Neurological Disorders

Coding Dimension ID: 
303
Coding Dimension path name: 
Neurological Disorders

Multiple Sclerosis therapy: Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Progenitor Cells

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05603
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$4 799 814
Disease Focus: 
Multiple Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) caused by inflammation and loss of cells that produce myelin, which normally insulates and protects nerve cells. MS is a leading cause of neurological disability among young adults in North America. Current treatments for MS include drugs such as interferons and corticosteroids that modulate the ability of immune system cells to invade the CNS. These therapies often have unsatisfactory outcomes, with continued progression of neurologic disability over time. This is most likely due to irreversible tissue injury resulting from permanent loss of myelin and nerve destruction. The limited ability of the body to repair damaged nerve tissue highlights a critically important and unmet need for MS patients. The long-term goal of our research is to develop a stem cell-based therapy that will not only halt ongoing loss of myelin but also lead to remyelination and repair of damaged nerve tissue. Our preliminary data in animal models of human MS are very promising and suggest that this goal is possible. Research efforts will concentrate on refining techniques for production and rigorous quality control of clinically-compatible transplantable cells generated from high-quality human pluripotent stem cell lines, and to verify the therapeutic activity of these cells. We will emphasize safety and development of the most therapeutically beneficial cell type for eventual use in patients with MS.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
One in seven Americans lives in California, and these people make up the single largest health care market in the United States. The diseases and injuries that affect Californians affect the rest of the US and the world. Many of these diseases involve degeneration of healthy cells and tissues, including neuronal tissue in diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The best estimates indicate that there are 400,000 people diagnosed with MS in the USA and 2.2 million worldwide. In California, there are approximately 160,000 people with MS – roughly half of MS patients in the US live in California. MS is a life-long, chronic disease diagnosed primarily in young adults who have a virtually normal life expectancy but suffer from progressive loss of motor and cognitive function. Consequently, the economic, social and medical costs associated with the disease are significant. Estimates place the annual cost of MS in the United States in the billions of dollars. The development of a stem cell therapy for treatment of MS patients will not only alleviate ongoing suffering but also allow people afflicted with this disease to return to work and contribute to the economic stabilization of California. Moreover, a stem cell-based therapy that will provide sustained recovery will reduce recurrence and the ever-growing cost burden to the California medical community.
Progress Report: 
  • The team has been highly productive during the first year of work on this award. A major goal of the project is to evaluate the efficacy of neural progenitor cell transplantation to promote remyelination following virus induced central nervous system damage. With intracranial infection by the virus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), mice develop paralysis due to immune mediated destruction of cells that generate myelin. Using protocols developed in the Loring laboratory, neural precursor cells (NPC) were derived from the human embryonic stem cell line H9. Mice developing paralysis due to intracranial infection with MHV were subject to intraspinal transplantation of these NPC, resulting in significant clinical recovery beginning at 2-3 weeks following transplant. This clinical effect of NPC transplantation remained out to six months, suggesting that these NPC are effective for long-term repair following demyelination. Despite this striking recovery, these human ES cell derived NPC were rapidly rejected. Several protocols for the generation of NPC for transplantation have been characterized, with the greatest clinical impact observed for NPC cultures bearing a high level of expression of TGF beta I and TGF beta II. These findings support the hypothesis that transplanted NPC reprogram the immune system within the central nervous system (CNS), leading to the activation of endogenous NPC and other repair mechanisms. Thus, it may not be necessary to induce complete immune suppression in order to promote remyelination and CNS repair following NPC transplantation for demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

