specializing in AD research. Together with expert clinicians and scientists throughout California, we continue to work towards a successful IND submission to permit human testing of a novel and unique approach for the treatment of AD.

Molecules to Correct Aberrant RNA Signature in Human Diseased Neurons

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05676
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 654 830
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Approximately 5,600 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with ALS each year. The incidence of ALS is two per 100,000 people, and it is estimated that as many as 30,000 Americans may have the disease at any given time. There are no effective therapies of ALS to-date. Recent genetic discoveries have pinpointed mutations that lead to the aberrant function of two proteins that bind to RNA transcripts in neurons. Misregulation of these RNA binding proteins is responsible for the aberrant levels and processing of hundreds of RNA representing genes that are important for neuronal survival and function. In this proposal, we will use neurons generated from patient cells that harbor the mutations in these RNA binding proteins to (1) prioritize a RNA “signature” unique to neurons suffering from the toxic function of these proteins and (2) as an abundant source of raw material to enable high-throughput screens of drug-like compounds that will bypass the mutations in the proteins and “correct” the RNA signature to resemble that of a healthy neuron. If successful, our unconventional approach that uses hundreds of parallel measurements of specific RNA events, will identify drugs that will treat ALS patients.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Our research aims to develop drug-like compounds that are aimed to treat Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), which may be applicable to other neurological diseases that heavily impact Californians, such as Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The cellular resources and genomic assays that we are developing in this research will have great potential for future research and can be applied to other disease areas. The cells, in particular will be beneficial to California health care patients, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries in terms of improved human models for drug discovery and toxicology testing. Our improved knowledge base will support our efforts as well as other Californian researchers to study stem cell models of neurological disease and design new diagnostics and treatments, thereby maintaining California's position as a leader in clinical research.
Progress Report: 
  • Our research aims to develop drug-like compounds that are aimed to treat Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), which may be applicable to other neurological diseases that heavily impact Californians, such as Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. In the first year, we have succeeded in improving the efficiency of motor neuron differentiation to generate high-quality motor neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells. We have generated RNA signatures from motor neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells from normal, healthy individuals whereby key proteins implicated in ALS are depleted using RNAi technology. We have also generated motor neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells that contained mutations in these key proteins and are in the process of applying genomic technologies to compare these cells to ones where we have depleted the proteins themselves. In parallel, we have started to optimize conditions for a small molecule screen to identify previously FDA-approved compounds that may alter aberrant and ALS-associated phenotypes in human cell lines.

