Neurological Disorders

Coding Dimension ID: 
303
Coding Dimension path name: 
Neurological Disorders

New Chemokine-Derived Therapeutics Targeting Stem Cell Migration

Funding Type: 
SEED Grant
Grant Number: 
RS1-00225
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$759 000
Disease Focus: 
Spinal Cord Injury
Neurological Disorders
Stroke
Trauma
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
This proposal describes a sharply-focused, timely, and rigorous effort to develop new therapies for the treatment of injuries of the Central Nervous System (CNS). The underlying hypothesis for this proposal is that chemokines and their receptors (particularly those involved in inflammatory cascades) actually play important roles in mediating the directed migration of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) to, as well as engagement and interaction with, sites of CNS injury, and that understanding and manipulating the molecular mechanism of chemokine-mediated stem cell homing and engagement will lead to new, better targeted, more specific, and more efficacious chemokine-mediated stem cell-based repair strategies for CNS injury. In recent preliminary studies, we have discovered and demonstrated the important role of chemokine SDF-1-alpha and its receptor CXCR4 in mediating the directed migration of hNSCs to sites of CNS injury. To manipulate this SDF-1-alpha/CXCR4 pathway in stem cell migration, we have developed Synthetically and Modularly Modified Chemokines (SMM-chemokines) as highly potent and specific therapeutic leads. Here in this renewal application we propose to extend our research into a new area of stem cell biology and medicine involving chemokine receptors such as CXCR4 and its ligand SDF-1. Specifically, we will design more potent and specific analogs of SDF-1-alpha to direct the migration of beneficial stem cells toward the injury sites for the repair process.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This proposal describes a sharply-focused, timely, and rigorous effort to develop new therapies for the treatment of injuries of the Central Nervous System (CNS). CNS injuries and related disorders such as stroke, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury are significant health issues in the nation including the state of California. The new stem cell-based therapies to be developed from this application will have important clinical application in patients with these diseases in California.
Progress Report: 
  • Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) expressing CXCR4 have been found to migrate in vivo toward an infarcted area that are representative of central nervous system (CNS) injuries, where local reactive astrocytes and vascular endothelium up-regulate the SDF-1α secretion level and generate a concentration gradient. Exposure of hNSCs to SDF-1α and the consequent induction of CXCR4-mediated signaling triggers a series of intracellular processes associated with fundamental aspects of survival, proliferation and more importantly, proper lamination and migration during the early stages of brain development [1]. To date, there is no crystal structure available for chemokine receptors [2, 3]. Structural and modeling studies of SDF-1α and D-(1~10)-L-(11~69)-vMIP-II in complexes with CXCR4 TM helical regions led us to a plausible “two-pocket” model for CXCR4 interaction with agonists or antagonists. [4-6] In this study, we extended the employment of this model into the novel design strategy for highly potent and selective CXCR4 agonist molecules, with potentials in activating CXCR4-mediated hNSC migration by mimicking a benign version of the proinflamatory signal triggered by SDF-1α. Successful verification of directed, extensive migration of hNSCs, both in vitro and in transplanted uninjured adult mouse brains, with the latter manifesting significant advantages over the natural CXCR4 agonist SDF-1α in terms of both distribution and stability in mouse brains, strongly supports the effectiveness and high potentials of these de novo designed CXCR4 agonist molecules in optimizing directed migration of transplanted human stem cells during the reparative therapeutics for a broad range of neurodegenerative diseases in a more foreseeable future.
  • Our final progress report is divided into 3 subsections, each addressing progress in the 3 fundamental areas of investigation for the successful completion of this project:
  • (1) De-novo design and synthesis of CXCR4-specific SDF-1α analogs.
  • (2) In vitro studies on validating biological potencies of molecules in (1) in activating CXCR4 down-stream signaling.
  • (3) In vivo studies on migration of transplanted neural precursor cells (NPCs) in co-administration of molecules with validated biological activities in (2).

Identifying small molecules that stimulate the differentiation of hESCs into dopamine-producing neurons

Funding Type: 
SEED Grant
Grant Number: 
RS1-00215
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$564 309
Disease Focus: 
Parkinson's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
In this application, we propose to identify small molecule compounds that can stimulate human embryonic stem cells to become dopamine-producing neurons. These neurons degenerate in Parkinson’s disease, and currently have very limited availability, thus hindering the cell replacement therapy for treating Parkinson’s disease. Our proposed research, if successful, will lead to the identification of small molecule compounds that can not only stimulate cultured human embryonic stem cells to become DA neurons, but may also stimulate endogenous brain stem cells to regenerate, since the small molecule compounds can be made readily available to the brain due to their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. In addition, these small molecule compounds may serve as important research tools, which can tell us the fundamental biology of the human embryonic stem cells.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The proposed research will potentially lead to a cure for the devastating neurodegenerative, movement disorder, Parkinson’s disease. The proposed research will potentially provide important research tools to better understand hESCs. Such improved understanding of hESCs may lead to better treatments for a variety of diseases, in which a stem-cell based therapy could make a difference.
Progress Report: 
  • Parkinson’s disease is the most common movement disorder due to the degeneration of brain dopaminergic neurons. One strategy to combat the disease is to replenish these neurons in the patients, either through transplantation of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons, or through promoting endogenous dopaminergic neuronal production or survival. We have carried out a small molecule based screen to identify compounds that can affect the development and survival of dopaminergic neurons from pluripotent stem cells. The small molecules that we have identified will not only serve as important research tools for understanding dopaminergic neuron development and survival, but potentially could also lead to therapeutics in the induction of dopaminergic neurons for treating Parkinson’s disease.