Progenitor Cells Secreting GDNF for the Treatment of ALS

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Development - Research
Grant Number: 
DR2A-05320
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$17 842 617
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
This project aims to use a powerful combined neural progenitor cell and growth factor approach to treat patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease). ALS is a devastating disease for which there is no treatment or cure. Progression from early muscle twitches to complete paralysis and death usually happens within 4 years. Every 90 minutes someone is diagnosed with ALS in the USA, and every 90 minutes someone dies from ALS. In California the death rate is one person every one and a half days. Human neural progenitor cells found early in brain development can be isolated and expanded in culture to large banks of billions of cell. When transplanted into animal models of ALS they have been shown to mature into support cells for dying motor neurons called astrocytes. In other studies, growth factors such as glial cell line-derived growth factor (or GDNF) have been shown to protect motor neurons from damage in a number of different animal models including ALS. However, delivering GDNF to the spinal cord has been almost impossible as it does not cross from the blood to the tissue of the spinal cord. The idea behind the current proposal is to modify human neural progenitor cells to produce GDNF and then transplant these cells into patients. There they act as “Trojan horses”, arriving at sick motor neurons and delivering the drug exactly where it is needed. A number of advances in human neural progenitor cell biology along with new surgical approaches have allowed us to create this disease team approach. The focus of the proposal will be to perform essential preclinical studies in relevant preclinical animal models that will establish optimal doses and safe procedures for translating this progenitor cell and growth factor therapy into human patients. The Phase 1/2a clinical study will inject the cells into one side of the lumbar spinal cord (that supplies the legs with neural impulses) of 12 ALS patients from the state of California. The progression in the treated leg vs. the non treated leg will be compared to see if the cells slow down progression of the disease. This is the first time a combined progenitor cell and growth factor treatment has been explored for patients with ALS.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
ALS is a devastating disease, and also puts a large burden on state resources through the need of full time care givers and hospital equipment. It is estimated that the cost of caring for an ALS patient in the late stage of disease while on a respiration is $200,000-300,000 per year. While primarily a humanitarian effort to avoid suffering, this project will also ease the cost of caring for ALS patients in California if ultimately successful. As the first trial in the world to combine progenitor cell and gene transfer of a growth factor, it will make California a center of excellence for these types of studies. This in turn will attract scientists, clinicians, and companies interested in this area of medicine to the state of California thus increasing state revenue and state prestige in the rapidly growing field of Regenerative Medicine.
Progress Report: 
  • ALS is a devastating disease for which there is no treatment or cure. Death of motor neurons in the spinal cord responsible for muscle function, results in complete paralysis and death usually within 2-4 years following diagnosis. This project will transplant stem cells secreting the powerful growth factor GDNF into the spinal cord of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease) do delay motor neuron death and thus treat the disease. In the first year we have (i) put together an outstanding team that have been able to begin the process of all pre clinical studies required to reach a new investigational drug (IND) filing within two years, (ii) generated a bank of research grade neural stem cells producing GDNF and developed manufacturing protocols at clinical grad level to produce the final lot of cells for the trial, (iii) performed complete dose ranging studies in a rat model of ALS to generate the first set of data showing safety and optimal doses for the cell product, (iv) optimized parameters to perform small and large animal safety studies required to take this work to the clinic and (v) assembled an outstanding team of clinicians and developed a world leading ALS clinic that is now preparing for patients to enter this trial. In the next year, we hope to complete the clinical grade lot of stem cells producing GDNF, to complete the remaining safety studies in rodent and pigs that will allow us to submit the IND application enabling a Phase 1/2a clinical study in 18 ALS patients from the state of California.