Stem Cell-Derived Astrocyte Precursor Transplants in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Research I
Grant Number: 
DR1-01471
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$5 694 308
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a lethal disease lacking effective treatments, is characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons. 5-10% of ALS is familial, but the majority of ALS cases are sporadic with unknown causes. The lifetime risk is approximately 1 in 2000. This corresponds to ~30,000 affected individuals in the United States and ~5000 in the Collaborative Funding Partner country. There is currently only one FDA-approved compound, Rilutek, that extends lifespan by a maximum of three months. Although the causes of ALS are unknown and the presentation of the disease highly variable, common to all forms of ALS is the significant loss of motor neurons leading to muscle weakness, paralysis, respiratory failure and ultimately death. It is likely that many pathways are affected in the disease and focusing on a single pathway may have limited impact on survival. In addition, as ALS is diagnosed at a time that significant cell loss has occurred, an attempt to spare further cell loss would have significant impact on survival. Several findings support the approach of glial (cells surrounding the motor neurons) transplants. Despite the relative selectivity of motor neuron cell death in ALS, published studies demonstrate that glial transporters critical for the appropriate balance of glutamate surrounding the motor neurons are affected both in animal models and in tissue from sporadic and familial ALS. The significance of non-neuronal cells in the disease process has been well characterized using SOD1 mouse models representing many of the key aspects of the human disease. In addition, transplantation using glial-restricted precursors (GRPs) that differentiate into astrocytes in SOD1 mutant rats has been shown to increase survival. Motor neurons have a process, the axon, up to a meter in length which connects the cell body to its target, the muscle. The ability to appropriately rewire and ensure functional connections after motor neuron replacement remains a daunting task with no evidence to date that this will be possible in humans. Therefore, we will focus on the development of an ALS therapy based on hES-derived astrocyte precursor cell transplants to prevent the progression of ALS. Our proposed project will develop clinical grade stem-cell derived astrocyte precursor transplants for therapy in a prospective Phase I clinical trial. We will: 1) generate astrocyte precursors from three different sources of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines; 2) identify the hESC line and glial progenitor combination that has the best characteristics of minimal toxicity, best efficiency in generating astrocytes, and reducing disease phenotypes in vivo in a rat model of ALS; 3) manufacture the appropriate cells in a GMP facility required by the FDA; 4) work with our established clinical team to design a Phase I safety trial; and 5) submit an application for an invesitgational new drug (IND) within the next four years.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease) is a common and devastating adult motor neuron disease that afflicts many Californians. In the absence of a cure, or an effective treatment, the cost of caring for patients with ALS is substantial, and the consequences on friends and family members similarly takes a devastating toll. Our goal is to develop a safe and effective cell transplant therapy for ALS by starting with human embryonic stem cells. If successful, this advance will hopefully diminish the cost of caring for the many Californians with ALS, extend their useful lives, and improve their quality of life. In addition, the development of this type of therapeutic approach in California will serve as an important proof of principle and stimulate the formation of businesses that seek to develop these types of therapies in California with consequent economic benefit.
Progress Report: 
  • Considerable progress was made on transitioning cells and cell production methods from research-scale to translational/clinical scale. Specifically, Year 1 activities were focused on transitioning from research to pilot-scale cell production methods, and characterization of the animal amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) disease model. These activities were essential because cellular therapy development is a multi-stage process with increasing stringency over time in terms of the increased focus on the details of the methods, stringent requirements for reagents/materials, greater scale, and more thorough product characterization during the transition from early research to an approved cellular therapy.
  • During Year 1, small-scale embryonic stem cell (ESC) growth and differentiation methods previously developed for research at Life Technologies were further developed at a larger pilot-scale, which provided enough cells to perform early animal pre-clinical studies and cell characterization. In addition to the increased scale of cell production, where possible, research grade reagents and materials were substituted with reagents and materials that would be required or preferred for producing a cell therapy for use in humans [produced under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), non-animal origin, well characterized]. These conditions are not ideal for many ESC lines, and only 1 of the 4 starting ESC lines was able to adapt successfully to these culture conditions. To increase the number of potential clinical ESC candidate cell lines, we acquired 2 additional ESC lines, UCFB6 and UCSFB7 from the University of California, San Francisco. Development is ongoing to ensure the cell processing methods are robust and scalable for the increased cell numbers required for the large-scale animal studies in Year 2. Cells from the pilot-scale production are being subjected to deep sequencing as part of the development of molecular characterization methods that may provide future quality control assays.