Generation of forebrain neurons from human embryonic stem cells

Funding Type: 
SEED Grant
Grant Number: 
RS1-00205
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$612 075
Disease Focus: 
Aging
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
The goal of this proposal is to generate forebrain neurons from human embryonic stem cells. Our general strategy is to sequentially expose ES cells to signals that lead to differentiation along a neuronal lineage, and to select for cells that display characteristics of forebrain neurons. These cells would then be used in transplantation experiments to determine if they are able to make synaptic connections with host neurons. If successful these experiments would provide a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other disorders that are characterized by loss of forebrain neurons. Currently there is no effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, and with an aging baby-boomer population, the incidence of this disease is likely to increase sharply. One of the few promising avenues to treat Alzheimer’s is the possibility of cell replacement therapy in which the neurons lost could be replaced by transplanted neurons. Embryonic stem cells, which have the ability to differentiate into various cells of the body, could be a key component of such a therapy if we can successfully differentiate them into forebrain neurons.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Alzheimer’s disease is a devastating sporadic neurological disorder that places all of us at risk. As the California population ages, there will be a significant increase in the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease, and the medical and financial cost on the state will be severe. There are currently no effective treatments for this disorder, and one of the few promises is the possibility of transplantation therapy to replace the neurons that are lost in the disease. Being able to generate forebrain neurons from human embryonic stem cells would provide a key tool in the fight against this disease. Needless to say, the development of an effective cell replacement therapy would not only be of immense medical significance as we care for our senior population, it will also greatly relieve the financial burden associated with the care of Alzheimer’s patients, which is often borne by the state.
Progress Report: 
  • The goal of this proposal was to generate forebrain neurons from human embryonic stem cells. Our general strategy was to sequentially expose ES cells to signals that would lead the cells to acquire characteristics typical of differentiated brain cells that are lost in disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease. The most important advance of the research was our ability to achieve this goal. We now have a well-developed protocol that can be used to generate forebrain cells in culture. We have found that these cells not only express genes typical of these cells, they extend axons and dendrites and can make synaptic connections. These cells could be very useful for transplantation studies, as well as for developing cell culture models of Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we have discovered that the same protocol is effective in generating forebrain neurons from iPS cells, attesting to the general usefulness of this strategy.

In vitro differentiation of hESCs into corticospinal motor neurons

Funding Type: 
SEED Grant
Grant Number: 
RS1-00170
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$500 000
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressive, fatal neurological disease that leads to the degeneration of motor neurons in the brain and in the spinal cord. There are currently 20,000 ALS patients in the United States, and 5,000 new patients are diagnosed every year. Unfortunately no cure has been found for ALS. The only medication approved by the FDA to treat ALS can only slow the disease’s progression and prolong life by a few months in some patients. Thus it is critical to explore other therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ALS such as cell replacement strategy. Because of the ability to generate many different cell types, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) may potentially serve as a renewable source of cells for replacing the damaged cells in diseases. However, transplanting ESCs directly may cause tumor growth in patients. To support cell transplants, it is important to develop methods to differentiate hESCs into the specific cell types affected by the disease. In this application, we propose to develop an effective method to differentiate hESCs into corticospinal motor neurons (CSMNs), the neurons in the cerebral cortex that degenerate in ALS. We will test whether these CSMNs generated from hESCs in culture conditions can form proper connections to the spinal cord when transplanted into mouse brains. To direct hESCs to become the CSMNs, it is critical to establish a reliable method to identify human CSMNs. Recent progress in developmental neuroscience have identified genes that are specifically expressed in the CSMNs in mice. However no information is available for identifying human CSMNs. We hypothesize that CSMN genes in mice will be reliable markers for human CSMNs. To test this hypothesis we will investigate whether mouse CSMN markers are specifically expressed in the human CSMNs. The therapeutic application of hESCs to replace damaged CSMNs in ALS depends on the ability to direct hESCs to develop into CSMNs. Currently a reliable condition to direct hESCs to differentiate into CSMNs has not been established. We will attempt to differentiate hESCs into CSMNs based on the knowledge gained from studying the development of nervous system. We will achieve this goal in two steps: first we will culture hESCs in a condition to make them become progenitors cells of the most anterior region of the brain; then we will culture these progenitors to become neurons of the cerebral cortex, particularly the CSMNs. We will study the identities of these neurons using the CSMN markers that we have proposed to identify. To apply the cell replacement strategy to treat ALS, it will be critical to test if human CSMNs generated from cultured hESCs can form proper connections in an animal model. We will transplant the CSMNs developed from hESCs into the brains of mice and test whether they can form connections to the spinal cord. When carried out, the proposed research will directly benefit cell replacement therapy for ALS.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressive, fatal neurological disease that leads to the degeneration of motor neurons in the brain and in the spinal cord. There are currently 20,000 ALS patients in the United States, and 5,000 new patients are diagnosed every year. Unfortunately no cure has been found for ALS. The only medication approved by the FDA to treat ALS can only slow the disease’s progression and prolong life by a few months in some patients. Thus it is critical to explore other therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ALS such as cell replacement strategy. Because of the ability to generate many different types of cells, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) may potentially serve as a renewable source of cells for replacing the damaged cells in diseases. However, transplanting ESCs directly may cause tumor growth in patients. To support cell transplants, it is important to develop methods to differentiate hESCs into the specific cell types affected by the disease. In this application, we propose to develop an effective method to differentiate hESCs into corticospinal motor neurons (CSMNs), the neurons in the cerebral cortex that degenerate in ALS. We will test whether these CSMNs generated from hESCs in culture conditions can form proper connections to the spinal cord when transplanted into mouse brains. Everyday, 15 people die from ALS. For patients diagnozied with ALS, time is running out very fast. It is critical to explore novel therapeutic strategies for this rapidly progressive and fatal disease. The research proposed in this application may provide the basis for a novel cell replacement therapy for ALS, thus it will greatly benefit the State of California and everyone in the State.
Progress Report: 
  • Corticospinal motor neurons are affected in motor neuron diseases and damaged in spinal cord injuries. In this grant application, we proposed to induce human embryonic stem cells to generate corticospinal motor neurons. In this past grant period, we have generated neurons that express the corticospinal motor neuron genes. We are currently characterizing the cell types of theses neurons in detail. In the near future we will transplant them into the brains in mice to test whether they can form functional neural circuits.
  • In the past grant period, we have been continuing to generate brain neurons from cultured human embryonic stems. We have been determining what types of neurons are generated using our protocol. We are testing the functions of these neurons.