MSC engineered to produce BDNF for the treatment of Huntington's disease

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Development - Research
Grant Number: 
DR2A-05415
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$18 950 061
Disease Focus: 
Huntington's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
One in every ten thousand people in the USA has Huntington's disease, and it impacts many more. Multiple generations within a family can inherit the disease, resulting in escalating health care costs and draining family resources. This highly devastating and fatal disease touches all races and socioeconomic levels, and there are currently no cures. Screening for the mutant HD gene is available, but the at-risk children of an affected parent often do not wish to be tested since there are currently no early prevention strategies or effective treatments. We propose a novel therapy to treat HD; implantation of cells engineered to secrete Brain-Derived Neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a factor needed by neurons to remain alive and healthy, but which plummets to very low levels in HD patients due to interference by the mutant Huntingtin (htt) protein that is the hallmark of the disease. Intrastriatal implantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) has significant neurorestorative effects and is safe in animal models. We have discovered that MSC are remarkably effective delivery vehicles, moving robustly through the tissue and infusing therapeutic molecules into each damaged cell that they contact. Thus we are utilizing nature's own paramedic system, but we are arming them with enhanced neurotrophic factor secretion to enhance the health of at-risk neurons. Our novel animal models will allow the therapy to be carefully tested in preparation for a phase I clinical trial of MSC/BDNF infusion into the brain tissue of HD patients, with the goal of restoring the health of neurons that have been damaged by the mutant htt protein. Delivery of BDNF by MSC into the brains of HD mice is safe and has resulted in a significant reduction in their behavioral deficits, nearly back to normal levels. We are doing further work to ensure that the proposed therapy will be safe and effective, in preparation for the phase I clinical trial. The significance of our studies is very high because there are currently no treatments to diminish the unrelenting decline in the numbers of medium spiny neurons in the striata of patients affected by HD. Our biological delivery system for BDNF could also be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1), Alzheimer's Disease, and some forms of Parkinson's Disease, where neuroregeneration is needed. Development of novel stem cell therapies is extremely important for the community of HD and neurodegenerative disease researchers, patients, and families. Since HD patients unfortunately have few other options, the potential benefit to risk ratio for the planned trial is very high.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
It is estimated that one in 10,000 CA residents have Huntington’s disease (HD). While the financial burden of HD is estimated to be in the billions, the emotional cost to friends, families, and those with or at risk for HD is immeasurable. Health care costs are extremely high for HD patients due to the long progression of the disease, often for two decades. The lost ability of HD patients to remain in the CA workforce, to support their families, and to pay taxes causes additional financial strain on the state’s economy. HD is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, which means that 50% of the children of an HD patient will inherit the disease and will in turn pass it on to 50% of their children. Individuals diagnosed through genetic testing are at risk of losing insurance coverage in spite of reforms, and can be discriminated against for jobs, school, loans, or other applications. Since there are currently no cures or successful clinical trials to treat HD, many who are at risk are very reluctant to be tested. We are designing trials to treat HD through rescuing neurons in the earlier phases of the disease, before lives are devastated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been shown to have significant effects on restoring synaptic connections between damaged neurons, promoting neurite outgrowth, secreting anti-apoptotic factors in the brain, and regulating inflammation. In addition to many trials that have assessed the safety and efficacy of human MSC delivery to tissues via systemic IV infusion, MSC are also under consideration for treatment of disorders in the CNS, although few MSC clinical trials have started so far with direct delivery to brain or spinal cord tissue. Therefore we are conducting detailed studies in support of clinical trials that will feature MSC implantation into the brain, to deliver the neurotrophic factor BDNF that is lacking in HD. MSC can be transferred from one donor to the next without tissue matching because they shelter themselves from the immune system. We have demonstrated the safe and effective production of engineered molecules from human MSC for at least 18 months, in pre-clinical animal studies, and have shown with our collaborators that delivery of BDNF can have significant effects on reducing disease progression in HD rodent models. We are developing a therapeutic strategy to treat HD, since the need is so acute. HD patient advocates are admirably among the most vocal in California about their desire for CIRM-funded cures, attending almost every public meeting of the governing board of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). We are working carefully and intensely toward the planned FDA-approved approved cellular therapy for HD patients, which could have a major impact on those affected in California. In addition, the methods, preclinical testing models, and clinical trial design that we are developing could have far-reaching impact on the treatment of other neurodegenerative disorders.
Progress Report: 
  • Huntington’s disease (HD) is a hereditary, fatal neuropsychiatric disease. HD occurs in one in every ten thousand people in the USA. The effects of the disease on patients, families, and care givers are devastating as it reaches from generation to generation. This fatal disease touches all races and socioeconomic levels, and current treatment is strictly palliative. Existing drugs can reduce the involuntary movements and psychiatric symptoms, but do nothing to slow the inexorable progression. There is currently no cure for HD. People at risk of inheriting HD can undergo a genetic counseling and testing to learn if they are destined to develop this dreadful disease. Many people from HD families fear the consequences of stigma and genetic discrimination. Those at-risk often do not choose to be tested since there are currently no early prevention strategies or effective treatments.
  • We propose a novel therapy to treat HD: implantation of cells engineered to secrete Brain-Derived
  • Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), a factor that can promote addition of new neurons to the affected area of the brain. BDNF is reduced in HD patients due to interference by the mutant Huntingtin (htt) protein that is the hallmark of the disease. We have discovered that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC), a type of adult stem cell, are remarkably effective delivery vehicles, moving robustly through the tissue and infusing therapeutic molecules into damaged cells they contact. In animal models of HD implantation of MSC into the brain has significant neurorestorative effects and is safe. We propose to use these MSCs as “nature's own paramedic system”, arming them with BDNF to enhance the health of at-risk neurons. Our HD animal models will allow the therapy to be carefully tested in preparation for a proposed Phase I clinical trial of MSC/BDNF implantation into the brain of HD patients (HD-CELL), with the goal of slowing disease progression.
  • Delivery of BDNF by MSC into the brains of HD mice is safe and has resulted in a significant reduction in their behavioral deficits, nearly back to normal levels. We are doing further efficacy and safety studies in preparation for the Phase I clinical trial. The significance of our studies is very high because there are currently no other options, there is no current treatment to delay the onset or slow the progression of the disease.. There are potential applications beyond Huntington’s disease. Our biological delivery system for BDNF sets the precedent for adult stem cell therapy in the brain and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. Since HD patients unfortunately have few other options, the potential benefit to risk ratio for the planned trial is very high.
  • In the first year of our grant we have successfully engineered human MSCs to produce BDNF, and are studying effects on disease progression in HD mice. We have developed methods to produce these cells in large quantities to be used for future human clinical studies. As we go forward in year 2 we plan to complete the animal studies that will allow us to apply for regulatory approval to go forward with the planned Phase I trial.
  • We have designed an observational study, PRE-CELL, to track disease progression and generate useful data in preparation for this future planned Phase I clinical trial. PRE-CELL has been approved by the institution’s ethics board and is currently enrolling subjects. PRE-CELL was designed to operate concurrently with the ongoing pre-clinical safety testing. For additional information go to: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01937923

