Neurological Disorders

Coding Dimension ID: 
303
Coding Dimension path name: 
Neurological Disorders

Identifying Drugs for Alzheimer's Disease with Human Neurons Made From Human IPS cells

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05577
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 857 600
Disease Focus: 
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
We propose to discover new drug candidates for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), which is common, fatal, and for which no effective disease-modifying drugs are available. Because no effective AD treatment is available or imminent, we propose to discover novel candidates by screening purified human brain cells made from human reprogrammed stem cells (human IPS cells or hIPSC) from patients that have rare and aggressive hereditary forms of AD. We have already discovered that such human brain cells exhibit an unique biochemical behavior that indicates early development of AD in a dish. Thus, we hope to find new drugs by using the new tools of human stem cells that were previously unavailable. We think that human brain cells in a dish will succeed where animal models and other types of cells have thus far failed.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that afflicts millions of Californians. The emotional and financial impact on families and on the state healthcare budget is enormous. This project seeks to find new drugs to treat this terrible disease. If we are successful our work in the long-term may help diminish the social and familial cost of AD, and lead to establishment of new businesses in California using our approaches to drug discovery for AD.
Progress Report: 
  • We have made steady and significant progress in developing a way to use human reprogrammed stem cells to develop drugs for Alzheimer's disease. In the more recent project term we have further refined our key assay, and generated sufficient cells to enable screening of 50,000 different chemical candidates that might reveal potential drugs for this terrible disease. With a little bit of additional refinement, we will be able to begin our search in earnest in collaboration with the Sanford-Burnham Prebys Screening Center.
  • During the past year we completed screening of our Alzheimers “disease in a dish” cultured stem cell lines for response of a critical measure of Alzheimers disease in a dish to FDA approved drugs and other potentially promising drug like compounds. We found several reproducible and interesting categories of potential drugs some of which are already in common use in human patients and therefore might be readily available to the Alzheimer's disease population. We are conducting more careful analyses of these drugs for their mechanism and behavior in human neurons with different types of Alzheimer like behavior and we are beginning to test whether all human variants behave the same way as preparation for potential clinical trials. We are also initiating analysis of new chemical entities for possible modification to improve potency.

Engineering microscale tissue constructs from human pluripotent stem cells

Funding Type: 
Research Leadership 14
Grant Number: 
LA1_C14-08015
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$6 368 285
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
Directly Reprogrammed Cell
Public Abstract: 
Tissues derived from stem cells can serve multiple purposes to enhance biomedical therapies. Human tissues engineered from stem cells hold tremendous potential to serve as better substrates for the discovery and development of new drugs, accurately model development or disease progression, and one day ultimately be used directly to repair, restore and replace traumatically injured and chronically degenerative organs. However, realizing the full potential of stem cells for regenerative medicine applications will require the ability to produce constructs that not only resemble the structure of real tissues, but also recapitulate appropriate physiological functions. In addition, engineered tissues should behave similarly regardless of the varying source of cells, thus requiring robust, reproducible and scalable methods of biofabrication that can be achieved using a holistic systems engineering approach. The primary objective of this research proposal is to create models of cardiac and neural human tissues from stem cells that can be used for various purposes to improve the quality of human health.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
California has become internationally renowned as home to the world's most cutting-edge stem cell biology and a global leader of clinical translation and commercialization activities for stem cell technologies and therapies. California has become the focus of worldwide attention due in large part to the significant investment made by the citizens of the state to prioritize innovative stem cell research as a critical step in advancing future biomedical therapies that can significantly improve the quality of life for countless numbers of people suffering from traumatic injuries, congenital disorders and chronic degenerative diseases. At this stage, additional investment in integration of novel tissue engineering principles with fundamental stem cell research will enable the development of novel human tissue constructs that can be used to further the translational use of stem cell-derived tissues for regenerative medicine applications. This proposal would enable the recruitment of a leading biomedical engineer with significant tissue engineering experience to collaborate with leading cardiovascular and neural investigators. The expected result will be development of new approaches to engineer transplantable tissues from pluripotent stem cell sources leading to new regenerative therapies as well as an enhanced understanding of mechanisms regulating human tissue development.

Immune-Matched Neural Stem Cell Transplantation for Pediatric Neurodegenerative Disease

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05476
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$5 509 978
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Children with inherited degenerative diseases of the brain will be among the first to benefit from novel approaches based on stem cell therapy (SCT). This assertion is based on a number of medical and experimental observations and precedents including: 1) These diseases currently lack effective therapies and can cause profound mental retardation or lead to death; 2) SCT has already been shown to work in the milder forms of similar diseases that do not affect the brain; 3) Experimental work and early clinical studies have clearly shown that stem cells delivered directly into the brain can be used to treat diseases affecting the brain; and 4) The clinical safety of stem cells delivered directly into the brain has already been established during recent Phase 1 clinical trials. Our approach is designed to lead to a therapeutic development candidate, based on stem cells, by addressing two critical issues: (i) that early intervention is not only required but is indeed possible in this patient population and that, (ii) induction of immune tolerance is also required. We not only address these two important issues but also set the stage for efficient translation of our approach into clinical practice, by adapting transplant techniques that are standard in clinical practice or in clinical trials and using laboratory cell biology methods that are easily transferrable to the scale and processes of clinical cell manufacturing.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
We are focusing on a class of childhood brain diseases that causes a child's brain to degenerate and results in severe mental retardation or death, in addition to damage to many other organ systems. These diseases are not yet represented in CIRM’s portfolio. Recently blood stem cell transplantation has been applied to these diseases, showing that some of the organ systems can be rescued by stem cell therapy. Unfortunately, the brain component of the disease is not impacted by blood stem cell therapy. Our team proposes to take these important lessons to develop a therapy that treats all organ dysfunction, including brain. Because of the established stem cell success in the clinical treatment of non-brain organs and the experimental treatment of the brain, we propose a novel, combined stem cell therapy. Based on our own work and recent clinical experience, this dual stem cell therapy has a high probability of success for slowing or reversing disease, and importantly, will not require children to be treated with toxic immunosuppressive drugs. This therapy will thus benefit California by: 1) reducing disease burden in individuals and the State's burden for caring for these children; 2) providing a successful model of stem cell therapy of the brain that will both bolster public confidence in CIRM's mission to move complex stem cell therapies into the clinic; and 3) laying the groundwork for using this type of therapy with other brain diseases of children.
Progress Report: 
  • The purpose of the ET3RA is to establish an experimental model of stem cell transplantation that accomplishes two equally important goals: 1) to devise a strategy of protection of the child's brain from the ravages of certain genetic diseases and 2) to devise a simultaneous strategy of transplantation that avoids immune system rejection. In our first year of work, we have shown that we can reliably produce the stem cells that we want to transplant into the brains of experimental animals (mice). We have also bred sufficient numbers of mice for the transplant experiments and have started the immune system-based strategy of transplantation. This puts us in the proper position to begin the brain stem cell transplantation in year 2. Thus, we are on course to accomplishing our goals for this ET3RA and for eventual development of this strategy for the initiation of clinical trials.
  • The purpose of the ET3RA is to establish an experimental model of stem cell transplantation that accomplishes two equally important goals: 1) to devise a strategy of protection of the child's brain from the ravages of certain genetic diseases and 2) to devise a simultaneous strategy of transplantation that avoids immune system rejection. In our first year of work, we have shown that we can reliably produce the stem cells that we want to transplant into the brains of experimental animals (mice). We have also bred sufficient numbers of mice for the transplant experiments and have started the immune system-based strategy of transplantation. During the second year, we successfully finished our first round of transplantation experiments, we fully characterized the stem cells for brain transplantation, we showed that the cells have the desired biological effects in the culture dish, and we completed installation of our Cell Production Facility. Thus, we are still on course to accomplishing our goals for this ET3RA and for eventual development of this strategy for the initiation of clinical trials.