Progenitor Cells Secreting GDNF for the Treatment of ALS

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Development - Research
Grant Number: 
DR2A-05320
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$17 842 617
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
This project aims to use a powerful combined neural progenitor cell and growth factor approach to treat patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease). ALS is a devastating disease for which there is no treatment or cure. Progression from early muscle twitches to complete paralysis and death usually happens within 4 years. Every 90 minutes someone is diagnosed with ALS in the USA, and every 90 minutes someone dies from ALS. In California the death rate is one person every one and a half days. Human neural progenitor cells found early in brain development can be isolated and expanded in culture to large banks of billions of cell. When transplanted into animal models of ALS they have been shown to mature into support cells for dying motor neurons called astrocytes. In other studies, growth factors such as glial cell line-derived growth factor (or GDNF) have been shown to protect motor neurons from damage in a number of different animal models including ALS. However, delivering GDNF to the spinal cord has been almost impossible as it does not cross from the blood to the tissue of the spinal cord. The idea behind the current proposal is to modify human neural progenitor cells to produce GDNF and then transplant these cells into patients. There they act as “Trojan horses”, arriving at sick motor neurons and delivering the drug exactly where it is needed. A number of advances in human neural progenitor cell biology along with new surgical approaches have allowed us to create this disease team approach. The focus of the proposal will be to perform essential preclinical studies in relevant preclinical animal models that will establish optimal doses and safe procedures for translating this progenitor cell and growth factor therapy into human patients. The Phase 1/2a clinical study will inject the cells into one side of the lumbar spinal cord (that supplies the legs with neural impulses) of 12 ALS patients from the state of California. The progression in the treated leg vs. the non treated leg will be compared to see if the cells slow down progression of the disease. This is the first time a combined progenitor cell and growth factor treatment has been explored for patients with ALS.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
ALS is a devastating disease, and also puts a large burden on state resources through the need of full time care givers and hospital equipment. It is estimated that the cost of caring for an ALS patient in the late stage of disease while on a respiration is $200,000-300,000 per year. While primarily a humanitarian effort to avoid suffering, this project will also ease the cost of caring for ALS patients in California if ultimately successful. As the first trial in the world to combine progenitor cell and gene transfer of a growth factor, it will make California a center of excellence for these types of studies. This in turn will attract scientists, clinicians, and companies interested in this area of medicine to the state of California thus increasing state revenue and state prestige in the rapidly growing field of Regenerative Medicine.
Progress Report: 
  • ALS is a devastating disease for which there is no treatment or cure. Death of motor neurons in the spinal cord responsible for muscle function, results in complete paralysis and death usually within 2-4 years following diagnosis. This project will transplant stem cells secreting the powerful growth factor GDNF into the spinal cord of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease) do delay motor neuron death and thus treat the disease. In the first year we have (i) put together an outstanding team that have been able to begin the process of all pre clinical studies required to reach a new investigational drug (IND) filing within two years, (ii) generated a bank of research grade neural stem cells producing GDNF and developed manufacturing protocols at clinical grad level to produce the final lot of cells for the trial, (iii) performed complete dose ranging studies in a rat model of ALS to generate the first set of data showing safety and optimal doses for the cell product, (iv) optimized parameters to perform small and large animal safety studies required to take this work to the clinic and (v) assembled an outstanding team of clinicians and developed a world leading ALS clinic that is now preparing for patients to enter this trial. In the next year, we hope to complete the clinical grade lot of stem cells producing GDNF, to complete the remaining safety studies in rodent and pigs that will allow us to submit the IND application enabling a Phase 1/2a clinical study in 18 ALS patients from the state of California.

Neural stem cell transplantation for chronic cervical spinal cord injury

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Development - Research
Grant Number: 
DR2A-05736
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$20 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Spinal Cord Injury
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
1.3 million Americans suffer chronically from spinal cord injuries (SCI); each year ~15,000 individuals sustain a new injury. For California, this means nearly 147,000 individuals are living with a SCI which can leave otherwise healthy individuals with severe deficits in movement, sensation, and autonomic function. Recovery after SCI is often limited, even after aggressive emergency treatment with steroids and surgery, followed by rehabilitation. The need to develop new treatments for SCI is pressing. We believe that stem cell therapies could provide significant functional recovery, improve quality of life, and reduce the cost of care for SCI patients. The goal of this Disease Team is to evaluate a novel cell therapy approach to SCI involving transplantation of human neural stem cells. In 2005, the FDA authorized the world’s first clinical testing of human neural stem cell transplantation into the CNS. Since then, our research team has successfully generated clinical grade human neural stem cells for use in three clinical trials, established a favorable safety profile that now approaches five years in some subjects and includes evidence of long-term donor-cell survival. Relevant to this Disease Team, the most recent study began testing human neural stem cells in thoracic spinal cord injury. The initial group of three patients with complete injury has been successfully transplanted. The Disease Team seeks to extend the research into cervical SCI. Neural cell transplantation holds tremendous promise for achieving spinal cord repair. In preliminary experiments, the investigators on this Disease Team showed that transplantation of both murine and human neural stem cells into animal models of SCI restore motor function. The human neural stem cells migrate extensively within the spinal cord from the injection site, promoting new myelin and synapse formation that lead to axonal repair and synaptic integrity. Given these promising proof-of-concept studies, we propose to manufacture clinical-grade human neural stem cells and execute the preclinical studies required to submit an IND application to the FDA that will support the first-in-human neural stem cell transplantation trial for cervical SCI. Our unmatched history of three successful regulatory submissions, extensive experience in manufacturing, preclinical and clinical studies of human neural stem cells for neurologic disorders, combined with an outstanding team of basic and clinical investigators with expertise in SCI, stem cell biology, and familiarity with all the steps of clinical translation, make us an extremely competitive applicant for CIRM’s Disease Team awards. This award could ultimately lead to a successful FDA submission that will permit human testing of a new treatment approach for SCI; one that could potentially reverse paralysis and improve the patient’s quality of life.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Spinal cord injuries affect more than 147,000 Californians; the majority are injuries to the cervical level (neck region) of the spinal cord. SCI exacts a devastating toll not only on patients and families, but also results in a heavy economic impact on the state: the lifetime medical costs for an individual with a SCI can exceed $3.3 million, not including the loss of wages and productivity. In California this translates to roughly $86 billion in healthcare costs. Currently there are no approved therapies for chronic thoracic or cervical SCI. We hope to advance our innovative cell therapy approach to treat patients who suffer cervical SCI. For the past 9 years, the assembled team (encompassing academic experts in pre-clinical SCI models, complications due to SCI, rehabilitation and industry experts in manufacturing and delivery of purified neural stem cells), has developed the appropriate SCI models and assays to elucidate the therapeutic potential of human neural stem cells for SCI repair. Human neural stem cell transplantation holds the promise of creating a new treatment paradigm. These cells restored motor function in spinal cord injured animal models. Our therapeutic approach is based on the hypothesis that transplanted human neural stem cells mature into oligodendrocytes to remyelinate demyelinated axons, and/or form neurons to repair local spinal circuitry. Any therapy that can partially reverse some of the sequelae of SCI could substantially change the quality-of-life for patients by altering their dependence on assisted living, medical care and possibly restoring productive employment. Through CIRM, California has emerged as a worldwide leader in stem cell research and development. If successful, this project would further CIRM’s mission and increase California’s prominence while providing SCI therapy to injured Californians. This Team already has an established track record in stem cell clinical translation. The success of this Disease Team application would also facilitate new job creation in highly specialized areas including cell manufacturing making California a unique training ground. In summary, the potential benefit to the state of California brought by a cervical spinal cord Disease Team project would be myriad. First, a novel therapy could improve the quality of life for SCI patients, restore some function, or reverse paralysis, providing an unmet medical need to SCI patients and reducing the high cost of health care. Moreover, this Disease Team would maintain California’s prominence in the stem cell field and in clinical translation of stem cell therapies, and finally, would create new jobs in stem cell technology and manufacturing areas to complement the state’s prominence in the biotech field.

White matter neuroregeneration after chemotherapy: stem cell therapy for “chemobrain”

Funding Type: 
New Faculty Physician Scientist
Grant Number: 
RN3-06510
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 800 536
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Brain Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Chemotherapy for cancer is often life saving, but it also causes a debilitating syndrome of impaired cognition characterized by deficits in attention, concentration, information processing speed, multitasking and memory. As a result, many cancer survivors find themselves unable to return to work or function in their lives as they had before their cancer therapy. These cognitive deficits, colloquially known as "chemobrain" or "chemofog," are long-lasting and sometimes irreversible. For example, breast cancer survivors treated with chemotherapy suffer from cognitive disability even 20 years later. These cognitive problems occur because chemotherapy damages the neural stem and precursor cells necessary for the health of the brain's infrastructure, called white matter. We have discovered a powerful way to recruit the stem/precursor cells required for white matter repair that depends on an interaction between the electrical cells of the brain, neurons, and these white matter stem/precursor cells. In this project, we will determine the key molecules responsible for the regenerative influence of neurons on these white matter stem cells and will develop that molecule (or molecules) into a drug to treat chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction. If successful, this will result in the first effective treatment for a disease that affects at least a million cancer survivors in California.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Approximately 100,000 Californians are diagnosed with cancer each year, and the majority of these people require chemotherapy. While cancer chemotherapy is often life saving, it also causes a debilitating neurocognitive syndrome characterized by impaired attention, concentration, information processing speed, multitasking and memory. As a result, many cancer survivors find themselves unable to return to work or function in their lives as they had before their cancer therapy. These cognitive deficits, colloquially known as "chemobrain" or "chemofog" are long-lasting; for example, cognitive deficits have been demonstrated in breast cancer survivors treated with chemotherapy even 20 years later. With increasing cancer survival rates, the number of people living with cognitive disability from chemotherapy is growing and includes well over a million Californians. Presently, there is no known therapy for chemotherapy-induced cognitive decline, and physicians can only offer symptomatic treatment with medications such as psychostimulants. The underlying cause of "chemobrain" is damage to neural stem and precursor cell populations. The proposed project may result in an effective regenerative strategy to restore damaged neural precursor cell populations and ameliorate or cure the cognitive syndrome caused by chemotherapy. The benefit to California in terms of improved quality of life for cancer survivors and restored occupational productivity would be immeasurable.
Progress Report: 
  • Cancer chemotherapy can be lifesaving but frequently results in long-term cognitive deficits. This project seeks to establish a regenerative strategy for chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction by harnessing the potential of the interactions between active neurons and glial precursor cells that promote myelin plasticity in the healthy brain. In the first year of this award, we have made on-track progress towards establishing a working experimental model system of chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity that faithfully models the human disease both in terms of the cellular damage as well as functional deficits in cognition. We have also been able to identify several therapeutic candidate molecules that we will be studying in the coming years of the project to ascertain which of these candidates are sufficient to promote OPC population repletion and neuro-regeneration after chemotherapy exposure.

Use of iPS cells (iPSCs) to develop novels tools for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy.

Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies II
Grant Number: 
RT2-02040
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 933 022
Disease Focus: 
Spinal Muscular Atrophy
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases in children. One in thirty five people carry a mutation in a gene called survival of motor neurons 1 (SMN1) which is responsible for this disease. If two carriers have children together they have a one in four chance of having a child with SMA. Children with Type I SMA seem fine until around 6 months of age, at which time they begin to show lack of muscular development and slowly develop a "floppy" syndrome over the next 6 months. Following this period, SMA children become less able to move and are eventually paralyzed by the disease by 3 years of age or earlier. We know that this mutation causes the death of motor neurons - which are important for making muscle cells work. Interestingly, there is a second gene which can lessen the severity of the disease process (SMN2). Children with more copies of this modifying gene have less severe symptoms and can live for longer periods of time (designated Type II, III and IV and living longer periods respectively). There is no therapy for SMA at the current time. One of the roadblocks is that there are no human models for this disorder as it is very difficult to make the motor neurons that die in the disease in the laboratory. The researchers in the current proposal have recently created pluripotent stem cells from a patient with Type I SMA (the most severe) and shown that motor neurons grown out from the pluripotent stem cells also die in the culture dish just like they do in children. This is an important model for SMA. The proposed research takes this model of SMA and extends it to Type II and Type III children in order to have a wider range of disease severity in the culture dish (Type IV is very rare and difficult to get samples from). It then develops new technologies to produce very large numbers of motor neurons and perform large scale analysis of their survival profiles. Finally, it will explore whether novel compounds can slow down the degeneration of motor neurons in this model which should lead to the discovery of dew drugs that then may be used to treat the disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The aim of this research is to develop novel drugs to treat a lethal childhood disease - SMA. There would be three immediate benefits to the state of California and its citizens. 1. Children in California would have access to novel drugs to slow or prevent their disease. 2. SMA is a world wide disease. The institutions involved with the research would be able to generate income from any new drugs developed and the profit from this would come back to California. 3. The project will employ a number of research staff in Californian institutions
Progress Report: 
  • This year we have created a large number of new SMA lines, developed ways to differentiate them into motor neurons using high content dishes, and begun to analyze the health of the motor neurons over time. We have also submitted a new paper showing that much of the cell death seen in the dying motor neurons is due to apoptosis - a form of cell death that is treatable with specific types of drug. We are now using these new lines to begin setting up screening runs with drug libraries and should be able to start these in the new year of funding.
  • In this year we have made more induced pluripotent stem (iPSC) cell lines from Spinal Muscular Atrophy patients also using blood cells in addition to skin cells. Blood cells from patients are usually more readi;y accessible. As such, this technique can be used to make larger bank of similar cell lines. We have also rigorously tested all the iPSCs them for their quality. These lines are now available for distribution to other California researchers along with a certificate of analysis.
  • Motor neurons are a type of neuron that control muscle movement and are markedly destroyed in SMA patients. In order for these powerful iPS cells form patients to be useful for discovering new drugs for SMA it is very important that we can make motor neurons from iPSCs in large quantities of millions to billions in number. Only then will testing of thousands to millions of new drugs would be feasible in neurons from SMA patients. To this end, we have created a method for making a predecessor cell type to human motor neurons from human iPSCs in a petri dish. These predecessor cells, known as motor neuron precursor spheres (iMNPS), are grown as clumps of floating spherical balls, each containing thousands such cells that are grown in large numbers repeatedly for long periods of time. We have made these iMNPS now from many SMA patients as well as healthy humans. These spheres can be preserved for long period of time by freezing them at very low temperatures. They are then awoken at a later time making it convenient for testing large numbers of drugs.
  • Since iPSCs have the power to make any cell type in the human body, they can also be contaminated with other unwanted types of cells. Typically such a technique is very difficult to accomplish in pluripotent stem cells such as embryonic and iPSCs. Therefore, we have designed a more efficient scheme to generate iPSC lines from SMA patients that will become fluorescent color (green, red or blue) when then motor neurons are made from iPSCs. These types of cells are known as reporter cell lines. This will aid in picking out the desired cell type from patient iPSCs, in this case a motor neuron, and discard any unwanted cell types. This will enormously simplify testing of new drugs in SMA patient motor neurons.
  • Deficiency of an important protein in SMA patients is one of the key causes to the course of the disease. We have also designed an automated method for identifying new drugs in patient motor neurons that will test for correction of SMN protein levels in motor neurons.
  • In Year 3 we completed making all iPSC lines from Spinal Muscular Atrophy patients. We rigorously tested all the iPSCs for quality. These lines are now available for distribution to other California researchers along with a quality control certificate.
  • Motor neurons are a type of neuron that control muscle movement and are markedly destroyed in SMA patients. In order for these powerful iPS cells form patients to be useful for discovering new drugs for SMA it is very important that we can make motor neurons from iPSCs in billions and repeatedly. Only then will testing of thousands to millions of new drugs would be feasible in neurons from SMA patients.
  • To this end, we have created a method for making a predecessor cell type to human motor neurons from human iPSCs in a petri dish. These predecessor cells, known as motor neuron precursor spheres (iMPS), are grown as clumps of floating spherical balls, each containing thousands such cells that are grown in large numbers repeatedly for long periods of time. We have now tested our method in multiple patient cells and characterized these spheres. The iMPS have now been produced from many SMA patients as well as healthy humans. The next step we have developed is to take the iMPS to make motor neurons that are similar to those that are affected in SMA children. We have then discovered a method for creating them quickly. These aggregate spheres and spinal cord motor neurons from them can be preserved for long period of time by freezing them at very low temperatures. They are then awoken at a later time making it convenient for testing large numbers of drugs.
  • Since iPSCs have the power to make any cell type in the human body, they can also be contaminated with other unwanted types of cells. Typically such a technique is very difficult to accomplish in pluripotent stem cells such as embryonic and iPSCs. Therefore, we have designed a more efficient scheme to generate iPSC lines from SMA patients that will become fluorescent color (green, red or blue) when then motor neurons are made from iPSCs. These types of cells are known as reporter cell lines. This will aid in picking out the desired cell type from patient iPSCs, in this case a motor neuron, and discard any unwanted cell types. This will enormously simplify testing of new drugs in SMA patient motor neurons. Using new technologies that can edit, cut, copy, and paste new DNA in the stem cell genome, we are also developing ways to engineer iPS cell lines that will tag the motor neurons when they are made. This will allow us another method for making pure motor neurons and tracking them in a dish among other types of cells while they are alive.
  • Deficiency of an important SMN protein in SMA patients is one of the key causes to the course of the disease. An automated method has been developed for identifying what causes the SMA neurons to become sick and test new drugs in motor neurons. We are now gearing up to test some ~1400 known compounds on patient motor neurons to determine whether we can raise SMN protein levels in motor neurons.

Derivation of Parkinson's Disease Coded-Stem Cells (PD-SCs)