Functional Neural Relay Formation by Human Neural Stem Cell Grafting in Spinal Cord Injury

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05628
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$4 699 569
Disease Focus: 
Spinal Cord Injury
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
We aim to develop a novel stem cell treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI) that is substantially more potent than previous stem cell treatments. By combining grafts of neural stem cells with scaffolds placed in injury sites, we have been able to optimize graft survival and filling of the injury site. Grafted cells extend long distance connections with the injured spinal cord above and below the lesion, while the host spinal cord also sends inputs to the neural stem cell implants. As a result, new functional relays are formed across the lesion site. These result in substantially greater functional improvement than previously reported in animal studies of stem cell treatment. Work proposed in this grant will identify the optimal human neural stem cells for preclinical development. Furthermore, in an unprecedented step in spinal cord injury research, we will test this treatment in appropriate preclinical models of SCI to provide the greatest degree of validation for human translation. Successful findings could lead to clinical trials of the most potent neural stem cell approach to date.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects approximately 1.2 million people in the United States, and there are more than 11,000 new injuries per year. A large number of spinal cord injured individuals live in California, generating annual State costs in the billions of dollars. This research will examine a novel stem cell treatment for SCI that could result in functional improvement, greater independence and improved life styles for injured individuals. Results of animal testing of this approach to date demonstrate far greater functional benefits than previous stem cell therapies. We will generate neural stem cells from GMP-compatible human embryonic stem cells, then test them in the most clinically relevant animal models of SCI. These studies will be performed as a multi-center collaborative effort with several academic institutions throughout California. In addition, we will leverage expertise and resources currently in use for another CIRM-funded project for ALS, thereby conserving State resources. If successful, these studies will form the basis for clinical trials in a disease of great unmet medical need, spinal cord injury. Moreover, the development of this therapy would reduce costs for clinical care while bringing novel biomedical resources to the State.
Progress Report: 
  • In the first 12 months of this project we have made important progress in the following areas:
  • 1) Identified the lead embryonic stem cell type for potential use in a translational clinical program.
  • 2) Replicated the finding that implants of ES-derived neural progenitor cells from this lead cell type extend axons out from the spinal cord lesion site in very high numbers and over very long distances.
  • 3) Begun efforts to scale this work to larger animal models of spinal cord injury.