  • During Year 1, further studies of a rat ALS disease model were performed to: 1) optimize cell injection methods; 2) improve characterization of disease onset and progression in the rat model; 3) evaluate the utility of behavioral and electrophysiology tests for following the disease; and 4) evaluate histology methods for measuring neuron damage and detection of implanted cells, which will be used to optimize the large-scale efficacy studies planned for Year 2. We discovered that several time-consuming analysis approaches for efficacy evaluation could be replaced by simpler, more cost effective approaches. Additionally, the Year 1 studies tested and ensured that the team could handle an aggressive cell implant schedule, twice daily immunosuppression, demanding behavioral and electrophysiology assessments, and extensive histology evaluations.
  • Considerable progress was made on transitioning cells and cell production methods from research-scale to translational/clinical scale, including initial cell production in a GMP facility with GMP compatible production methods. Additionally, extensive characterization of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) disease animal model was completed and cells were evaluated for potential efficacy in this ALS disease animal model. These activities are key for continued progress in cellular therapy development, which is a multi-stage process that requires increasing focus on the details of the methods, stringent requirements for reagents/materials, greater scale, and more thorough product characterization during the transition to an approved cellular therapy.
  • Specifically, we made significant progress in three major areas:
  • First, we found evidence for efficacy using neural stem cells made at Life Technologies. In brief, during Year 1, the rat ALS disease model was shown to be a more aggressive disease model with an earlier disease onset and more rapid progression to end-stage and death than the model that had been used in previous studies. During Year 2, this more aggressive ALS disease model was further characterized with the identification of a reliable marker of disease onset, and demonstration that alpha motor neuron sparing by implanted cells could be detected and measured even, despite the aggressive nature of disease progression in this rat model.
  • We found that H9 NSCs produced by Life Technologies, when implanted into the rat ALS disease model, survived, migrated extensively into the area where alpha motor neurons are located, differentiated into cells that appear to be astrocytes, and provided a protective effect for the alpha motor neurons. This protective effect was determined by comparing the survival of alpha motor neurons on the side of the rat spinal cord where NSCs were implanted with the side of the spinal cord that did not have cells implanted. The side of the spinal cord where the NSCs were implanted showed approximately 10% more surviving alpha motor neurons than the matching side of the spinal cord that did not have cells implanted.
  • Second, cells from the various production methods were subjected to gene sequencing as part of the development of molecular characterization methods. This sequencing information was critical to identify whether cells produced by various methods were typical for the cell type, or exhibited qualities that indicated they were not optimal cell populations. These methods will be used to identify optimal markers for characterizing cell populations as part of current cell production development and for future quality control assays.
  • Third, during Year 2, Life Technologies further developed their pilot-scale embryonic stem cell (ESC) growth and differentiation methods to be more easily adaptable to cell production under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP). This involved increasing the scale of cell production, and where possible, substituting reagent grade reagents and materials with reagents and materials that would be required or preferred for producing a cell therapy for use in humans (produced GMP, non-animal origin, well characterized). These conditions are not ideal for many ESC lines, and in Year 1, only one (H9) of the 4 starting ESC lines was successfully adapted to these culture conditions, however, 3 additional ESC lines were acquired to increase the number of potential clinical ESC candidate cell lines. One of these ESC lines (UCSFB7 from the University of California, San Francisco) was successfully adapted to the pilot ESC culture conditions, and resulted in the production of NSCs, and with AP production in progress. Because the research version of ESC line H9 has been used to successfully produce NSCs at Life Technologies, agreements are in progress for City of Hope for NSC cell production using the H9 ESCs, that have been banked under GMP conditions at City of Hope. In addition, pilot-scale cell production was initiated earlier than originally planned at the University of California, Davis GMP facility. The plan is to produce NSCs and APs under conditions that UC Davis has found to be successful in the past, and transition these methods to GMP compliance. To date, UC Davis has produced ESCs from 3 ESC lines [UCSF4, UCSF4.2 (a.k.a. UCSFB6) and UCSF4.3 (a.k.a. UCSFB7] and has produced NSCs from ESC line UCSF4. The UCSF4 NSCs are scheduled to be shipped to UCSD for testing in the ALS disease animal model in early June, 2012, and NSC production from ESC lines UCSF4.2 and UCSF4.3 is expected to begin in late June 2012.