Funding Type: 
New Cell Lines
Grant Number: 
RL1-00682
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 589 760
Disease Focus: 
Parkinson's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Parkinson's disease (PD) is currently the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, severely debilitating approximately 1-2% of the US population. The disease is caused by a selective loss of dopamine-producing neurons located in a specific region of the brain. This loss leads to significant motor function impairment and age-dependent tremors. Unfortunately there is currently no cure for PD, however a synthetic dopamine treatment (L-DOPA), temporarily alleviates symptoms. The mechanisms of PD progression are currently unknown. However, genetic studies have identified that mutations (changes) in seven genes, including ?-synuclein, LRRK2, uchL1, parkin, PINK1, DJ-1 and ATP13A2 cause familial PD. Although the familial form of PD only affects a small portion of PD cases, uncovering the function of these genes may provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to the majority of PD cases. One of the best strategies to study PD mechanisms is to generate experimental models that mimic the initiation and progression of PD. A number of cellular and animal models have been developed for PD research. However, a model, which closely resembles the human degeneration process of PD, is currently not available because human neurons are unable to continuously propagate (grow) in culture. Human stem cells provide an opportunity to fulfill this task because these cells can grow and be programmed to generate dopamine nerve cells (the neurons under assault in PD patients). In this study, we propose to create stem cell lines that possess PD-associated mutations in two causative genes, PINK1 and parkin, using either rejected early stage embryos or cultured patient fibroblasts. These cell lines will in effect, represent a model of human PD degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Our working hypothesis is that PD-associated abnormal parkin or PINK1 genes cause degeneration of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons, and dopaminergic neurons in vivo via the same mechanism. We will fulfill three tasks in this study; 1/ To generate the PD-stem cell (PD-SCs) line which harbor abnormal or mutant parkin or PINK1 genes; 2/ To determine the whether the PD-SCs cell lines can form into midbrain dopaminergic nerve cells; 3/ To determine whether mutations in parkin and PINK1 effect the survival of dopaminergic neurons which are derived from the PD-SCs cells. Successful completion of this study will yield novel cellular models for studying the mechanisms involved in PD initiation and progression, and further screening remedies for PD treatment.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second leading neurodegenerative disease with no current cure available. Compared to other states, California is the highest in the incidence of this particular disease. First, California growers use approximately 250 million pounds of pesticides annually, about a quarter of all pesticides used in the US (Cal Pesticide use reporting system). A commonly used herbicide, paraquat, has been shown to induce parkinsonism in both animals and human. Other pesticides are also proposed as potential causative agents for PD. Studies have shown increased PD-caused mortality in agricultural pesticide-use counties in comparison to those non-use counties in California. Second, California has the largest Hispanic population. Studies suggest that incidence of PD is the highest among Hispanics (Van Den Eeden et al, American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol 157, pages 1015-1022, 2003). Thus, finding effective treatments of PD will significantly benefit citizens in California.
Progress Report: 
  • Parkinson’s disease (PD) is currently the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, severely debilitating approximately 1-2% of the US population. The disease is caused by a selective loss of dopamine-producing neurons located in a specific region of the brain. This loss leads to significant motor function impairment and age-dependent tremors. Unfortunately there is currently no cure for PD, however a synthetic dopamine treatment (L-DOPA), temporarily alleviates symptoms.
  • The mechanism of PD progression are currently unknown. However, genetic studies have identified that mutations (changes) in multiple genes, including α-synuclein, LRRK2, uchL1, parkin, PINK1, DJ-1 and ATP13A2 cause familial PD. Although the familial form of PD only affects a small portion of PD cases, uncovering the function of these genes may provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to the majority of PD cases.
  • One of the best strategies to study PD mechanisms is to generate experimental models that mimic the initiation and progression of PD. A number of cellular and animal models have been developed for PD research. However, a model, which closely resembles the human degeneration process of PD, is currently not available because human neurons are unable to continuously propagate (grow) in culture. Human stem cells provide an opportunity to fulfill this task because these cells can grow and be programmed to generate dopamine nerve cells (the neurons under assault in PD patients).
  • In this study, we propose to create stem cell lines that possess PD-associated mutations in two causative genes, PINK1 and parkin, using either rejected early stage embryos or cultured patient fibroblasts. These cell lines will in effect, represent a model of human PD degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Our working hypothesis is that PD-associated abnormal parkin or PINK1 genes cause degeneration of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons, and dopaminergic neurons in vivo via the same mechanism. We will fulfill three tasks in this study; 1/ To generate the PD-stem cell (PD-SCs) line which harbor abnormal or mutant parkin or PINK1 genes; 2/ To determine the whether the PD-SCs cell lines can form into midbrain dopaminergic nerve cells; 3/ To determine whether mutations in parkin and PINK1 effect the survival of dopaminergic neurons which are derived from the PD-SCs cells. Successful completion of this study will yield novel cellular models for studying the mechanisms involved in PD initiation and progression, and further screening remedies for PD treatment.
  • During last year, we have successfully generated primary skin fibroblast cultures from PD patients harboring mutations of parkin, PINK1, and DJ-1 genes, as well as sporadic PD patients and normal individuals. By using these cells, we have already generated four induced stem cell lines expressing multiple pluripotent markers (two from PD patients and two from normal individuals. These lines can also form teratomas with cells from three germ layers using mouse as host. These findings suggest that the induced pluripotent cell lines generated in the lab are likely PD patient specific stem cells.
  • During the next report year, we will continue to generate more PD patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells. We will carefully characterize all lines generated in the lab as proposed. Furthermore, we will adapt protocols to differentiate the new lines into dopaminergic neurons.
  • Public Summary of Scientific Progress
  • Parkinson’s disease (PD) is currently the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder affecting approximately 1-2% of the US population. The disease is caused by a selective loss of dopamine-producing neurons located in a specific region of the brain. This loss leads to significant motor function impairment and age-dependent tremors. Unfortunately, there is currently no cure for PD, however a synthetic dopamine treatment (L-DOPA), temporarily alleviates symptoms.
  • Genetic studies have identified that mutations (changes) in multiple genes cause familial PD. Although the familial form of PD only affects a small portion of PD cases, uncovering the function of these genes in PD-affected dopamine-secretion neurons may provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to the majority of PD cases.
  • One of the best strategies to study PD mechanisms is to generate experimental models that mimic the initiation and progression of PD. A number of cellular and animal models have been developed for PD research. However, a model, which closely resembles the human degeneration process of PD, is currently not available because human neurons are unable to continuously propagate (grow) in culture. Human stem cells provide an opportunity to fulfill this task because these cells can grow and be programmed to generate dopamine nerve cells (the neurons under assault in PD patients).
  • In this study, we propose to create stem cell lines that possess PD-associated mutations in two causative genes, PINK1 and parkin, using either rejected early stage embryos or cultured patient fibroblasts. These cell lines will in effect, represent a model of human PD degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Our working hypothesis is that PD-associated abnormal parkin or PINK1 genes cause degeneration of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons, and dopaminergic neurons in vivo via the same mechanism. We will fulfill three tasks in this study; 1/ To generate the PD-stem cell (PD-SCs) line which harbor abnormal or mutant parkin or PINK1 genes; 2/ To determine the whether the PD-SCs cell lines can form into midbrain dopaminergic nerve cells; 3/ To determine whether mutations in parkin and PINK1 effect the survival of dopaminergic neurons which are derived from the PD-SCs cells. Successful completion of this study will yield novel cellular models for studying the mechanisms involved in PD initiation and progression, and further screening remedies for PD treatment.
  • During last year, we have successfully obtained more primary skin fibroblast cultures from PD patients harboring mutations of parkin, PINK1, DJ-1 and PLA2G6 genes, as well as sporadic PD patients and normal control individuals. By using these cells, we have already generated 9 induced stem cell lines expressing multiple pluripotent markers (7 from PD patients and 2 from normal individuals). These lines can also form teratomas with cells from three germ layers using mouse as host. These findings suggest that the induced pluripotent cell lines generated in the lab are likely PD patient specific stem cells.
  • During the next report year, we will continue to generate more PD patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells. We will carefully characterize all lines generated in the lab as proposed. Furthermore, we will adapt protocols to differentiate the new lines into dopaminergic neurons.
  • Parkinson’s disease (PD) is currently the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, severely debilitating approximately 1-2% of the US population. The disease is caused by a selective loss of dopamine-producing neurons located in a specific region of the brain. This loss leads to significant motor function impairment and age-dependent tremors. Unfortunately there is currently no cure for PD, however a synthetic dopamine treatment (L-DOPA), temporarily alleviates symptoms.
  • The mechanism of PD progression is currently unknown. However, genetic studies have identified that mutations (changes) in multiple genes, including α-synuclein, LRRK2, uchL1, parkin, PINK1, DJ-1 and ATP13A2 cause familial PD. Although the familial form of PD only affects a small portion of PD cases, uncovering the function of these genes may provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to the majority of PD cases.
  • One of the best strategies to study PD mechanisms is to generate experimental models that mimic the initiation and progression of PD. A number of cellular and animal models have been developed for PD research. However, a model, which closely resembles the human degeneration process of PD, is currently not available because human neurons are unable to continuously propagate (grow) in culture. Human stem cells provide an opportunity to fulfill this task because these cells can grow and be programmed to generate dopamine nerve cells (the neurons under assault in PD patients).
  • In this study, we propose to create stem cell lines that either have the genetic background of sporadic PD patients or possess PD-associated mutations using cultured patient fibroblasts. These cell lines will in effect, represent a model of human PD degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Our working hypothesis is that the degeneration of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons and dopaminergic neurons in vivo via the same mechanism. We will fulfill three tasks in this study; 1/ To generate the PD-stem cell (PD-SCs) line which either have the genetic background of sporadic PD patients or harbor PD specific gene mutantions; 2/ To determine the whether the PD-SCs cell lines can form into midbrain dopaminergic nerve cells; 3/ To determine whether mutations in parkin and PINK1 effect the survival of dopaminergic neurons which are derived from the PD-SCs cells. Successful completion of this study will yield novel cellular models for studying the mechanisms involved in PD initiation and progression, and further screening remedies for PD treatment.
  • During last year, we have finished to develop 15 lines of iPSCs. These include 5 lines from normal control individuals, 5 lines from sporadic Parkinson disease patients, and 5 lines from Parkinson disease patients harboring disease related mutations of PINK1, DJ-1 and PLA2G6 genes. These lines provide an unique opportunity to systematically study comparative pathophysiology of Parkinson disease using sporadic and genetic cases. Moreover, we indeed spent more than a year in optimizing the condition for differentiation of these lines. It is recognized that iPSCs are more difficult to differentiate than the hESCs. We are now able to finalize the protocols to have all lines be differentiated in vitro. Therefore, we will be able to compare differences among the controls, sporadic PD and genetic PD at the level of cell biology and molecular biology.
  • During the next report year, we will differentiate all lines into DA neurons and carefully the functional changes of these cells. We hope that the results will reveal some molecular basis of PD pathogenesis from these human neurons.
  • Parkinson’s disease (PD) is currently the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, severely debilitating approximately 1-2% of the US population. The disease is caused by a selective loss of dopamine-producing neurons located in a specific region of the brain. This loss leads to significant motor function impairment and age-dependent tremors. Unfortunately there is currently no cure for PD, however a synthetic dopamine treatment (L-DOPA), temporarily alleviates symptoms.
  • The mechanism of PD progression is currently unknown. However, genetic studies have identified that mutations (changes) in multiple genes, including α-synuclein, LRRK2, uchL1, parkin, PINK1, DJ-1 and ATP13A2 cause familial PD. Although the familial form of PD only affects a small portion of PD cases, uncovering the function of these genes may provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to the majority of PD cases.
  • One of the best strategies to study PD mechanisms is to generate experimental models that mimic the initiation and progression of PD. A number of cellular and animal models have been developed for PD research. However, a model, which closely resembles the human degeneration process of PD, is currently not available because human neurons are unable to continuously propagate (grow) in culture. Human stem cells provide an opportunity to fulfill this task because these cells can grow and be programmed to generate dopamine nerve cells (the neurons under assault in PD patients).
  • In this study, we propose to create stem cell lines that either have the genetic background of sporadic PD patients or possess PD-associated mutations using cultured patient fibroblasts. These cell lines will in effect, represent a model of human PD degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Our working hypothesis is that the degeneration of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons and dopaminergic neurons in vivo via the same mechanism. We will fulfill three tasks in this study; 1/ To generate the PD-stem cell (PD-SCs) line which either have the genetic background of sporadic PD patients or harbor PD specific gene mutantions; 2/ To determine the whether the PD-SCs cell lines can form into midbrain dopaminergic nerve cells; 3/ To determine whether mutations in parkin and PINK1 effect the survival of dopaminergic neurons which are derived from the PD-SCs cells. Successful completion of this study will yield novel cellular models for studying the mechanisms involved in PD initiation and progression, and further screening remedies for PD treatment.
  • During last four years, we have finished to develop 15 lines of iPSCs. These include 5 lines from normal control individuals, 5 lines from sporadic Parkinson disease patients, and 5 lines from Parkinson disease patients harboring disease related mutations of PINK1, DJ-1 and PLA2G6 genes. These iPS lines are shown to have biochemical and genomic characteristics of human ES cells. These lines provide an unique opportunity to systematically study comparative pathophysiology of Parkinson disease using sporadic and genetic cases. Using these lines, we have identified a group of genes differentially expressed and differentially methylated between iPS cells derived from PD patients and iPS cells derived from normal control individuals. However, we recognize that iPSCs are more difficult to differentiate than the hESCs. We are yet to finalize the protocols to have all lines be differentiated in vitro. Our goal is to compare differences among the controls, sporadic PD and genetic PD at the level of cell biology and molecular biology.

Generation of clinical grade human iPS cells

Funding Type: 
New Cell Lines
Grant Number: 
RL1-00681
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 382 400
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Melanoma
Cancer
Muscular Dystrophy
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
The therapeutic use of stem cells depends on the availability of pluripotent cells that are not limited by technical, ethical or immunological considerations. The goal of this proposal is to develop and bank safe and well-characterized patient-specific pluripotent stem cell lines that can be used to study and potentially ameliorate human diseases. Several groups, including ours have recently shown that adult skin cells can be reprogrammed in the laboratory to create new cells that behave like embryonic stem cells. These new cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells should have the potential to develop into any cell type or tissue type in the body. Importantly, the generation of these cells does not require human embryos or human eggs. Since these cells can be derived directly from patients, they will be genetically identical to the patient, and cannot be rejected by the immune system. This concept opens the door to the generation of patient-specific stem cell lines with unlimited differentiation potential. While the current iPS cell technology enables us now to generate patient-specific stem cells, this technology has not yet been applied to derive disease-specific human stem cell lines for laboratory study. Importantly, these new cells are also not yet suitable for use in transplantation medicine. For example, the current method to make these cells uses retroviruses and genes that could generate tumors or other undesirable mutations in cells derived from iPS cells. Thus, in this proposal, we aim to improve the iPS cell reprogramming method, to make these cells safer for future use in transplant medicine. We will also generate a large number of iPS lines of different genetic or disease backgrounds, to allow us to characterize these cells for function and as targets to study new therapeutic approaches for various diseases. Lastly, we will establish protocols that would allow the preparation of these types of cells for clinical use by physicians investigating new stem cell-based therapies in a wide variety of diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Several groups, including ours have recently shown that adult skin cells can be reprogrammed in the laboratory to create new cells that behave like embryonic stem cells. These new cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells should have, similar to embryonic stem cells, the potential to develop into any cell type or tissue type in the body. This new technology holds great promise for patient-specific stem-cell based therapies, the production of in vitro models for human disease, and is thought to provide the opportunity to perform experiments in human cells that were not previously possible, such as screening for compounds that inhibit or reverse disease progression. The advantage of using iPS cells for transplantation medicine would be that the patient’s own cells would be reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell state and therefore, when transplanted back into the patient, the cells would not be attacked and destroyed by the body's immune system. Importantly, these new cells are not yet suitable for use in transplantation medicine or studies of human diseases, as their derivation results in permanent genetic changes, and their differentiation potential has not been fully studied. The goal of this proposal is to develop and bank genetically unmodified and well-characterized iPS cell lines of different genetic or disease backgrounds that can be used to characterize these cells for function and as targets to study new therapeutic approaches for various human diseases. We will establish protocols that would allow the preparation of these types of cells for clinical use by physicians investigating new stem cell-based therapies in a wide variety of diseases. Taken together, this would be beneficial to the people of California as tens of millions of Americans suffer from diseases and injuries that could benefit from such research. Californians will also benefit greatly as these studies should speed the transition of iPS cells to clinical use, allowing faster development of stem cell-based therapies.
Progress Report: 
  • The goal of this project is to develop and bank safe, well-characterized pluripotent stem cell lines that can be used to study and potentially ameliorate human diseases, and that are not limited by technical, ethical or immunological considerations. To that end, we proposed to establish protocols for generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) that would not involve viral vector integration, and that would be compatible with Good Manufacturing Processes (GMP) standards. To establish baseline characteristics of hiPSCs, we performed a complete molecular characterization of all existing hiPSCs in comparison to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We found that all hiPSC lines created to date, regardless of the method by which they were reprogrammed, shared a common gene expression signature, distinct from that of hESCs. The functional role of this gene expression signature is still unclear, but any lines that are generated under the guise of this grant will be subjected to a similar analysis to set the framework by which these new lines are functionally characterized. Our efforts to develop new strategies for the production of safe iPS cells have yielded many new cell lines generated by various techniques, all of which are safer than the standard retroviral protocol. We are currently expanding many of the hiPSCs lines generated and will soon demonstrate whether their gene expression profile, differentiation capability, and genomic stability make them suitable for banking in our iPSC core facility. Once fully characterized, these cells will be available from our bank for other investigators.
  • For hiPSC technology to be useful clinically, the procedures to derive these cells must be robust enough that iPSC can be obtained from the majority of donors. To determine the versatility of generation of iPS cells, we have now derived hiPSCs from commercially obtained fibroblasts derived from people of different ages (newborn through 66 years old) as well as from different races (Caucasian and mixed race). We are currently evaluating medium preparations that will be suitable for GMP-level use. Future work will ascertain the best current system for obtaining hiPSC, and establish GMP-compliant methodologies.
  • The goal of this project is to develop and bank safe, well-characterized pluripotent stem cell lines that can be used to study and potentially ameliorate human diseases. To speed this process, we are taking approaches that are not limited by technical, ethical or immunological considerations. We are establishing protocols for generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) that would not involve viral vector integration, and that are compatible with Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) standards. Our efforts to develop new strategies for the production of safe hiPSC have yielded many new cell lines generated by various techniques. We are characterizing these lines molecularly, and have found hiPSCs can be made that are nearly indistinguishable from human embryonic stem cells (hESC). We have also recently found in all the hiPSCs generated from female fibroblasts, none reactivated the X chromosome. This finding has opened a new frontier in the study and potential treatment of X-linked diseases. We are currently optimizing protocols to generate hiPSC lines that are derived, reprogrammed and differentiated in the absence of animal cell products, and preparing detailed standard operating procedures that will ready this technology for clinical utility.
  • This project was designed to generate protocols whereby human induced pluripotent stem cells could be generated in a manner consistent with use in clinical trials. This required optimization of protocols and generation of standard operating procedures such that animal products were not involved in generation and growth of the cells. We have successfully identified such a protocol as a resource to facilitate widespread adoption of these practices.

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