Elucidating pathways from hereditary Alzheimer mutations to pathological tau phenotypes

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-07011
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 161 000
Disease Focus: 
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
We propose to elucidate pathways of genes that lead from early causes to later defects in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), which is common, fatal, and for which no effective disease-modifying drugs are available. Because no effective AD treatment is available or imminent, we propose to discover novel genetic pathways by screening purified human brain cells made from human reprogrammed stem cells (human IPS cells or hIPSC) from patients that have rare and aggressive hereditary forms of AD. We have already discovered that such human brain cells exhibit an unique biochemical behavior that indicates early development of AD in a dish. Thus, we hope to find new drug targets by using the new tools of human stem cells that were previously unavailable. We think that human brain cells in a dish will succeed where animal models and other types of cells have thus far failed.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that afflicts millions of Californians. The emotional and financial impact on families and on the state healthcare budget is enormous. This project seeks to find new drug targets to treat this terrible disease. If we are successful our work in the long-term may help diminish the social and familial cost of AD, and lead to establishment of new businesses in California using our approaches.

Misregulated Mitophagy in Parkinsonian Neurodegeneration

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-06935
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 174 943
Disease Focus: 
Parkinson's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Parkinson’s disease (PD), is one of the leading causes of disabilities and death and afflicting millions of people worldwide. Effective treatments are desperately needed but the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of Parkinson’s destructive path are poorly understood. Mitochondria are cell’s power plants that provide almost all the energy a cell needs. When these cellular power plants are damaged by stressful factors present in aging neurons, they release toxins (reactive oxygen species) to the rest of the neuron that can cause neuronal cell death (neurodegeneration). Healthy cells have an elegant mitochondrial quality control system to clear dysfunctional mitochondria and prevent their resultant devastation. Based on my work that Parkinson’s associated proteins PINK1 and Parkin control mitochondrial transport that might be essential for damaged mitochondrial clearance, I hypothesize that in Parkinson’s mutant neurons mitochondrial quality control is impaired thereby leading to neurodegeneration. I will test this hypothesis in iPSC (inducible pluripotent stem cells) from Parkinson’s patients. This work will be a major step forward in understanding the cellular dysfunctions underlying Parkinson’s etiology, and promise hopes to battle against this overwhelming health danger to our aging population.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Parkinson's disease (PD), one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, afflicts millions of people worldwide with tremendous global economic and societal burdens. About 500,000 people are currently living with PD in the U.S, and approximate 1/10 of them live in California. The number continues to soar as our population continues to age. An effective treatment is desperately needed but the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of PD’s destructive path remain poorly understood. This proposal aims to explore an innovative and critical cellular mechanism that controls mitochondrial transport and clearance via mitophagy in PD pathogenesis with elegant employment of bold and creative approaches to live image mitochondria in iPSC (inducible pluripotent stem cells)-derived dopaminergic neurons from Parkinson’s patients. This study is closely relevant to public health of the state of California and will greatly benefit its citizens, as it will illuminate the pathological causes of PD and provide novel targets for therapuetic intervention.