Site-specific integration of Lmx1a, FoxA2, & Otx2 to optimize dopaminergic differentiation

Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies II
Grant Number: 
RT2-01880
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 619 627
Disease Focus: 
Parkinson's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
The objective of this study is to develop a new, optimized technology to obtain a homogenous population of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons in a culture dish through neuronal differentiation. Dopaminergic neurons of the midbrain are the main source of dopamine in the mammalian central nervous system. Their loss is associated with one of the most prominent human neurological disorders, Parkinson's disease (PD). There is no cure for PD, or good long-term therapeutics without deleterious side effects. Therefore, there is a great need for novel drugs and therapies to halt or reverse the disease. Recent groundbreaking discoveries allow us to use adult human skin cells, transduce them with specific genes, and generate cells that exhibit virtually all characteristics of embryonic stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). These cell lines, when derived from PD patient skin cells, can be used as an experimental pre-clinical model to study disease mechanisms unique to PD. These cells will not only serve as an ‘authentic’ model for PD when further differentiated into the specific dopaminergic neurons, but that these cells are actually pathologically affected with PD. All of the current protocols for directed neuronal differentiation from iPSCs are lengthy and suboptimal in terms of efficiency and reproducibility of defined cell populations. This hinders the ability to establish a robust model in-a-dish for the disease of interest, in our case PD-related neurodegeneration. We will use a new, efficient gene integration technology to induce expression of midbrain specific transcription factors in iPSC lines derived from a patient with PD and a sibling control. Forced expression of these midbrain transcription factors will direct iPSCs to differentiate into DA neurons in cell culture. We aim at achieving higher efficiency and reproducibility in generating a homogenous population of midbrain DA neurons, which will lay the foundation for successfully modeling PD and improving hit rates of future drug screening approaches. Our study could also set a milestone towards the establishment of efficient, stable, and reproducible neuronal differentiation using a technology that has proven to be safe and is therefore suitable for cell replacement therapies in human. The absence of cellular models of Parkinson’s disease represents a major bottleneck in the scientific field of Parkinson’s disease, which, if solved, would be instantly translated into a wide range of clinical applications, including drug discovery. This is an essential avenue if we want to offer our patients a new therapeutic approach that can give them a near normal life after being diagnosed with this progressively disabling disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The proposed research could lead to a robust model in-a-dish for Parkinson’s disease (PD)-related neurodegeneration. This outcome would deliver a variety of benefits to the state of California. First, there would be a profound personal impact on patients and their families if the current inevitable decline of PD patients could be halted or reversed. This would bring great happiness and satisfaction to the tens of thousands of Californians affected directly or indirectly by PD. Progress toward a cure for PD is also likely to accelerate the development of treatments for other degenerative disorders. The technology for PD modeling in-a-dish could be applied to other cell types such as cardiomyocytes (for heart diseases) and beta-cells (for diabetes). The impact would likely stimulate medical progress on a variety of conditions in which stem cell based drug screening and therapy could be beneficial. An effective drug and therapy for PD would also bring economic benefits to the state. Currently, there is a huge burden of costs associated with the care of patients with long-term degenerative disorders like PD, which afflict tens of thousands of patients statewide. If the clinical condition of these patients could be improved, the cost of maintenance would be reduced, saving billions in medical costs. Many of these patients would be more able to contribute to the workforce and pay taxes. Another benefit is the effect of novel, cutting-edge technologies developed in California on the business economy of the state. Such technologies can have a profound effect on the competitiveness of California through the formation of new manufacturing and health care delivery facilities that would employ California citizens and bring new sources of revenue to the state. Therefore, this project has the potential to bring health and economic benefits to California that is highly desirable for the state.
Progress Report: 
  • Dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the midbrain are the main source of dopamine in the mammalian central nervous system. Their loss is associated with a prominent human neurological disorder, Parkinson's disease (PD). There is no cure for PD, nor are there any good long-term therapeutics without deleterious side effects. Therefore, there is a great need for novel therapies to halt or reverse the disease. The objective of this study is to develop a new technology to obtain a purer, more abundant population of midbrain DA neurons in a culture dish. Such cells would be useful for disease modeling, drug screening, and development of cell therapies.
  • Recent discoveries allow us to use adult human skin cells, introduce specific genes into them, and generate cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), that exhibit the characteristics of embryonic stem cells. These iPSC, when derived from PD patient skin cells, can be used as an experimental model to study disease mechanisms that are unique to PD. When differentiated into DA neurons, and these cells are actually pathologically affected with PD.
  • The current methods for directed DA neuronal differentiation from iPSC are inadequate in terms of efficiency and reproducibility. This situation hinders the ability to establish a robust model for PD-related neurodegeneration. In this study, we use a new, efficient gene integration technology to induce expression of midbrain-specific genes in iPSC lines derived from a patient with PD and a normal sibling. Forced expression of these midbrain transcription factor genes directs iPSC to differentiate into DA neurons in cell culture. A purer population of midbrain DA neurons may lay the foundation for successfully modeling PD and improving hit rates in drug screening approaches.
  • The milestones for the first year of the project were to establish PD-specific iPSC lines that contain genomic “docking” sites, termed “attP” sites. In year 2, these iPSC/attP cell lines will be used to insert midbrain-specific transcription factors with high efficiency, mediated by enzymes called integrases. We previously established an improved, high-efficiency, site-specific DNA integration technology in mice. This technology combines the integrase system with newly identified, actively expressed locations in the genome and ensures efficient, uniform gene expression.
  • The PD patient-specific iPSC lines we used were PI-1754, which contains a severe mutation in the SNCA (synuclein alpha) gene, and an unaffected sibling line, PI-1761. The SNCA mutation causes dramatic clinical symptoms of PD, with early-onset progressive disease. We use a homologous recombination-based procedure to place the “docking” site, attP, at well-expressed locations in the SNCA and control iPSC lines (Aim 1.1). We also included a human embryonic stem cell line, H9, to monitor our experimental procedures. The genomic locations we chose for placement of the attP sites included a site on chromosome 22 (Chr22) and a second, backup site on chromosome 19 (Chr19). These two sites were chosen based on mouse studies, in which mouse equivalents of both locations conferred strong gene expression. In order to perform recombination, we constructed targeting vectors, each containing an attP cassette flanked by 5’ and 3’ homologous fragments corresponding to the human genomic location we want to target. For the Chr22 locus, we were able to obtain all 3 targeting constructs for the PI-1754, PI-1761 and H9 cell lines. For technical reasons, we were not able to obtain constructs for the Chr19 location Thus, we decided to focus on the Chr22 locus and move to the next step.
  • We introduced the targeting vectors into the cells and selected for positive clones by both drug selection and green fluorescent protein expression. For the H9 cells, we obtained 110 double positive clones and analyzed 98 of them. We found 8 clones that had targeted the attP site precisely to the Chr22 locus. For the PI-1761 sibling control line, we obtained 44 clones, and 1 of them had the attP site inserted at the Chr22 locus. The PI-1754 SNCA mutant line, on the other hand, grows slowly in cell culture. We are in the process of obtaining enough cells to perform the recombination experiment in that cell line.