Stem Cell-Derived Astrocyte Precursor Transplants in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Funding Type: 
Early Translational from Disease Team Conversion
Grant Number: 
TRX-01471
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$4 139 754
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a lethal disease lacking effective treatments, is characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons. 5-10% of ALS is familial, but the majority of ALS cases are sporadic with unknown causes. The lifetime risk is approximately 1 in 2000. This corresponds to ~30,000 affected individuals in the United States and ~5000 in the Collaborative Funding Partner country. There is currently only one FDA-approved compound, Rilutek, that extends lifespan by a maximum of three months. Although the causes of ALS are unknown and the presentation of the disease highly variable, common to all forms of ALS is the significant loss of motor neurons leading to muscle weakness, paralysis, respiratory failure and ultimately death. It is likely that many pathways are affected in the disease and focusing on a single pathway may have limited impact on survival. In addition, as ALS is diagnosed at a time that significant cell loss has occurred, an attempt to spare further cell loss would have significant impact on survival. Several findings support the approach of glial (cells surrounding the motor neurons) transplants. Despite the relative selectivity of motor neuron cell death in ALS, published studies demonstrate that glial transporters critical for the appropriate balance of glutamate surrounding the motor neurons are affected both in animal models and in tissue from sporadic and familial ALS. The significance of non-neuronal cells in the disease process has been well characterized using SOD1 mouse models representing many of the key aspects of the human disease. In addition, transplantation using glial-restricted precursors (GRPs) that differentiate into astrocytes in SOD1 mutant rats has been shown to increase survival. Motor neurons have a process, the axon, up to a meter in length which connects the cell body to its target, the muscle. The ability to appropriately rewire and ensure functional connections after motor neuron replacement remains a daunting task with no evidence to date that this will be possible in humans. Therefore, we will focus on the development of an ALS therapy based on hES-derived astrocyte precursor cell transplants to prevent the progression of ALS. Our proposed project will develop clinical grade stem-cell derived astrocyte precursor transplants for therapy in a prospective Phase I clinical trial. We will: 1) generate astrocyte precursors from three different sources of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines; 2) identify the hESC line and glial progenitor combination that has the best characteristics of minimal toxicity, best efficiency in generating astrocytes, and reducing disease phenotypes in vivo in a rat model of ALS; 3) manufacture the appropriate cells in a GMP facility required by the FDA; 4) work with our established clinical team to design a Phase I safety trial; and 5) submit an application for an invesitgational new drug (IND) within the next four years.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease) is a common and devastating adult motor neuron disease that afflicts many Californians. In the absence of a cure, or an effective treatment, the cost of caring for patients with ALS is substantial, and the consequences on friends and family members similarly takes a devastating toll. Our goal is to develop a safe and effective cell transplant therapy for ALS by starting with human embryonic stem cells. If successful, this advance will hopefully diminish the cost of caring for the many Californians with ALS, extend their useful lives, and improve their quality of life. In addition, the development of this type of therapeutic approach in California will serve as an important proof of principle and stimulate the formation of businesses that seek to develop these types of therapies in California with consequent economic benefit.
Progress Report: 
  • Project Description and Rationale:
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult motor neuron disease, affecting 30,000 people in the US and the typical age of onset is in the mid-50s or slightly younger. ALS is a degenerative neural disease in which the damage and death of neurons results in progressive loss of the body’s functions until death, which is usually in 3-5 years of diagnosis. Current ALS treatments are primarily supportive, and providing excellent clinical care is essential for patients with ALS; however, there is an urgent need for treatments that significantly change the disease course. The only Food and Drug Administration approved, disease-specific medication for treatment of ALS is Rilutek (riluzole); which demonstrated only a modest effect on survival (up to 3 months) in clinical trials.
  • The ALS Disease Team/Early Translational project is focused on developing an ALS therapy based on human embryonic stem cell (ESC) derived neural stem cells (NSC) and/or astrocyte precursor cells transplanted into the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Several lines of evidence strongly support the approach of transplanting cells that exhibit the capacity to migrate, proliferate and mature into normal healthy astrocytes which can provide a neuroprotective effect for motor neurons and reduce or prevent neural damage and disease progression in ALS. Strong evidence has been generated from extensive studies in culture dishes and in animal models to support the concept that providing normal astrocytes in the proximity of α-motor neurons can protect them from neural damage.
  • Project Plan and Progress:
  • Multiple ESC lines were acquired in 2 rounds based on early and later availability. The first round of ESCs included ESCs from City of Hope (GMP H9) and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF4). The second round included ESCs from the University of California, San Francisco [UCSFB6 (aka UCSF4.2) and UCSFB7 (aka UCSF4.3)] and from BioTime (ESI-017). These ESC lines were tested for their ability to survive and expand under conditions required for producing a cellular therapy (FDA GMP-like and GTP compliant conditions). From these ESC lines, NSCs were generated, expanded and characterized to determine their ability to produce stable and consistent populations of NSCs under conditions required for producing a cellular therapy.
  • For the first round of cell lines, both UCSF4 and H9 were successfully induced to produce NSCs, which were mechanically enriched, expanded and implanted into immunodeficient rats and a rat model of ALS (SOD1G93A). For this small-scale in vivo screen, implanted UCSF4 and H9 NSCs survived, migrated and differentiated into neurons and astrocytic cells in 3-5 weeks, without producing tumors or other unwanted structures. NSCs from both UCSF4 and H9 performed similarly in culture and in vivo, thus the decision to use UCSF4 in the larger-scale in vivo studies for safety (implant into immunodeficient rats) and efficacy/proof of concept (SOD1G93A ALS model rats) was weighted by the difficulties obtaining H9 for future studies for a therapeutic product. These larger-scale studies began August 2013 (earlier than projected), with expected completion in February 2014.
  • For the second round of ESC lines (UCSFB6, UCSFB7 and BioTime ESI-017), UCSFB6 and UCSFB7 ESCs expanded well, while ESI-017 expansion was less robust. Because UCSFB6 and UCSFB7 ESCs are from the same blastomere, we decided to continue to NSC production with only UCSFB7, keeping UCSFB6 in reserve as a back-up. UCSFB7 ESCs were successfully induced to produce NSCs, which were mechanically enriched, expanded and implanted into immunodeficient rats and a rat model of ALS (SOD1G93A). The results from these studies are pending (some animals are still in-life), but early histology suggests the cell survival is similar to UCSF4 and H9. A second round of large-scale in vivo studies is planned to start January 2014 to evaluate this NSC line. By September 2014, the “best” NSC line will be selected as a therapeutic candidate for definitive pre-clinical studies and entry into clinical trials.
  • ESC production under GMP-like condition has been completed at the UC Davis GMP facility. UC Davis generated the first batch of NSCs, which were not sufficiently homogeneous for successful expansion beyond approximately passage 10. This prompted UCSD to investigate multiple enrichment strategies, which were tested on multiple cell lines to ensure method reproducibility. A mechanical enrichment method reproducibly resulted in more homogeneous NSC cultures, capable of expansion for 20 – 30 passages, or more. The NSC generation and enrichment methods are currently being transferred to UC Davis and the UCSD scientist who developed the methods will work side-by-side with the UC Davis GMP production team to ensure successful method transfer to the GMP facility.
  • UCSF4 NSCs are also in use in a CIRM supported early translation study for spinal cord injury.

Elucidating pathways from hereditary Alzheimer mutations to pathological tau phenotypes

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-07011
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 161 000
Disease Focus: 
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
We propose to elucidate pathways of genes that lead from early causes to later defects in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), which is common, fatal, and for which no effective disease-modifying drugs are available. Because no effective AD treatment is available or imminent, we propose to discover novel genetic pathways by screening purified human brain cells made from human reprogrammed stem cells (human IPS cells or hIPSC) from patients that have rare and aggressive hereditary forms of AD. We have already discovered that such human brain cells exhibit an unique biochemical behavior that indicates early development of AD in a dish. Thus, we hope to find new drug targets by using the new tools of human stem cells that were previously unavailable. We think that human brain cells in a dish will succeed where animal models and other types of cells have thus far failed.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that afflicts millions of Californians. The emotional and financial impact on families and on the state healthcare budget is enormous. This project seeks to find new drug targets to treat this terrible disease. If we are successful our work in the long-term may help diminish the social and familial cost of AD, and lead to establishment of new businesses in California using our approaches.

Molecular basis of plasma membrane characteristics reflecting stem cell fate potential

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-07254
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 003 590
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Stem cells generate mature, functional cells after proteins on the cell surface interact with cues from the environment encountered during development or after transplantation. Thus, these cell surface proteins are critical for directing transplanted stem cells to form appropriate cells to treat injury or disease. A key modification regulating cell surface proteins is glycosylation, which is the addition of sugars onto proteins and has not been well studied in neural stem cells. We focus on a major unsolved problem in the neural stem cell field: do different proteins coated with sugars on the surfaces of cells in this lineage (neuron precursors, NPs and astrocyte precursors, APs) determine what types of mature cells will form? We hypothesize key players directing cellular decisions are glycosylated proteins controlling how precursors respond to extracellular cues. We will address this hypothesis with aims investigating whether (1) glycosylation pathways predicted to affect cell surface proteins differ between NPs and APs, (2) glycosylated proteins on the surface of NPs and APs serve as instructive cues governing fate or merely mark their fate potential, and (3) glycosylation pathways regulate cell surface proteins likely to affect fate choice. By answering these questions we will better understand the formation of NPs and APs, which will improve the use of these cells to treat brain and spinal cord diseases and injuries.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The goal of this project is to determine how cell surface proteins differ between cells in the neural lineage that form two types of final, mature cells (neurons and astrocytes) in the brain and spinal cord. In the course of these studies, we will uncover specific properties of human stem cells that are used to treat neurological diseases and injuries. We expect this knowledge will improve the use of these cells in transplants by enabling more control over what type of mature cell will be formed from transplanted cells. Also, cells that specifically generate either neurons or astrocytes can be used for drug testing, which will help to predict the effects of compounds on cells in the human brain. We hope our research will greatly improve identification, isolation, and utility of specific types of human neural stem cells for treatment of human conditions. Furthermore, this project will generate new jobs for high-skilled workers and, hopefully, intellectual property that will contribute to the economic growth of California.

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