Molecular Imaging for Stem Cell Science and Clinical Application

Funding Type: 
Research Leadership 12
Grant Number: 
LA1_C12-06919
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$6 443 455
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Spinal Cord Injury
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Stem cells offer tremendous potential to treat previously intractable diseases. The clinical translation of these therapies, however, presents unique challenges. One challenge is the absence of robust methods to monitor cell location and fate after delivery to the body. The delivery and biological distribution of stem cells over time can be much less predictable compared to conventional therapeutics, such as small-molecule therapeutic drugs. This basic fact can cause road blocks in the clinical translation, or in the regulatory path, which may cause delays in getting promising treatments into patients. My research aims to meet these challenges by developing new non-invasive cell tracking platforms for emerging stem cell therapies. Recent progress in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated the feasibility of non-invasive monitoring of transplanted cells in patients. This project will build on these developments by creating next-generation cell tracking technologies with improved detectability and functionality. Additionally, I will provide leadership in the integration of non-invasive cell tracking into stem cell clinical trials. Specifically, this project will follow three parallel tracks. (1) The first track leverages molecular genetics to develop new nucleic acid-based MRI reporters. These reporters provide instructions to program a cell’s innate machinery so that they produce special proteins with magnetic properties that impart MRI contrast to cells, and allow the cells to be seen. My team will create neural stem cell lines with MRI reporters integrated into their genome so that those neural stem cell lines, and their daughter cells, can be tracked days and months after transfer into a patient. (2) The second track will develop methods to detect stem cell viability in vivo using perfluorocarbon-based biosensors that can measure a stem cell's intracellular oxygen level. This technology can potentially be used to measure stem cell engraftment success, to see if the new cells are joining up with the other cells where they are placed. (3) The third project involves investigating the role that the host’s inflammatory response plays in stem cell engraftment. These studies will employ novel perfluorocarbon imaging probes that enable MRI visualization and quantification of places in the body where inflammation is occurring. Overall, MRI cell tracking methods will be applied to new stem cell therapies for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, and other disease states, in collaboration with CIRM-funded investigators.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
California leads the nation in supporting stem cell research with the aim of finding cures for major diseases afflicting large segments of the state’s population. Significant resources are invested in the design of novel cellular therapeutic strategies and associated clinical trials. To accelerate the clinical translation of these potentially live saving therapies, many physicians need method to image the behavior and movement of cells non-invasively following transplant into patients. My research aims to meet these challenges by developing new cell tracking imaging platforms for emerging stem cell therapies. Recent progress in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated the feasibility of non-invasive monitoring of transplanted cells in patients. This project will build on these developments by leading the integration of MRI cell tracking into stem cell clinical trials and by developing next-generation technologies with improved sensitivity and functionality. Initially, MRI cell tracking methods will be applied to new stem cell therapies for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injury. In vivo MRI cell tracking can accelerate the process of deciding whether to continue at the preclinical and early clinical trial stages, and can facilitate smaller, less costly trials by enrolling smaller patient numbers. Imaging can potentially yield data about stem cell engraftment success. Moreover, MRI cell tracking can help improve safety profiling and can potentially lower regulatory barriers by verifying survival and location of transplanted cells. Overall, in vivo MRI cell tracking can help maximize the impact of the State’s investment in stem cell therapies by speeding-up clinical translation into patients. These endeavors are intrinsically collaborative and multidisciplinary. My project will create a new Stem Cell Imaging Center (SCIC) in California with a comprehensive set of ways to elucidate anatomical, functional, and molecular behavior of stem cells in model systems. The SCIC will provide scientific leadership to stem cell researchers and clinicians in the region, including a large number of CIRM-funded investigators who wish to bring state-of-the-art imaging into their clinical development programs. Importantly, the SCIC will focus intellectual talent on biological imaging for the state and the country. This project will help make MRI cell tracking more widespread clinically and position California to take a leadership role in driving this technology. An extensive infrastructure of MRI scanners already exist in California, and these advanced MRI methods would use this medical infrastructure better to advance stem cell therapies. Moreover, this project will lead to innovative new MRI tools and pharmaceutical imaging agents, thus providing economic benefits to California via the formation of new commercial products, industrial enterprises, and jobs.