  • In summary, we demonstrated that the experimental strategy proposed in the grant indeed worked. We were successful in obtaining iPSC lines with a “docking” site placed in a pre-selected human genomic location. These cell lines are the necessary materials that set the stage for us to fulfill the milestones of year 2.
  • Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the midbrain. These DA neurons are the main source of dopamine, an important chemical in the central nervous system. PD is a common neurological disorder, affecting 1% of those at 60 years old and 4% of those over 80. Unfortunately, there is no cure for PD, nor are there any long-term therapeutics without harmful side effects. Therefore, there is a need for new therapies to halt or reverse the disease. The goal of this study is to develop a new technology that helps us obtain a purer, more abundant population of DA neurons in a culture dish and to characterize the resulting cells. These cells will be useful for studying the disease, screening potential drugs, and developing cell therapies.
  • Due to recent discoveries, we can introduce specific genes into adult human skin cells and generate cells similar to embryonic stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). These iPSC, when derived from PD patients, can be used as an experimental model to study disease mechanisms that are unique to PD, because when differentiated into DA neurons, these cells are actually pathologically affected with PD. We are using a PD iPSC line called PI-1754 derived from a patient with a severe mutation in the SNCA gene, which encodes alpha-synuclein. The SNCA mutation causes dramatic clinical symptoms of PD, with early-onset progressive disease. For comparison we are using a normal, unaffected sibling iPSC line PI-1761. We are also using a normal human embryonic stem cell (ESC) line H9 as the gold standard for differentiation.
  • The current methods for differentiating iPSC into DA neurons are not adequate in terms of efficiency and reliability. Our hypothesis is that forced expression of certain midbrain-specific genes called transcription factors will direct iPSC to differentiate more effectively into DA neurons in cell culture. We use transcription factors called Lmx1a, Otx2, and FoxA2, abbreviated L, O, and F. In this project, we have developed a new, efficient gene integration technology that allows us rapidly to introduce and express these transcription factor genes in various combinations, in order to test whether they stimulate the differentiation of iPSC into DA neurons.
  • In the first year of the project, we began establishing iPSC and ESC lines that contained a genomic “landing pad” site for insertion of the transcription factor genes. We carefully chose a location for placement of the genes based on previous work in mouse that suggested that a site on human chromosome 22 would provide strong and constant gene expression. We initially used ordinary homologous recombination to place the landing pad into this site. By the end of year 1 of the project, this method was successful in the normal iPSC and in the ESC, but not in the more difficult-to-grow PD iPSC. To solve this problem, in year 2 we introduced a new and more powerful recombination technology, called TALENs, and were successful in placing the landing pad in the correct position in all three of the lines, including the PD iPSC.
  • We were now in a position to insert the midbrain-specific transcription factor genes with high efficiency. For this step, we developed a new genome engineering methodology called DICE, for dual integrase cassette exchange. In this technology, we use two site-specific integrase enzymes, called phiC31 and Bxb1, to catalyze precise placement of the transcription factor genes into the desired place in the genome.
  • We constructed gene cassettes carrying all pair-wise combinations of the L, O, and F transcription factors, LO, LF, and OF, and the triple combination, LOF. We successfully demonstrated the power of this technology by rapidly generating a large set of iPSC and ESC that contained all the above combinations of transcription factors, as well as lines that contained no transcription factors, as negative controls for comparison. Two examples of each type of line for the 1754 and 1761 iPSC and the H9 ESC were chosen for differentiation and functional characterization studies. Initial results from these studies have demonstrated correct differentiation of neural stem cells and expression of the introduced transcription factor genes.
  • In summary, we were successful in obtaining ESC and iPSC lines from normal and PD patient cells that carry a landing pad in a pre-selected genomic location chosen and validated for strong gene expression. These lines are valuable reagents. We then modified these lines to add DA-associated transcription factors in four combinations. All these lines are currently undergoing differentiation studies in accordance with the year two and three timelines. During year three of the project, the correlation between expression of various transcription factors and the level of DA differentiation will be established. Furthermore, functional studies with the PD versus normal lines will be carried out.
  • The objective of this project is to develop approaches and technologies that will improve neuronal differentiation of stem cells into midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. DA neurons are of central importance in the project, because they are that cells that are impaired in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Current differentiation methods typically produce low yields of DA neurons. The methods also give variable results, and cell populations contain many types of cells. These impediments have hampered the study of disease mechanisms for PD, as well as other uses for the cells, such as drug screening and cell replacement therapy. Our strategy is to develop a novel method to introduce genes into the genome at a specific place, so we can rapidly add genes that might help in the differentiation of DA neurons. The genes we would like to add are called transcription factors, which are proteins involved differentiation of stem cells into DA neurons. We have placed the genes for three transcription factors into a safe, active position on human chromosome 22 in the cell lines we are studying. These cells, called pluripotent stem cells, have the potential to differentiate into almost any type of cell. We are using embryonic stem cells in our study, as well as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), which are similar, but are derived from adult cells, rather than an embryo. We are using iPSC derived from a PD patient, as well as iPSC from a normal person, for comparison. By forced expression of these neuronal transcription factors, we may achieve more efficient and reproducible generation of DA neurons. The effects of expressing different combinations of the three transcription factors called Lmx1a, FoxA2, and Otx2 on DA neuronal differentiation will be evaluated in the context of embryonic stem cells (ESC) as the gold standard, as well as in iPSC derived from a PD patient with a severe mutation in alpha-synuclein and iPSC derived from a normal control. Comparative functional assays of the resulting DA neurons will complete the analysis.
  • To date, this project has created a novel technology for modifying the genome. The strategy developed out of the one that we originally proposed, but contains several innovations that make it more powerful and useful. The new methodology, called DICE for Dual Integrase Cassette Exchange, allowed us to generate “master” or recipient cell lines for ESC, normal iPSC, and PD iPSC. These recipient cell lines contain a “landing pad” placed into a newly-identified actively-expressed location on human chromosome 22 called H11 that permits robust expression of genes placed into it. We then generated a series of cell lines by "cassette exchange" at the H11 locus. In cassette exchange, the new genes we want to add take the place of the landing pad we originally put into the cells. Cassette exchange is a good way to introduce various genes into the same place in the chromosomes. We created cell lines expressing three neuronal transcription factors suspected to be involved in DA neuronal differentiation, in all pair-wise combinations, including lines with expression of all three factors, and negative control lines with no transcription factors added. This collection of modified human pluripotent stem cell lines is now being used to study neural differentiation. The modified ESC have undergone differentiation into DA neurons and are being evaluated for the effects of the different transcription factor combinations on DA neuronal differentiation. During the final year of the project, this differentiation analysis will be completed, and we will also analyze functional properties of the differentiated DA neurons, with special emphasis on disease-related features of the cells derived from PD iPSC.

Use of human iPSC-derived neurons from Huntington’s Disease patients to develop novel, disease-modifying small molecule structural corrector drug candidates targeting the unique, neurotoxic conformation of mutant huntingtin

Funding Type: 
Early Translational IV
Grant Number: 
TR4-06847
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 333 795
Disease Focus: 
Huntington's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
The long-term objective of this project is to develop a drug to treat Huntington’s disease (HD), the most common inherited neurodegenerative disorder. Characterized by involuntary movements, personality changes and dementia, HD is a devastatingly progressive disease that results in death 10–20 years after disease onset and diagnosis. No therapy presently exists for HD; therefore, this project is highly innovative and ultimately aims to deliver something transformative for the HD patient population. The specific goal of the proposed research will be to achieve preclinical proof-of-concept with a novel small molecule that binds to and ameliorates the neurotoxicity of the mutant huntingtin (mHtt) protein that causes HD. Rationale for development of such compounds comes from previous research that found that mHtt assumes a shape that is selectively toxic to neurons, and that small molecules that disrupt this shape can reduce mHtt’s toxicity in primary neurons. Critical to the proposed studies will be assays that employ human striatal neurons derived from adult and juvenile HD patients and generated with induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology. These HD i-neurons display many characteristics that are also observed in striatal neurons of HD patients, including reduced survival times. They provide the most genetically precise preclinical system available to test for both drug efficacy and safety.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The long-term objective of this project is to develop a first-in-class, disease-modifying drug to treat Huntington’s disease (HD), a devastatingly progressive genetic disorder that results in death 10–20 years after disease onset and diagnosis. No therapy presently exists for HD; therefore, this highly innovative project aims to deliver a medical breakthrough that will provide significant benefit for California’s estimated > 2000 HD patients and the family members, friends and medical system that care for them. The proposed research will be performed at a biotechnology startup, a leading academic research center and two contract research organizations, all of which are California-based. The work will over time involve more than 10 California scientists, thereby helping to employ tax-paying citizens and maintain the State’s advanced technical base. Finally, an effective, proprietary drug for the treatment of HD is expected to be highly valuable and to attract favorable financial terms upon out-licensing for development and commercialization. These revenues would flow to the California companies and institutions (including CIRM) that would have a stake in the proceeds.
Progress Report: 
  • The long-term objective for this project was to develop a first-in-class, disease-modifying drug to treat Huntington's disease (HD). This drug would comprise a small molecule that binds to and ameliorates the neurotoxicity of the mutant huntingtin protein (mHtt) that causes HD.
  • The goal of the research conducted under the CIRM Award was to demonstrate development candidate feasibility in vitro with a novel small molecule mHtt detoxifier early lead compound that is potent and efficacious in neurons from HD patients generated using stem cell technology (HD i-neurons) as well as suitable for use in mice as experimental models for HD.
  • The original project strategy was to 1) acquire or synthesize new samples of compounds identified as potential mHtt detoxifiers in the screening campaign conducted 7 years ago; 2) establish or re-establish the cell-free and cultured neuron biological assays needed to characterize potential small molecule mHtt detoxifiers (this work was carried out in the laboratory of our collaborator, Dr. Steven Finkbeiner of the J. David Gladstone Institutes); 3) acquire or synthesize new/novel analogs of the initial hits; 4) test new/novel compounds for activity in a cell-free assay for potential mHtt detoxifier activity; 5) test hits for efficacy in HD and non-HD i-neurons; and 6) profile the in vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetics and absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (PK/ADME) profiles of compounds that displayed selective neuroprotection toward HD i-neurons.
  • Specific achievements of the first year of the Project include:
  • • Acquiring 205 previously identified hits or analogs thereof from commercial sources;
  • • Synthesizing an additional 84 novel, designed analogs;
  • • Generating the reagents, re-establishing and implementing the screening assay;
  • • Testing all compounds acquired or synthesized in the screening assay;
  • • Establishing a counterscreen for false positives in the screening assay;
  • • Preliminary screening 48 previously reported hits in the counterscreen;
  • • Testing 14 previously or newly identified hits side-by-side in full concentration-response assays in both the screening and counterscreening assays;
  • • Profiling 11 diverse hits in in vitro PK/ADME assays;
  • • Testing 17 compounds for their ability to ameliorate neurotoxicity in a rodent primary neuron model; and
  • • Preliminary testing 2 previously identified hits in human HD i-neurons.
  • Unfortunately and surprisingly, we observed that all compounds displayed essentially identical profiles in full concentration-response studies in both the screening and counterscreening assays. We interpret this result to indicate that these compounds and structurally related compounds that we considered to be most promising and tested do not in fact bind to mHtt, i.e., they are all false positives. Since no valid starting points exist for continued work, the Project will be terminated after the first award period.

Progenitor Cells Secreting GDNF for the Treatment of ALS

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Development - Research
Grant Number: 
DR2A-05320
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$17 842 617
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
This project aims to use a powerful combined neural progenitor cell and growth factor approach to treat patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease). ALS is a devastating disease for which there is no treatment or cure. Progression from early muscle twitches to complete paralysis and death usually happens within 4 years. Every 90 minutes someone is diagnosed with ALS in the USA, and every 90 minutes someone dies from ALS. In California the death rate is one person every one and a half days. Human neural progenitor cells found early in brain development can be isolated and expanded in culture to large banks of billions of cell. When transplanted into animal models of ALS they have been shown to mature into support cells for dying motor neurons called astrocytes. In other studies, growth factors such as glial cell line-derived growth factor (or GDNF) have been shown to protect motor neurons from damage in a number of different animal models including ALS. However, delivering GDNF to the spinal cord has been almost impossible as it does not cross from the blood to the tissue of the spinal cord. The idea behind the current proposal is to modify human neural progenitor cells to produce GDNF and then transplant these cells into patients. There they act as “Trojan horses”, arriving at sick motor neurons and delivering the drug exactly where it is needed. A number of advances in human neural progenitor cell biology along with new surgical approaches have allowed us to create this disease team approach. The focus of the proposal will be to perform essential preclinical studies in relevant preclinical animal models that will establish optimal doses and safe procedures for translating this progenitor cell and growth factor therapy into human patients. The Phase 1/2a clinical study will inject the cells into one side of the lumbar spinal cord (that supplies the legs with neural impulses) of 12 ALS patients from the state of California. The progression in the treated leg vs. the non treated leg will be compared to see if the cells slow down progression of the disease. This is the first time a combined progenitor cell and growth factor treatment has been explored for patients with ALS.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
ALS is a devastating disease, and also puts a large burden on state resources through the need of full time care givers and hospital equipment. It is estimated that the cost of caring for an ALS patient in the late stage of disease while on a respiration is $200,000-300,000 per year. While primarily a humanitarian effort to avoid suffering, this project will also ease the cost of caring for ALS patients in California if ultimately successful. As the first trial in the world to combine progenitor cell and gene transfer of a growth factor, it will make California a center of excellence for these types of studies. This in turn will attract scientists, clinicians, and companies interested in this area of medicine to the state of California thus increasing state revenue and state prestige in the rapidly growing field of Regenerative Medicine.
Progress Report: 
  • ALS is a devastating disease for which there is no treatment or cure. Death of motor neurons in the spinal cord responsible for muscle function, results in complete paralysis and death usually within 2-4 years following diagnosis. This project will transplant stem cells secreting the powerful growth factor GDNF into the spinal cord of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease) do delay motor neuron death and thus treat the disease. In the first year we have (i) put together an outstanding team that have been able to begin the process of all pre clinical studies required to reach a new investigational drug (IND) filing within two years, (ii) generated a bank of research grade neural stem cells producing GDNF and developed manufacturing protocols at clinical grad level to produce the final lot of cells for the trial, (iii) performed complete dose ranging studies in a rat model of ALS to generate the first set of data showing safety and optimal doses for the cell product, (iv) optimized parameters to perform small and large animal safety studies required to take this work to the clinic and (v) assembled an outstanding team of clinicians and developed a world leading ALS clinic that is now preparing for patients to enter this trial. In the next year, we hope to complete the clinical grade lot of stem cells producing GDNF, to complete the remaining safety studies in rodent and pigs that will allow us to submit the IND application enabling a Phase 1/2a clinical study in 18 ALS patients from the state of California.

MSC engineered to produce BDNF for the treatment of Huntington's disease

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Development - Research
Grant Number: 
DR2A-05415
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$18 950 061
Disease Focus: 
Huntington's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
One in every ten thousand people in the USA has Huntington's disease, and it impacts many more. Multiple generations within a family can inherit the disease, resulting in escalating health care costs and draining family resources. This highly devastating and fatal disease touches all races and socioeconomic levels, and there are currently no cures. Screening for the mutant HD gene is available, but the at-risk children of an affected parent often do not wish to be tested since there are currently no early prevention strategies or effective treatments. We propose a novel therapy to treat HD; implantation of cells engineered to secrete Brain-Derived Neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a factor needed by neurons to remain alive and healthy, but which plummets to very low levels in HD patients due to interference by the mutant Huntingtin (htt) protein that is the hallmark of the disease. Intrastriatal implantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) has significant neurorestorative effects and is safe in animal models. We have discovered that MSC are remarkably effective delivery vehicles, moving robustly through the tissue and infusing therapeutic molecules into each damaged cell that they contact. Thus we are utilizing nature's own paramedic system, but we are arming them with enhanced neurotrophic factor secretion to enhance the health of at-risk neurons. Our novel animal models will allow the therapy to be carefully tested in preparation for a phase I clinical trial of MSC/BDNF infusion into the brain tissue of HD patients, with the goal of restoring the health of neurons that have been damaged by the mutant htt protein. Delivery of BDNF by MSC into the brains of HD mice is safe and has resulted in a significant reduction in their behavioral deficits, nearly back to normal levels. We are doing further work to ensure that the proposed therapy will be safe and effective, in preparation for the phase I clinical trial. The significance of our studies is very high because there are currently no treatments to diminish the unrelenting decline in the numbers of medium spiny neurons in the striata of patients affected by HD. Our biological delivery system for BDNF could also be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1), Alzheimer's Disease, and some forms of Parkinson's Disease, where neuroregeneration is needed. Development of novel stem cell therapies is extremely important for the community of HD and neurodegenerative disease researchers, patients, and families. Since HD patients unfortunately have few other options, the potential benefit to risk ratio for the planned trial is very high.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
It is estimated that one in 10,000 CA residents have Huntington’s disease (HD). While the financial burden of HD is estimated to be in the billions, the emotional cost to friends, families, and those with or at risk for HD is immeasurable. Health care costs are extremely high for HD patients due to the long progression of the disease, often for two decades. The lost ability of HD patients to remain in the CA workforce, to support their families, and to pay taxes causes additional financial strain on the state’s economy. HD is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, which means that 50% of the children of an HD patient will inherit the disease and will in turn pass it on to 50% of their children. Individuals diagnosed through genetic testing are at risk of losing insurance coverage in spite of reforms, and can be discriminated against for jobs, school, loans, or other applications. Since there are currently no cures or successful clinical trials to treat HD, many who are at risk are very reluctant to be tested. We are designing trials to treat HD through rescuing neurons in the earlier phases of the disease, before lives are devastated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been shown to have significant effects on restoring synaptic connections between damaged neurons, promoting neurite outgrowth, secreting anti-apoptotic factors in the brain, and regulating inflammation. In addition to many trials that have assessed the safety and efficacy of human MSC delivery to tissues via systemic IV infusion, MSC are also under consideration for treatment of disorders in the CNS, although few MSC clinical trials have started so far with direct delivery to brain or spinal cord tissue. Therefore we are conducting detailed studies in support of clinical trials that will feature MSC implantation into the brain, to deliver the neurotrophic factor BDNF that is lacking in HD. MSC can be transferred from one donor to the next without tissue matching because they shelter themselves from the immune system. We have demonstrated the safe and effective production of engineered molecules from human MSC for at least 18 months, in pre-clinical animal studies, and have shown with our collaborators that delivery of BDNF can have significant effects on reducing disease progression in HD rodent models. We are developing a therapeutic strategy to treat HD, since the need is so acute. HD patient advocates are admirably among the most vocal in California about their desire for CIRM-funded cures, attending almost every public meeting of the governing board of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). We are working carefully and intensely toward the planned FDA-approved approved cellular therapy for HD patients, which could have a major impact on those affected in California. In addition, the methods, preclinical testing models, and clinical trial design that we are developing could have far-reaching impact on the treatment of other neurodegenerative disorders.
Progress Report: 
  • Huntington’s disease (HD) is a hereditary, fatal neuropsychiatric disease. HD occurs in one in every ten thousand people in the USA. The effects of the disease on patients, families, and care givers are devastating as it reaches from generation to generation. This fatal disease touches all races and socioeconomic levels, and current treatment is strictly palliative. Existing drugs can reduce the involuntary movements and psychiatric symptoms, but do nothing to slow the inexorable progression. There is currently no cure for HD. People at risk of inheriting HD can undergo a genetic counseling and testing to learn if they are destined to develop this dreadful disease. Many people from HD families fear the consequences of stigma and genetic discrimination. Those at-risk often do not choose to be tested since there are currently no early prevention strategies or effective treatments.
  • We propose a novel therapy to treat HD: implantation of cells engineered to secrete Brain-Derived
  • Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), a factor that can promote addition of new neurons to the affected area of the brain. BDNF is reduced in HD patients due to interference by the mutant Huntingtin (htt) protein that is the hallmark of the disease. We have discovered that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC), a type of adult stem cell, are remarkably effective delivery vehicles, moving robustly through the tissue and infusing therapeutic molecules into damaged cells they contact. In animal models of HD implantation of MSC into the brain has significant neurorestorative effects and is safe. We propose to use these MSCs as “nature's own paramedic system”, arming them with BDNF to enhance the health of at-risk neurons. Our HD animal models will allow the therapy to be carefully tested in preparation for a proposed Phase I clinical trial of MSC/BDNF implantation into the brain of HD patients (HD-CELL), with the goal of slowing disease progression.
  • Delivery of BDNF by MSC into the brains of HD mice is safe and has resulted in a significant reduction in their behavioral deficits, nearly back to normal levels. We are doing further efficacy and safety studies in preparation for the Phase I clinical trial. The significance of our studies is very high because there are currently no other options, there is no current treatment to delay the onset or slow the progression of the disease.. There are potential applications beyond Huntington’s disease. Our biological delivery system for BDNF sets the precedent for adult stem cell therapy in the brain and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. Since HD patients unfortunately have few other options, the potential benefit to risk ratio for the planned trial is very high.
  • In the first year of our grant we have successfully engineered human MSCs to produce BDNF, and are studying effects on disease progression in HD mice. We have developed methods to produce these cells in large quantities to be used for future human clinical studies. As we go forward in year 2 we plan to complete the animal studies that will allow us to apply for regulatory approval to go forward with the planned Phase I trial.
  • We have designed an observational study, PRE-CELL, to track disease progression and generate useful data in preparation for this future planned Phase I clinical trial. PRE-CELL has been approved by the institution’s ethics board and is currently enrolling subjects. PRE-CELL was designed to operate concurrently with the ongoing pre-clinical safety testing. For additional information go to: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01937923

Role of the NMD RNA Decay Pathway in Maintaining the Stem-Like State

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-06345
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 360 450
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
A subset of intellectual disability cases in humans are caused by mutations in an X-linked gene essential for a quality control mechanism called nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD). Patients with mutations in this gene—UPF3B—commonly have not only ID, but also schizophrenia, autism, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Thus, the study of UPF3B and NMD may provide insight into a wide spectrum of cognitive and psychological disorders. To examine how mutations in UPF3B can cause mental defects, we will generate and characterize induced-pluripotent stem cells from intellectual disability patients with mutations in the UPF3B gene. In addition to having a role in neural development, our recent evidence suggests that NMD is important for maintaining the identity of ES cells and progenitor cells. How does NMD do this? While NMD is a quality control mechanism, it is also a well characterized biochemical pathway that serves to rapidly degrade specific subsets of normal messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNAs), the transiently produced copies of our genetic material: deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). We have obtained evidence that NMD preferentially degrades mRNAs that interfere with the stem cell program (i.e., NMD promotes the decay mRNAs encoding proteins that promote differentiation and inhibit cell proliferation). In this proposal, we will identify the target mRNAs of NMD in stem and progenitor cells and directly address the role of NMD in maintaining the stem-like state.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
iPS cells provide a means to elucidate the mechanisms underlying diseases that afflict a growing number of Californians. Our proposed project concerns making and testing iPS cells from patients with mutations in the UPF3B gene, all of whom have intellectual disabilities. In addition, many of these patients have autism, attention-deficit disorders, and schizophrenia. By using iPS cells to identify the cellular and molecular defects in these patients, we have the potential to ultimately ameliorate the symptoms of many of these patients. This is important, as over 1.6 million people in California have serious mental illness. Moreover, a large proportion of patients with UPF3B mutations have autism, a disorder that has undergone an alarming 12-fold increase in California between 1987 and 2007. The public mental health facilities in California are inadequate to meet the needs of people with mental health disorders. Furthermore, what is provided is expensive: $4.4 billion was spent on public mental health agency services in California in 2006. Mental health problems also exert a heavy burden on California’s criminal justice system. In 2006, over 11,000 children and 40,000 adults with mental health disorders were incarcerated in California’s juvenile justice system. Our research is also directed towards understanding fundamental mechanisms by which all stem cells are maintained, which has the potential to also impact non-psychiatric disorders suffered by Californians.
Progress Report: 
  • A key quality of stem cells is their ability to switch from a proliferative cell state in which they reproduce themselves to a differentiated cell state that ultimately allows them to carry out the functions of a fully mature cell. Most research on the nature of this switch has focused on the role of proteins that determine whether the genetic material—DNA—generates a copy of it itself in the form of messenger RNA, a process called transcription. In stem cells, such proteins—which are called transcription factors—activate the production of messenger RNAs encoding proteins that promote the proliferative and undifferentiated cell state. They also increase the production of messenger mRNAs that encode inhibitors of differentiation and cell proliferation. The level and profile of such transcription factors are altered in response to signals that trigger stem cells to differentiate. For example, transcription factors that promote the undifferentiated cell state are decreased in level and transcription factors that drive differentiation down a particular lineage are increased in level. While this transcription factor-centric view of stem cells explains some aspects of stem cell biology, it is, in of itself, insufficient to explain many of their behaviors, including both their ability to maintain the stem-like state and to differentiate. We hypothesize that a molecular pathway that complements transcription-base mechanisms in controlling stem cell maintenance vs. differentiation decisions is an RNA decay pathway called nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD). Messenger RNA decay is as important as transcription in determining the level of messenger RNA. Signals that trigger increased decay of a given messenger RNA leads to decreased levels of its encoded protein, while signals that trigger the opposite response increase the level of the encoded protein. Our project revolves around two main ideas. First, that NMD promotes the stem-like state by preferentially degrading messenger RNAs that encode differentiation-promoting proteins and proliferation inhibitor proteins. Second, that NMD must be downregulated in magnitude to allow stem cells to differentiate. During the progress period, we obtained substantial evidence for both of these hypotheses. With regard to the first hypothesis, we have used genome-wide approaches to identify hundreds of messenger RNAs that are regulated by NMD in both in vivo (in mice) and in vitro (in cell lines). To determine which of these messenger mRNAs are directly degraded by NMD, we have used a variety of approaches. This work has revealed that NMD preferentially degrades messenger RNAs encoding neural differentiation inhibitors and proliferation inhibitors in neural stem cells. In contrast, very few messenger RNAs encoding pro-stem cell proteins or pro-proliferation proteins are degraded by NMD. Together this provides support for our hypothesis that NMD promotes the stem-like state by shifting the proportion of messenger RNAs in a cell towards promoting an undifferentiated, proliferative cell state. With regard to the second hypothesis, we have found that many proteins that are directly involved in the NMD pathway are downregulated upon differentiation of stem and progenitor cells. Not only are NMD proteins reduced in level, but we find that the magnitude of NMD itself is reduced. We have used a variety of molecular techniques to determine whether this NMD downregulatory response has a role in neural differentiation and found that NMD downreglation is both necessary and sufficient for this event. Such experiments have also revealed particular messenger mRNAs degraded by NMD that are crucial for the NMD downregulatory response to promote neural differentiation. Our research has implications for intellectual disability cases in humans caused by mutations in an X-linked gene essential for NMD. Patients with mutations in this gene—UPF3B—not only have intellectual disability, but also schizophrenia, autism, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Thus, the study of NMD may provide insight into a wide spectrum of cognitive and psychological disorders. We are currently in the process of generating induced-pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from intellectual disability patients with mutations in the UPF3B gene towards this goal.
  • A key quality of stem cells is their ability to switch from a proliferative cell state in which they reproduce themselves to a differentiated cell state that ultimately allows them to carry out the functions of a fully mature cell. Most research on the nature of this switch has focused on the role of proteins that determine whether the genetic material—DNA—generates a copy of it itself in the form of messenger RNA, a process called transcription. In stem cells, such proteins—which are called transcription factors—activate the production of messenger RNAs encoding proteins that promote the proliferative and undifferentiated cell state. They also increase the production of messenger mRNAs that encode inhibitors of differentiation and cell proliferation. The level and profile of such transcription factors are altered in response to signals that trigger stem cells to differentiate. For example, transcription factors that promote the undifferentiated cell state are decreased in level and transcription factors that drive differentiation down a particular lineage are increased in level. While this transcription factor-centric view of stem cells explains some aspects of stem cell biology, it is, in of itself, insufficient to explain many of their behaviors, including both their ability to maintain the stem-like state and to differentiate. We hypothesize that a molecular pathway that complements transcription-base mechanisms in controlling stem cell maintenance vs. differentiation decisions is an RNA decay pathway called nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD). Messenger RNA decay is as important as transcription in determining the level of messenger RNA. Signals that trigger increased decay of a given messenger RNA leads to decreased levels of its encoded protein, while signals that trigger the opposite response increase the level of the encoded protein. Our project revolves around two main ideas. First, that NMD promotes the stem-like state by preferentially degrading messenger RNAs that encode differentiation-promoting proteins and proliferation inhibitor proteins. Second, that NMD must be downregulated in magnitude to allow stem cells to differentiate. During the progress period, we obtained substantial evidence for both of these hypotheses. With regard to the first hypothesis, we have used genome-wide approaches to identify hundreds of messenger RNAs that are regulated by NMD in both in vivo (in mice) and in vitro (in cell lines). To determine which of these messenger mRNAs are directly degraded by NMD, we have used a variety of approaches. This work has revealed that NMD preferentially degrades messenger RNAs encoding neural differentiation inhibitors and proliferation inhibitors in neural stem cells. In contrast, very few messenger RNAs encoding pro-stem cell proteins or pro-proliferation proteins are degraded by NMD. Together this provides support for our hypothesis that NMD promotes the stem-like state by shifting the proportion of messenger RNAs in a cell towards promoting an undifferentiated, proliferative cell state. During the progress period, we have obtained considerable evidence that this hypothesis not only applies to mouse stem cells but also human embryonic stem cells. With regard to the second hypothesis, we have found that many proteins that are directly involved in the NMD pathway are downregulated upon differentiation of stem and progenitor cells. Not only are NMD proteins reduced in level, but we find that the magnitude of NMD itself is reduced. We have used a variety of molecular techniques to determine whether this NMD downregulatory response has a role in neural differentiation and found that NMD downreglation is both necessary and sufficient for this event. Such experiments have also revealed particular messenger mRNAs degraded by NMD that are crucial for the NMD downregulatory response to promote neural differentiation. During the progress period, we obtained both experimental and genome-wide data that this applies to human embryonic stem cells. Our research has implications for intellectual disability cases in humans caused by mutations in an X-linked gene essential for NMD. Patients with mutations in this gene—UPF3B—not only have intellectual disability, but also schizophrenia, autism, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Thus, the study of NMD may provide insight into a wide spectrum of cognitive and psychological disorders. We are currently in the process of generating and characterizing induced-pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from intellectual disability patients with mutations in the UPF3B gene towards this goal.

Banking transplant ready dopaminergic neurons using a scalable process

Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01856
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$6 016 624
Disease Focus: 
Parkinson's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Collaborative Funder: 
Maryland
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating movement disorder caused by the death of dopaminergic neurons (a type of nerve cells in the central nervous system) present in the midbrain. These neurons secrete dopamine (a signaling molecule) and are a critical component of the motor circuit that ensures movements are smooth and coordinated. All current treatments attempt to overcome the loss of these neurons by either replacing the lost dopamine, or modulating other parts of the circuit to balance this loss or attempting to halt or delay the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Cell replacement therapy (that is, transplantation of dopaminergic neurons into the brain to replace lost cells and restore function) as proposed in this application attempts to use cells as small pumps of dopamine that will be secreted locally and in a regulated way, and will therefore avoid the complications of other modes of treatment. Indeed, cell therapy using fetal tissue-derived cells have been shown to be successful in multiple transplant studies. Work in the field has been limited however, partially due to the limited availability of cells for transplantation (e.g., 6-10 fetuses of 6-10 weeks post-conception are required for a single patient). We believe that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) may offer a potentially unlimited source of the right kind of cell required for cell replacement therapy. Work in our laboratories and in others has allowed us to develop a process of directing hESC differentiation into dopaminergic neurons. To move forward stem cell-based therapy development it is important to develop scale-up GMP-compatible process of generating therapeutically relevant cells (dopaminergic neurons in this case). The overall goal of this proposal is to develop a hESC-based therapeutic candidate (dopaminergic neurons) by developing enabling reagents/tools/processes that will allow us to translate our efforts into clinical use. We have used PD as a model but throughout the application have focused on generalized enabling tools. The tools, reagents and processes we will develop in this project will allow us to move towards translational therapy and establish processes that could be applied to future IND-enabling projects. In addition, the processes we will develop would be of benefit to the CIRM community.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Parkinson’s disease affects more than a million patients United States with a large fraction being present in California. California, which is the home of the Parkinson’s Institute and several Parkinson’s related foundations and patient advocacy groups, has been at the forefront of this research and a large number of California based scientists supported by these foundations and CIRM have contributed to significant breakthroughs in this field. In this application we and our collaborators in California aim propose to develop a hESC-based therapeutic candidate (dopaminergic neurons) that will allow us to move towards translational therapy and establish processes that could be applied to future IND-enabling projects for this currently non-curable disorder. We believe that this proposal includes the basic elements that are required for the translation of basic research to clinical research. We believe these experiments not only provide a blueprint for moving Parkinson’s disease towards the clinic for people suffering with the disorder but also a generalized blueprint for the development of stem cell therapy for multiple neurological disorders including motor neuron diseases and spinal cord injury. The tools and reagents that we develop will be made widely available to Californian researchers. We expect that the money expended on this research will benefit the Californian research community and the tools and reagents we develop will help accelerate the research of our colleagues in both California and worldwide.
Progress Report: 
  • Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating movement disorder caused by the death of dopaminergic neurons (a type of nerve cells in the central nervous system) present in the midbrain. These neurons secrete dopamine (a signaling molecule) and are a critical component of the motor circuit that ensures movements are smooth and coordinated.
  • All current treatments attempt to overcome the loss of these neurons by either replacing the lost dopamine, or modulating other parts of the circuit to balance this loss or attempting to halt or delay the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Cell replacement therapy (that is, transplantation of dopaminergic neurons into the brain to replace lost cells and restore function) as proposed in this application attempts to use cells as small pumps of dopamine that will be secreted locally and in a regulated way, and will therefore avoid the complications of other modes of treatment. Indeed, cell therapy using fetal tissue-derived cells have been shown to be successful in multiple transplant studies. Work in the field has been limited however, partially due to the limited availability of cells for transplantation (e.g., 6-10 fetuses of 6-10 weeks post-conception are required for a single patient).
  • We believe that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) may offer a potentially unlimited source of the right kind of cell required for cell replacement therapy. Work in our laboratories and in others has allowed us to develop a process of directing hESC differentiation into dopaminergic neurons. To move forward stem cell-based therapy development it is important to develop scale-up GMP-compatible process of generating therapeutically relevant cells (dopaminergic neurons in this case).
  • The overall goal of this proposal is to develop a hESC-based therapeutic candidate (dopaminergic neurons) by developing enabling reagents/tools/processes that will allow us to translate our efforts into clinical use. We have used PD as a model but throughout the application have focused on generalized enabling tools. The tools, reagents and processes we will develop in this project will allow us to move towards translational therapy and establish processes that could be applied to future IND-enabling projects. In addition, the processes we will develop would be of benefit to the CIRM community.
  • Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating movement disorder caused by the death of dopaminergic neurons (a type of nerve cells in the central nervous system) present in the midbrain. These neurons secrete dopamine (a signaling molecule) and are a critical component of the motor circuit that ensures movements are smooth and coordinated.
  • All current treatments attempt to overcome the loss of these neurons by either replacing the lost dopamine, or modulating other parts of the circuit to balance this loss or attempting to halt or delay the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Cell replacement therapy (that is, transplantation of dopaminergic neurons into the brain to replace lost cells and restore function) as proposed in this application attempts to use cells as small pumps of dopamine that will be secreted locally and in a regulated way, and will therefore avoid the complications of other modes of treatment. Indeed, cell therapy using fetal tissue-derived cells have been shown to be successful in multiple transplant studies. Work in the field has been limited however, partially due to the limited availability of cells for transplantation (e.g., 6-10 fetuses of 6-10 weeks post-conception are required for a single patient).
  • We believe that human pluripotent stem cells (PSC) may offer a potentially unlimited source of the right kind of cell required for cell replacement therapy. Work in our laboratories and in others has allowed us to develop a process of directing PSC differentiation into dopaminergic neurons. To move forward stem cell-based therapy development it is important to develop scale-up GMP-compatible process of generating therapeutically relevant cells (dopaminergic neurons in this case).
  • During this grant, we have optimized a step-wise scalable process for generating authentic dopaminergic neurons in defined media from human PSC, and have determined the time point at which dopaminergic neurons can be frozen, shipped, thawed and transplanted without compromising their ability to mature and provide therapeutic benefit in animal models. Our process has been successfully transferred to a GMP facility and we have manufactured multiple lots of GMP-equivalent cells using this process. Importantly, we have shown functional equivalency of the manufactured cells in appropriate models. The tools, reagents and processes we have developed in this project allow us to move towards translational therapy and establish processes that could be applied to future IND-enabling projects. In addition, the processes we have developed would be of benefit to the CIRM community.
  • CIRM Progress Report Part A: Scientific Progress
  • I. Project Overview
  • During the past three years (36 months) we have successfully completed the milestones defined in the NGA for this grant. In brief, we have selected 1 clinically compliant ESC line H14 (and a back-up line H9), which have shown reproducible, efficient differentiation to dopaminergic neurons at lab scale. We have performed in vitro and in vivo characterization as defined in the NGA and guided by our discussion with our program officer at CIRM. We have determined the time point at which dopaminergic precursors (14 days after the NSC stage) can be frozen, shipped, thawed and transplanted without compromising their ability to mature and provide therapeutic benefit in animal models. Importantly, we have evaluated efficacy of cryopreserved dopaminergic precursors manufactured by the GMP-compatible process in a rodent PD model and shown functional recovery up to 6 months post transplantation as well as survival of dopaminergic neurons.
  • In the meanwhile we have successfully transferred the process of generating transplant ready dopaminergic neurons to the manufacture facilities at City of Hope (COH). They have adapted and optimized our protocols and have established GMP-compatible protocols for the culture of ESC-NSC and for differentiating NSC to Stage 3, Day 14 DA precursors for transplantation. During this reporting period (36 month), we have tested the equivalency of these lots and confirmed that lots manufactured at COH are consistent and similar to cells produced in the laboratory.
  • Our effort resulted in two important manuscripts in Cytotherapy:
  • 1. Liu, Q., Pedersen, OZ., Peng, J., Couture, LA., Rao, MS., and Zeng, X. Optimizing dopaminergic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells for the manufacture of dopaminergic neurons for transplantation. Cytotherapy. 2013 Aug;15(8):999-1010.
  • 2. Peng, J., Liu, Q., Rao, MS., and Zeng, X. Survival and engraftment of dopaminergic neurons manufactured by a GMP-compatible process. Cytotherapy. 2014 Sep;16(9):1305-12.

Developing a therapeutic candidate for Canavan disease using induced pluripotent stem cell

Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01832
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 835 983
Disease Focus: 
Genetic Disorder
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
Collaborative Funder: 
Germany
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Canavan disease is a devastating disease of infants which affects their neural development and leads to mental retardation and early death. It occurs in 1 in 6,400 persons in the U.S. and there is no treatment so far. We propose to generate genetically-repaired and patient-specific stem cells (called iPSCs) from patients’ skin cells, and then coax these stem cells into specific types of corrective neural precursors using methods established in our laboratories in order to develop a therapeutic candidate for this disease. By use of a mouse model of Canavan disease, we will determine the ability of these genetically corrected cells to successfully treat the disease. These results will form the basis for an eventual clinical trial in humans, and if successful, would be the first treatment for this terrible disease. There are many families affected by this disease, and other diseases similar to it. Results from this work could have applications to this and other similar genetic diseases. Through the proposed research, maybe no parents will have to watch their child suffer and die as a result of these dreadful diseases in one day. What a wonderful day that would be!
Statement of Benefit to California: 
It is estimated that California has ~12% of all cases of Canavan disease in the U.S. Besides the tremendous emotional and physical pain that this disease inflicts on families, it produces in California a medical and fiscal burden that is larger than any other states. Thus, there is a real need to develop a strategy of treatment for this disease. Stem cells provide great hope for the treatment of a variety of human diseases that affect the citizens of California. Combination of gene therapy and iPSC technology will enable the development of therapeutic candidates of human genetic diseases via the creation of genetically-corrected patient-specific iPSCs. Our proposal aims to establish a therapeutic development candidate for Canavan disease, a devastating neurodegenerative disease that leads to mental retardation and early death. The generation of genetically-repaired and patient-specific iPSC lines will represent great potential not only for California health care patients but also for pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries in California. Moreover, California is a strong leader in pre-clinical and clinical research developments. To maintain this position, we need to create patient-specific stem cells as autologous therapeutic candidates, in order to overcome the challenges of immune rejection faced by today’s cell therapy field. This proposal addresses the very issue by generating “disease-corrected” and patient-specific iPSCs as a therapeutic candidate with the potential to create safer and more effective cell replacement therapies.
Progress Report: 
  • Canavan disease is a devastating disease of infants which affects their neural development and leads to mental retardation and early death. It occurs in 1 in 6,400 persons in the U.S. and there is no treatment so far. We propose to generate genetically-repaired and patient-specific stem cells (called iPSCs) from patients’ skin cells, and then coax these stem cells into specific types of corrective neural precursors using methods established in our laboratories in order to develop a therapeutic candidate for this disease.
  • For the reporting period, we have obtained primary dermal fibroblasts from clinically affected Canavan disease patients and have derived Canavan disease patient iPSCs. We have demonstrated that these iPSCs exhibited typical human embryonic stem cell (ESC) like morphology, expressed human ESC cell surface markers and hold pluripotency potential. We are also optimizing methods to coax these cells into specific types of neural precursors. Either the patient iPSCs or their neural precursor derivatives will be genetically corrected in the following years to develop a therapeutic tool for Canavan disease patients.
  • There are many families affected by this disease, and other diseases similar to it. Results from this work could have applications to this and other similar genetic diseases. Through the proposed research, maybe no parents will have to watch their child suffer and die as a result of these dreadful diseases in one day.
  • Canavan disease is a devastating disease of infants which affects their neural development and leads to mental retardation and early death. It occurs in 1 in 6,400 persons in the U.S. and there is no treatment so far. We propose to generate genetically-repaired and patient-specific stem cells (called iPSCs) from patients’ skin cells, and then coax these stem cells into specific types of corrective neural precursors using methods established in our laboratories in order to develop a therapeutic candidate for this disease.
  • For the reporting period, we have demonstrated that the Canavan disease patient iPSCs hold pluripotency potential. We also genetically corrected the patient iPSCs and demonstrated that these genetically-corrected cells maintained human embryonic stem cell-like features. We coaxed these cells into specific types of neural precursors and showed that the genetically-corrected patient cells restored their cellular function. These genetically corrected cells will be tested for their therapeutic effect in the next year, in order to develop a therapeutic tool for Canavan disease patients.
  • There are many families affected by this disease, and other diseases similar to it. Results from this work could have applications to this and other similar genetic diseases. Through the proposed research, maybe no parents will have to watch their child suffer and die as a result of these dreadful diseases in one day.
  • Canavan disease is a devastating disease of infants which affects their neural development and leads to mental retardation and early death. It occurs in 1 in 6,400 persons in the U.S. and there is no treatment so far. We propose to generate genetically-repaired and patient-specific stem cells (called iPSCs) from patients’ skin cells, and then coax these stem cells into specific types of corrective neural precursors using methods established in our laboratories in order to develop a therapeutic candidate for this disease.
  • We have demonstrated that the Canavan disease patient iPSCs hold pluripotency potential. We also genetically corrected the patient iPSCs and demonstrated that these genetically-corrected cells maintained human embryonic stem cell-like features. We coaxed these cells into specific types of neural precursors and showed that the genetically-corrected patient cells restored their cellular function.
  • For the reporting period, we provided evidence that the genetically-corrected patient iPSC-derived neural precursors were able to produce myelin binding protein in an animal model. We also characterized the Canavan disease mice to show that they exhibited the characteristic Canavan disease patient phenotypes. The genetically corrected cells will be tested in Canavan disease mice for their therapeutic effect in the next funding period, in order to develop a therapeutic tool for Canavan disease patients.
  • There are many families affected by this disease, and other diseases similar to it. Results from this work could have applications to this and other similar genetic diseases. Through the proposed research, maybe no parents will have to watch their child suffer and die as a result of these dreadful diseases in one day.

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