Stem Cell-Derived Astrocyte Precursor Transplants in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Funding Type: 
Early Translational from Disease Team Conversion
Grant Number: 
TRX-01471
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$4 139 754
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Progress Report: 
  • Project Description and Rationale:
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult motor neuron disease, affecting 30,000 people in the US and the typical age of onset is in the mid-50s or slightly younger. ALS is a degenerative neural disease in which the damage and death of neurons results in progressive loss of the body’s functions until death, which is usually in 3-5 years of diagnosis. Current ALS treatments are primarily supportive, and providing excellent clinical care is essential for patients with ALS; however, there is an urgent need for treatments that significantly change the disease course. The only Food and Drug Administration approved, disease-specific medication for treatment of ALS is Rilutek (riluzole); which demonstrated only a modest effect on survival (up to 3 months) in clinical trials.
  • The ALS Disease Team/Early Translational project is focused on developing an ALS therapy based on human embryonic stem cell (ESC) derived neural stem cells (NSC) and/or astrocyte precursor cells transplanted into the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Several lines of evidence strongly support the approach of transplanting cells that exhibit the capacity to migrate, proliferate and mature into normal healthy astrocytes which can provide a neuroprotective effect for motor neurons and reduce or prevent neural damage and disease progression in ALS. Strong evidence has been generated from extensive studies in culture dishes and in animal models to support the concept that providing normal astrocytes in the proximity of α-motor neurons can protect them from neural damage.
  • Project Plan and Progress:
  • Multiple ESC lines were acquired in 2 rounds based on early and later availability. The first round of ESCs included ESCs from City of Hope (GMP H9) and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF4). The second round included ESCs from the University of California, San Francisco [UCSFB6 (aka UCSF4.2) and UCSFB7 (aka UCSF4.3)] and from BioTime (ESI-017). These ESC lines were tested for their ability to survive and expand under conditions required for producing a cellular therapy (FDA GMP-like and GTP compliant conditions). From these ESC lines, NSCs were generated, expanded and characterized to determine their ability to produce stable and consistent populations of NSCs under conditions required for producing a cellular therapy.
  • For the first round of cell lines, both UCSF4 and H9 were successfully induced to produce NSCs, which were mechanically enriched, expanded and implanted into immunodeficient rats and a rat model of ALS (SOD1G93A). For this small-scale in vivo screen, implanted UCSF4 and H9 NSCs survived, migrated and differentiated into neurons and astrocytic cells in 3-5 weeks, without producing tumors or other unwanted structures. NSCs from both UCSF4 and H9 performed similarly in culture and in vivo, thus the decision to use UCSF4 in the larger-scale in vivo studies for safety (implant into immunodeficient rats) and efficacy/proof of concept (SOD1G93A ALS model rats) was weighted by the difficulties obtaining H9 for future studies for a therapeutic product. These larger-scale studies began August 2013 (earlier than projected), with expected completion in February 2014.
  • For the second round of ESC lines (UCSFB6, UCSFB7 and BioTime ESI-017), UCSFB6 and UCSFB7 ESCs expanded well, while ESI-017 expansion was less robust. Because UCSFB6 and UCSFB7 ESCs are from the same blastomere, we decided to continue to NSC production with only UCSFB7, keeping UCSFB6 in reserve as a back-up. UCSFB7 ESCs were successfully induced to produce NSCs, which were mechanically enriched, expanded and implanted into immunodeficient rats and a rat model of ALS (SOD1G93A). The results from these studies are pending (some animals are still in-life), but early histology suggests the cell survival is similar to UCSF4 and H9. A second round of large-scale in vivo studies is planned to start January 2014 to evaluate this NSC line. By September 2014, the “best” NSC line will be selected as a therapeutic candidate for definitive pre-clinical studies and entry into clinical trials.
  • ESC production under GMP-like condition has been completed at the UC Davis GMP facility. UC Davis generated the first batch of NSCs, which were not sufficiently homogeneous for successful expansion beyond approximately passage 10. This prompted UCSD to investigate multiple enrichment strategies, which were tested on multiple cell lines to ensure method reproducibility. A mechanical enrichment method reproducibly resulted in more homogeneous NSC cultures, capable of expansion for 20 – 30 passages, or more. The NSC generation and enrichment methods are currently being transferred to UC Davis and the UCSD scientist who developed the methods will work side-by-side with the UC Davis GMP production team to ensure successful method transfer to the GMP facility.
  • UCSF4 NSCs are also in use in a CIRM supported early translation study for spinal cord injury.

Development of Novel Autophagy Inducers to Block the Progression of and Treat Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases

Funding Type: 
Early Translational IV
Grant Number: 
TR4-06693
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 278 080
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that primarily affects motor neurons (MNs). It results in paralysis and loss of control of vital functions, such as breathing, leading to premature death. Life expectancy of ALS patients averages 2–5 years from diagnosis. About 5,600 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with ALS each year, and about 30,000 Americans have the disease. There is a clear unmet need for novel ALS therapeutics because no drug blocks the progression of ALS. This may be due to the fact that multiple proteins work together to cause the disease and therapies targeting individual toxic proteins will not prevent neurodegeneration due to other factors involved in the ALS disease process. We propose to develop a novel ALS therapy involving small molecule drugs that stimulate a natural defense system in MNs, autophagy, which will remove all of the disease-causing proteins in MNs to reduce neurodegeneration. We previously reported on a class of neuronal autophagy inducers (NAIs) and in this grant will prioritize those drugs for blocking neurodegeneration of human iPSC derived MNs from patients with familial and sporadic ALS to identify leads that will then be tested for efficacy in vivo in animal models of ALS to select a clinical candidate. Since all of our NAIs are FDA approved for treating indications other than ALS, our clinical candidate could be rapidly transitioned to testing for efficacy and safety in treating ALS patients near the end of this grant.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS as well as Alzheimer’s (AD), Parkinson’s (PD) and Huntington’s Disease (HD) are devastating to the patient and family and create a major financial burden to California (CA). These diseases are due to the buildup of toxic misfolded proteins in key neuronal populations that leads to neurodegeneration. This suggests that common mechanisms may be operating in these diseases. The drugs we are developing to treat ALS target this common mechanism, which we believe is an impairment of autophagy that prevents clearance of disease-causing proteins. Effective autophagy inducers we identify to treat ALS may turn out to be effective in treating other neurodegenerative diseases. This could have a major impact on the health care in CA. Most important in our studies is the translational impact of the use of patient iPSC-derived neurons and astrocytes to identify a new class of therapeutics to block neurodegeneration that can be quickly transitioned to testing in clinical trials for treating ALS and other CNS diseases. Future benefits to CA citizens include: 1) development of new treatments for ALS with application to other diseases such as AD, HD and PD that affect thousands of individuals in CA; 2) transfer of new technologies to the public realm with resulting IP revenues coming into the state with possible creation of new biotechnology spin-off companies and resulting job creation; and 3) reductions in extensive care-giving and medical costs.

A drug-screening platform for autism spectrum disorders using human astrocytes

Funding Type: 
Early Translational IV
Grant Number: 
TR4-06747
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 824 719
Disease Focus: 
Autism
Neurological Disorders
Rett's Syndrome
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex neurodevelopmental diseases that affect about 1% of children in the United States. Such diseases are mainly characterized by deficits in verbal communication, impaired social interaction, and limited and repetitive interests and behavior. The causes and best treatments remain uncertain. One of the major impediments to ASD research is the lack of relevant human disease models. Reprogramming of somatic cells to a pluripotent state (induced pluripotent stem cells, iPSCs) has been accomplished using human cells. Isogenic pluripotent cells are attractive from the prospective to understanding complex diseases, such as ASD. The main goal of this project is to accelerate drug discovery to treat ASD using astrocytes generated from human iPSC. The model recapitulates early stages of ASD and represents a promising cellular tool for drug screening, diagnosis and personalized treatment. By testing whether drugs have differential effects in iPSC-derived astrocytes, we can begin to unravel how genetic variation in ASD dictates responses to different drugs. Insights that emerge from our studies may drive the development of new therapeutic interventions for ASD. They may also illuminate possible differences in drug responsiveness in different patients and potentially define a molecular signature resulting from ASD variants, which could predict the onset of disease before symptoms are seen.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Autism spectrum disorders, including Rett syndrome, Angelman syndrome, Timothy syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Tuberous sclerosis, Asperger syndrome or childhood disintegrative disorder, affect many Californian children. In the absence of a functionally effective cure or early diagnostic tool, the cost of caring for patients with such pediatric diseases is high, in addition to a major personal and family impact since childhood. The strikingly high prevalence of ASD, dramatically increasing over the past years, has led to the emotional view that ASD can be traced to a single source, such as vaccine, preservatives or other environmental factors. Such perspective has a negative impact on science and society in general. Our major goal is to develop a drug-screening platform to rescue deficiencies showed from brain cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with ASD. If successful, our model will bring novel insights on the dentification of potential diagnostics for early detection of ASD risk, or ability to predict severity of particular symptoms. In addition, the development of this type of pharmacological therapeutic approach in California will serve as an important proof of principle and stimulate the formation of businesses that seek to develop these types of therapies (providing banks of inducible pluripotent stem cells) in California with consequent economic benefit.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Neurological Disorders

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine