Neurological Disorders

Coding Dimension ID: 
303
Coding Dimension path name: 
Neurological Disorders

Directed Evolution of Novel AAV Variants for Enhanced Gene Targeting in Pluripotent Human Stem Cells and Investigation of Dopaminergic Neuron Differentiation

Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies I
Grant Number: 
RT1-01021
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$918 000
Disease Focus: 
Parkinson's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have considerable potential as sources of differentiated cells for numerous biomedical applications. The ability to introduce targeted changes into the DNA of these cells – a process known as gene targeting – would have very broad implications. For example, mutations could readily be introduced into genes to study their roles in stem cell propagation and differentiation, to analyze mechanisms of human disease, and to develop disease models to aid in creating new therapies. Unfortunately, gene targeting efficiency in hESCs is very low. To meet this urgent need, we propose to develop new molecular tools and novel technologies for high efficiency gene targeting in hES and iPS cells. Importantly, this approach will be coupled with genome-wide identification and functional analysis of genes involved in the process in dopaminergic neuron development, work with fundamental implications for Parkinson's disease. Barriers to targeted genetic modification include the effective delivery of gene targeting constructs into cells and the introduction of defined changes into the genome. We have developed a high throughput approach to engineer novel properties into a highly promising, safe, and clinically relevant gene delivery vehicle. For example, we have engineered variants of this vehicle with highly efficient gene delivery to neural stem cells (NSCs), and the resulting vehicles can mediate efficient gene targeting. We now propose to engineer novel gene delivery and targeting vehicles optimized for use in hESCs and iPS cells. One application of such an improved vector system will be to study the mechanism of ESC differentiation into dopaminergic neurons aided by the key transcription factor Lmx1a. We propose to identify target genes that are regulated by Lmx1a during dopaminergic neuron differentiation using the newly developed technique of ChIP-seq, in combination with RNA expression and bioinformatics analysis. This work will identify essential control genes that drive dopaminergic neuron differentiation. Furthermore, our improved gene delivery and targeting system will be used for overexpressing candidate genes, knocking them down via RNA interference, and knocking in reporter genes to analyze gene expression networks during neuronal differentiation. The generation of efficient targeting technologies, in combination with genome wide analysis of gene regulation networks, will provide a general method for identifying and testing key regulatory genes for stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, as well as generating stem cell-based models of human disease. This blend of bioengineering and cell biology therefore has strong potential to create an important new capability for basic and applied stem cell research.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This proposal will develop novel molecular tools and methodologies that will strongly enhance the scientific, technological, and economic development of stem cell therapeutics in California. The most important net benefit will be for the treatment of human diseases. Efficiently introducing specific genetic modifications into a stem cell genome is a greatly enabling technology that would impact many downstream medical applications. This capability will further enable investigations of self-renewal and differentiation, two defining properties of human stem cells. New tools to introduce targeted alterations of ES and iPS cells will also yield key model systems to elucidate mechanisms of human disease, and most importantly enable the generation of mutant cell lines to serve as models of human disease and systems for high throughput screening to develop novel therapies. Finally, the reverse process, the repair of genetic lesions responsible for disease, can in the long run enable the generation of patent-specific stem cell lines for therapeutic application. Each of these applications will directly benefit biomedical knowledge and human health. Furthermore, this proposal directly addresses several research targets of this RFA – the development and utilization of efficient homologous recombination techniques for gene targeting in human stem cells, the development of safer and more effective viral vectors for gene transduction in human stem cells, and the development and analysis of human embryonic stem cell lines with reporter genes inserted into key loci – indicating that CIRM believes that the proposed capabilities are a priority for California’s stem cell effort. While the potential applications of the proposed technology are broad, we will apply it to a specific and urgent biomedical problem: elucidating mechanisms of ES cell differentiation into dopaminergic neurons, part of a critical path towards developing therapies for Parkinson’s disease. While hESCs clearly have this capacity, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood, and the efficiency of this process must be improved. We will elucidate transcriptional networks that underlie this process, and utilize our novel gene targeting system to identify and analyze key components of these networks. This work will lead to a better fundamental understanding of mechanisms regulating stem cell differentiation, as well as enhance our ability to control this complex process for biomedical application. The co-investigators have a strong record of translating basic science and engineering into practice through interactions with industry, including the founding of biotech companies in California. Finally, this collaborative project will focus diverse research groups with many students on an important interdisciplinary project at the interface of science and engineering, thereby training future employees and contributing to the technological and economic development of California.
Progress Report: 
  • The central goal of this is to develop enhanced vehicles for gene delivery to human embryonic stem cells, both to modulate gene expression and to edit the cellular genome via homologous recombination. We have been using a novel directed evolution technology to improve the properties of a promising viral vehicle, and we are in the progress of progressively increasing gene delivery efficiency. In particular, we have isolated several viral vector variants with enhanced gene delivery to human embryonic stem cells.
  • In parallel, we have a strong interest in understanding and elucidating mechanisms of human pluripotent stem cell differentiation into dopaminergic neurons, with implications for Parkinson's Disease. In particular, the transcription factor Lmx1a plays a role in this fate specification, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We are conducting chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with next generation DNA sequencing to identify the genes in the cellular genome that this factor regulates. We have generated an antibody to isolate this protein from cells and are in the process of pulling down DNA bound to this factor within cells undergoing dopaminergic specification. Once we have identified relevant target genes, we will use the new gene delivery technology to study their functional role in dopaminergic specification of human embryonic stem cells.
  • The central goal of this is to develop enhanced vehicles for gene delivery to human embryonic stem cells, both to modulate gene expression and to edit the cellular genome via homologous recombination. We have been using a novel directed evolution technology to improve the properties of a promising viral vehicle, and we are in the progress of progressively increasing gene delivery efficiency. In particular, we have isolated several viral vector variants with enhanced gene delivery to human embryonic stem cells.
  • In parallel, we have a strong interest in understanding and elucidating mechanisms of human pluripotent stem cell differentiation into dopaminergic neurons, with implications for Parkinson's Disease. In particular, the transcription factor Lmx1a plays a role in this fate specification, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We are conducting chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with next generation DNA sequencing to identify the genes in the cellular genome that this factor regulates. We have generated an antibody to isolate this protein from cells and are in the process of pulling down DNA bound to this factor within cells undergoing dopaminergic specification. Once we have identified relevant target genes, we will use the new gene delivery technology to study their functional role in dopaminergic specification of human embryonic stem cells.
  • The central goal of this project is to develop enhanced vehicles for gene delivery to human embryonic stem cells, both to modulate gene expression and to edit the cellular genome via homologous recombination. Harnessing a novel directed evolution technology we have developed to improve the properties of a promising viral vehicle, we have significantly increased its gene delivery efficiency to human embryonic and human induced pluripotent stem cells. Furthermore, this advance resulted in considerable improvements in the efficiency of gene targeting (i.e. editing) in the genomes of these cells.
  • In parallel, we have a strong interest in understanding and elucidating mechanisms of luripotent stem cell differentiation into neurons, with for example implications for Parkinson's Disease. In particular, the transcription factor Lmx1a plays a role in this fate specification, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We attempted chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with next generation DNA sequencing to identify the genes in the cellular genome that this factor regulates. Progress in this objective was ultimately hampered by the lack of a suitable antibody against Lmx1a. However, in parallel we have used an analogous approach to investigate mechanisms by which RNA transcription is regulated during the differentiation of embryonic stem cells into neurons, including motor neurons. These basic results can now be applied to enhance the efficiency of neuronal differentiation.

CIRM Shared Research Laboratory for Stem Cells and Aging

Funding Type: 
Shared Labs
Grant Number: 
CL1-00501
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$5 893 682
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Age-related diseases of the nervous system are major challenges for biomedicine in the 21st century. These disorders, which include Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke, cause loss of neural tissue and functional impairment. Currently, there is no cure for these devastating neurological disorders. A promising approach to the treatment of age-related neurological disorders is cell therapy, i.e., transplantation of nerve cells into the brain or spinal cord to replace lost cells and restore function. Work in this field has been limited however, due to the limited availability of cells for transplantation. For example, cells from 6-10 human fetuses obtained 6-10 weeks post-conception are required for one patient with Parkinson’s disease to undergo transplantation. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) offer a potentially unlimited source of any cell type that may be required for cell replacement therapy, due to their remarkable ability to self-renew (they can divide indefinitely in culture) and to develop into any cell type in the body. In this proposal, we will build out approximately 3400 square feet of shared laboratory space within our existing research facility for hESC research, as well as approximately 2400 square feet for classroom facilities dedicated to training in hESC culture and manipulation. We seek to understand how hESCs differentiate into authentic, clinically useful nerve cells and will use novel molecular tools to examine the behavior of cells transplanted in animal models of human neurological disease. We will also need to develop a noninvasive method of following cells after transplantation and we propose to develop luciferase-tagged (light-emitting) hESC lines for in vivo animal imaging. In addition, we will use hESC-derived nerve cells to screen drug and chemical libraries for compounds that protect nerve cells from toxicity, and to develop in vitro disease models. We believe that these experiments are critical to enhancing our understanding of neurological diseases and providing the tools that will be necessary to move cell therapy to the clinic. Before a hESC-based therapy can be developed, it is essential to train scientists to efficiently grow, maintain and manipulate these cells. We propose to teach four 5-day hands-on training courses – two basic and two advanced hESC culture courses per year – to California scientists free of charge. These courses will provide scientists with an understanding of hESC biology and will enable them to set up and conduct hESC research after completion of training. In summary, the goal of this proposal is to provide over twenty investigators at the home institute and neighboring institutions with the ability to culture, differentiate, and genetically manipulate hESCs – including clinical-grade hESC lines – to develop diagnostic and therapeutic tools.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
We propose to build a Shared Research Laboratory and offer a Stem Cell Techniques Course for over twenty principal investigators at the home institute and neighboring institutes working collaboratively on stem-cell biology and neurological diseases of aging. We propose to: 1) Purify nerve cells at different stages of maturation from human embryonic stem cells and to develop transplantation strategies in animal models that mimic human diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, stroke and spinal cord injuries; 2) Screen drug and chemical libraries for reagents that protect nerve cells from toxicity and develop in vitro disease models using nerve cells generated from human embryonic stem cells; and 3) Assess the long-term integration and differentiation of transplanted cells using a non-invasive imaging system. We believe these experiments provide not only a blueprint for moving stem-cell transplantation for Parkinson’s disease toward the clinic, but also a generalized plan for how stem-cell therapy can be developed to treat disorders like motor neuron disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease) and spinal cord injury. As the only stem-cell research facility in California’s 10-12 most northwest counties, we are uniquely positioned to extend the promised benefits of Proposition 71 to this large part of the state. The tools and reagents we develop will be made widely available to California researchers and we will select California-based companies for commercialization of any therapies that may result. We also hope that California-based physicians will be at the forefront of translating this promising avenue of research into clinical applications. Finally, we expect that the money expended on this research will benefit the California research and business communities, and that the tools and reagents we develop will help accelerate stem-cell research in California and worldwide.

Defining the Isoform-Specific Effects of Apolipoprotein E on the Development of iPS Cells into Functional Neurons in Vitro and in Vivo

Funding Type: 
New Faculty II
Grant Number: 
RN2-00952
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 847 600
Disease Focus: 
Stroke
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
GOALS We propose to determine the effects of different forms of apoE on the development of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into functional neurons. In Aim 1, iPS cells will be generated from skin cells of adult knock-in (KI) mice expressing different forms of human apoE and in humans with different apoE genotypes. In Aim 2, the development of the iPS cells into functional neurons in culture and in mouse brains will be compared. In Aim 3, the effects of different forms of apoE on the functional recovery of mice with acute brain injury treated with iPS cell–derived neural stem cells (NSCs) will be assessed. RATIONALE AND SIGNIFICANCE The central nervous system (CNS) has limited ability to regenerate and recover after injury. For this reason, recovery from acute and chronic neurological diseases, such as stroke and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), is often incomplete and disability results. Embryonic stem cells have great promise for treating or curing neurological diseases, but their therapeutic use is limited by ethical concerns and by rejection reactions after allogenic transplantation. The generation of iPS cells from somatic cells offers a way to potentially circumvent the ethical issues and to generate patient- and disease-specific stem cells for future therapy. In the CNS, apoE plays important roles in lipid homeostasis and in neuronal maintenance. However, apoE2, apoE3, and apoE4 differ in their ability to accomplish these tasks. ApoE4, the major genetic risk factor for AD, is associated with poor clinical outcome and more rapid progression or greater severity of head trauma, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis—all potential targets of stem cell therapy. This proposal builds on three novel findings in human apoE-KI mice. (1) NSCs express apoE. (2) ApoE plays a role in cell-fate determination (neuron vs astrocyte) of NSCs. (3) ApoE4 impairs the neuronal development of NSCs. Thus, we hypothesize that transplantation of iPS cells derived from apoE4 carriers (~20% of the general population and ~50% of AD patients) might not be beneficial or even detrimental for patients with neurological diseases. We propose in vitro and in vivo studies to assess the effects of different forms of apoE on the development of iPS cells into functional neurons and on the functional recovery of mice with acute brain injury treated with iPS cell-derived NSCs. These studies will shed light on the regulation of neuronal development of iPS cells and help to “optimize” future iPS cell therapy for neurological diseases. SPECIFIC AIMS Aim 1. To establish adult mouse and human iPS cell lines with different apoE genotypes. Aim 2. To determine the isoform-specific effects of apoE on the development of iPS cells into functional neurons in culture and in mouse brains. Aim 3. To assess the isoform-specific effects of apoE on the functional recovery of mice with acute (stroke) brain injury treated with iPS cell-derived NSCs.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
CONTRIBUTION TO THE CALFORNIA ECONOMY: A major goal of regenerative medicine is to repair damaged cells or tissue. My research focuses on (1) understanding the role of neuronal regeneration in central nervous system function and (2) developing stem cell therapy for acute and chronic neurological diseases, including stroke and Alzheimer's disease. Stroke and Alzheimer's disease are the leading causes of disability and dementia and are the fastest growing form of neurological diseases in California, in the USA, and worldwide. My research could benefit the California economy by creating jobs in the biomedical sector. Ultimately, this study could help reduce the adverse impact of neurological diseases. Thereby, I hope to increase the productivity and enhance the quality of life for Californians. The results of my studies will also help develop new technology that could contribute to the California biotechnology industry. The studies will characterize multiple lines of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells carrying apoE3, a protein protective to the brain, or apoE4, which is detrimental to the brain and is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. These cell lines could be valuable for biotechnology companies and researchers who are screening for drug compounds targeting different neurological diseases. CONTRIBUTION TO THE HEALTH OF CALFORNIANS: The most important contribution of the studies will be to improve the health of Californians. Diseases that are the target of regenerative medicine, such as stroke and Alzheimer’s disease, are major causes of mortality and morbidity, resulting in billions of dollars in healthcare costs and lost productivity. As we continue our efforts in medical research, we hope to one day unlock the secrets of brain development and repair. This knowledge will help medical researchers develop beneficial therapies beyond what is currently available and potentially improve the quality of life and life expectancy of patients with neurological diseases, such as stroke and Alzheimer’s disease.
Progress Report: 
  • The goal of this proposal is to determine the isoform-specific effects of apolipoprotein (apo) E on the development of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into functional neurons both in vitro and in mice. Toward this goal, we have made significant progress in Aims 1 and 2.
  • First, we further demonstrated that neural stem cells (NSCs) express apoE. ApoE-KO mice had significantly less hippocampal neurogenesis, but significantly more astrogenesis, than wildtype mice due to decreased Noggin expression in NSCs. In contrast, neuronal maturation in apoE4 knock-in (apoE4-KI) mice was impaired due to reduced survival and function of GABAergic interneurons in the hilus of the hippocampus, and a GABAA receptor potentiator rescued the apoE4-associated decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis. Thus, apoE plays an important role in hippocampal neurogenesis, and the apoE4 isoform impairs GABAergic input to newborn neurons, leading to decreased neurogenesis. A paper describing these data was published in Cell Stem Cell (Li G. et al. 2009, 5:634-645), which evidently is the 400th publication of CIRM-funded projects.
  • Second, we established mouse iPS cell lines from adult mouse fibroblasts of wildtype, apoE knockout (apoE-KO), human apoE2-KI, human apoE3-KI, and human apoE4-KI mice.
  • Finally, we developed NSC lines from mouse iPS cells with different apoE genotypes (wildtype mouse apoE, apoE-KO, apoE2, apoE3, and apoE4). These cell lines will be used to study the effects of apoE isoforms on neuronal development in vitro in culture and in vivo in mouse models.
  • The goal of this proposal is to determine the isoform-specific effects of apolipoprotein (apo) E on the development of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into functional neurons both in vitro and in mice. Toward this goal, we have made significant progress in the past year, as summarized below.
  • First, We developed human iPS cells from skin fibroblasts of individuals with different apoE genotypes. We are fully characterizing these human iPS cell lines.
  • Second, We are establishing neural stem cell (NSC) lines from human iPS cells with different apoE genotypes. Some of the NSCs have been maintained in monolayer cultures for many generations. These NSCs will be used to study the effects of apoE isoforms on neuronal development in vitro in cultures and in vivo in mice.
  • Finally, we demonstrated that mouse apoE4-NSCs generated significantly fewer total neurons and fewer GABAergic interneurons than mouse apoE3-NSCs in culture. Thus, the detrimental effects of apoE4 on neurogenesis and GABAergic interneuron survival, as we observed in vivo in apoE4 knock-in mice (Li G. et al. Cell Stem Cell, 2009, 5:634-645), are recapitulated in cultures of mouse iPS cell–derived NSCs in vitro.
  • The goal of this proposal is to determine the isoform-specific effects of apolipoprotein (apo) E on the development of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into functional neurons both in vitro and in mice. Toward this goal, we have made significant progress in all three aims in the past year, as summarized below.
  • 1) We have fully characterized two apoE3/3-hiPS cell lines and two apoE4/4-iPS cell lines.
  • 2) We have established NSC lines from human iPS cells with an apoE3/3 or apoE4/4 genotype. The hNSCs have been maintained in suspension or monolayer culture for multiple passages.
  • 3) We demonstrated that apoE4-hNSCs generated ~50% fewer GABAergic interneurons than apoE3-hNSCs in culture. Thus, the detrimental effects of apoE4 on GABAergic interneuron survival, as we observed in vivo in apoE4 knock-in mice (Li G. et al. Cell Stem Cell, 2009, 5:634-645), are recapitulated in cultures of human iPS cell-derived NSCs in vitro.
  • 4) We established protocols in our lab to differentiate human iPS cell-derived NSCs into different types of neurons in cultures.
  • The goal of this proposal is to determine the isoform-specific effects of apolipoprotein (apo) E on the development of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into functional neurons both in vitro and in mice. Toward this goal, we have made significant progress in all three aims in the past year, as summarized below.
  • 1) We demonstrated that apoE4-miPSC-derived mNSCs had a greater “age-dependent (passage-dependent)” decrease in generation and/or survival of MAP2-positive neurons in cultures.
  • 2) We also demonstrated that apoE4-miPSC-derived mNSCs had an even greater “age-dependent (passage-dependent)” decrease in generation and/or survival of GAD67-positive GABAergic neurons, as seen in vivo in apoE4 knock-in mice (Li et al., Cell Stem Cell, 2009, 5:634–645).
  • 3) We expanded the pilot study reported last year and confirmed the detrimental effect of apoE4 on GABAergic interneuron development/survival of hiPS cell-derived hNSCs. ApoE4 also increased tau phosphorylation, one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease, in neurons derived from apoE4-hiPS cells.
  • 4) We established a protocol to transplant apoE-miPS cell-derived mNSCs into mouse brains. The transplanted apoE-mNSCs developed into neurons and astrocytes and integrated into the neural circuitry.
  • The goal of this proposal is to determine the isoform-specific effects of apolipoprotein (apo) E on the development of pluripotent stem cells into functional neurons in vitro in culture and in vivo in mice for potential cell replacement therapy. Toward this goal, we have made significant progress in all three aims in the past year, as summarized below.
  • 1) We demonstrated that mouse GABAergic progenitors transplanted into the hilus of apoE3-KI and apoE4-KI mice developed into mature interneurons and functionally integrated into the hippocampal circuitry.
  • 2) We also demonstrated that transplantation of mouse GABAergic progenitors into the hilus of apoE4-KI mice rescued learning and memory deficits.
  • 3) Transplantation of mouse GABAergic progenitors into the hilus of hippocampus also rescued learning and memory deficits in apoE4-KI mice expressing Alzheimer’s disease-causing APP mutations.

Derivation of Parkinson's Disease Coded-Stem Cells (PD-SCs)

Funding Type: 
New Cell Lines
Grant Number: 
RL1-00682
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 589 760
Disease Focus: 
Parkinson's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Parkinson's disease (PD) is currently the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, severely debilitating approximately 1-2% of the US population. The disease is caused by a selective loss of dopamine-producing neurons located in a specific region of the brain. This loss leads to significant motor function impairment and age-dependent tremors. Unfortunately there is currently no cure for PD, however a synthetic dopamine treatment (L-DOPA), temporarily alleviates symptoms. The mechanisms of PD progression are currently unknown. However, genetic studies have identified that mutations (changes) in seven genes, including ?-synuclein, LRRK2, uchL1, parkin, PINK1, DJ-1 and ATP13A2 cause familial PD. Although the familial form of PD only affects a small portion of PD cases, uncovering the function of these genes may provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to the majority of PD cases. One of the best strategies to study PD mechanisms is to generate experimental models that mimic the initiation and progression of PD. A number of cellular and animal models have been developed for PD research. However, a model, which closely resembles the human degeneration process of PD, is currently not available because human neurons are unable to continuously propagate (grow) in culture. Human stem cells provide an opportunity to fulfill this task because these cells can grow and be programmed to generate dopamine nerve cells (the neurons under assault in PD patients). In this study, we propose to create stem cell lines that possess PD-associated mutations in two causative genes, PINK1 and parkin, using either rejected early stage embryos or cultured patient fibroblasts. These cell lines will in effect, represent a model of human PD degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Our working hypothesis is that PD-associated abnormal parkin or PINK1 genes cause degeneration of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons, and dopaminergic neurons in vivo via the same mechanism. We will fulfill three tasks in this study; 1/ To generate the PD-stem cell (PD-SCs) line which harbor abnormal or mutant parkin or PINK1 genes; 2/ To determine the whether the PD-SCs cell lines can form into midbrain dopaminergic nerve cells; 3/ To determine whether mutations in parkin and PINK1 effect the survival of dopaminergic neurons which are derived from the PD-SCs cells. Successful completion of this study will yield novel cellular models for studying the mechanisms involved in PD initiation and progression, and further screening remedies for PD treatment.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second leading neurodegenerative disease with no current cure available. Compared to other states, California is the highest in the incidence of this particular disease. First, California growers use approximately 250 million pounds of pesticides annually, about a quarter of all pesticides used in the US (Cal Pesticide use reporting system). A commonly used herbicide, paraquat, has been shown to induce parkinsonism in both animals and human. Other pesticides are also proposed as potential causative agents for PD. Studies have shown increased PD-caused mortality in agricultural pesticide-use counties in comparison to those non-use counties in California. Second, California has the largest Hispanic population. Studies suggest that incidence of PD is the highest among Hispanics (Van Den Eeden et al, American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol 157, pages 1015-1022, 2003). Thus, finding effective treatments of PD will significantly benefit citizens in California.
Progress Report: 
  • Parkinson’s disease (PD) is currently the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, severely debilitating approximately 1-2% of the US population. The disease is caused by a selective loss of dopamine-producing neurons located in a specific region of the brain. This loss leads to significant motor function impairment and age-dependent tremors. Unfortunately there is currently no cure for PD, however a synthetic dopamine treatment (L-DOPA), temporarily alleviates symptoms.
  • The mechanism of PD progression are currently unknown. However, genetic studies have identified that mutations (changes) in multiple genes, including α-synuclein, LRRK2, uchL1, parkin, PINK1, DJ-1 and ATP13A2 cause familial PD. Although the familial form of PD only affects a small portion of PD cases, uncovering the function of these genes may provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to the majority of PD cases.
  • One of the best strategies to study PD mechanisms is to generate experimental models that mimic the initiation and progression of PD. A number of cellular and animal models have been developed for PD research. However, a model, which closely resembles the human degeneration process of PD, is currently not available because human neurons are unable to continuously propagate (grow) in culture. Human stem cells provide an opportunity to fulfill this task because these cells can grow and be programmed to generate dopamine nerve cells (the neurons under assault in PD patients).
  • In this study, we propose to create stem cell lines that possess PD-associated mutations in two causative genes, PINK1 and parkin, using either rejected early stage embryos or cultured patient fibroblasts. These cell lines will in effect, represent a model of human PD degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Our working hypothesis is that PD-associated abnormal parkin or PINK1 genes cause degeneration of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons, and dopaminergic neurons in vivo via the same mechanism. We will fulfill three tasks in this study; 1/ To generate the PD-stem cell (PD-SCs) line which harbor abnormal or mutant parkin or PINK1 genes; 2/ To determine the whether the PD-SCs cell lines can form into midbrain dopaminergic nerve cells; 3/ To determine whether mutations in parkin and PINK1 effect the survival of dopaminergic neurons which are derived from the PD-SCs cells. Successful completion of this study will yield novel cellular models for studying the mechanisms involved in PD initiation and progression, and further screening remedies for PD treatment.
  • During last year, we have successfully generated primary skin fibroblast cultures from PD patients harboring mutations of parkin, PINK1, and DJ-1 genes, as well as sporadic PD patients and normal individuals. By using these cells, we have already generated four induced stem cell lines expressing multiple pluripotent markers (two from PD patients and two from normal individuals. These lines can also form teratomas with cells from three germ layers using mouse as host. These findings suggest that the induced pluripotent cell lines generated in the lab are likely PD patient specific stem cells.
  • During the next report year, we will continue to generate more PD patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells. We will carefully characterize all lines generated in the lab as proposed. Furthermore, we will adapt protocols to differentiate the new lines into dopaminergic neurons.
  • Public Summary of Scientific Progress
  • Parkinson’s disease (PD) is currently the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder affecting approximately 1-2% of the US population. The disease is caused by a selective loss of dopamine-producing neurons located in a specific region of the brain. This loss leads to significant motor function impairment and age-dependent tremors. Unfortunately, there is currently no cure for PD, however a synthetic dopamine treatment (L-DOPA), temporarily alleviates symptoms.
  • Genetic studies have identified that mutations (changes) in multiple genes cause familial PD. Although the familial form of PD only affects a small portion of PD cases, uncovering the function of these genes in PD-affected dopamine-secretion neurons may provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to the majority of PD cases.
  • One of the best strategies to study PD mechanisms is to generate experimental models that mimic the initiation and progression of PD. A number of cellular and animal models have been developed for PD research. However, a model, which closely resembles the human degeneration process of PD, is currently not available because human neurons are unable to continuously propagate (grow) in culture. Human stem cells provide an opportunity to fulfill this task because these cells can grow and be programmed to generate dopamine nerve cells (the neurons under assault in PD patients).
  • In this study, we propose to create stem cell lines that possess PD-associated mutations in two causative genes, PINK1 and parkin, using either rejected early stage embryos or cultured patient fibroblasts. These cell lines will in effect, represent a model of human PD degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Our working hypothesis is that PD-associated abnormal parkin or PINK1 genes cause degeneration of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons, and dopaminergic neurons in vivo via the same mechanism. We will fulfill three tasks in this study; 1/ To generate the PD-stem cell (PD-SCs) line which harbor abnormal or mutant parkin or PINK1 genes; 2/ To determine the whether the PD-SCs cell lines can form into midbrain dopaminergic nerve cells; 3/ To determine whether mutations in parkin and PINK1 effect the survival of dopaminergic neurons which are derived from the PD-SCs cells. Successful completion of this study will yield novel cellular models for studying the mechanisms involved in PD initiation and progression, and further screening remedies for PD treatment.
  • During last year, we have successfully obtained more primary skin fibroblast cultures from PD patients harboring mutations of parkin, PINK1, DJ-1 and PLA2G6 genes, as well as sporadic PD patients and normal control individuals. By using these cells, we have already generated 9 induced stem cell lines expressing multiple pluripotent markers (7 from PD patients and 2 from normal individuals). These lines can also form teratomas with cells from three germ layers using mouse as host. These findings suggest that the induced pluripotent cell lines generated in the lab are likely PD patient specific stem cells.
  • During the next report year, we will continue to generate more PD patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells. We will carefully characterize all lines generated in the lab as proposed. Furthermore, we will adapt protocols to differentiate the new lines into dopaminergic neurons.
  • Parkinson’s disease (PD) is currently the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, severely debilitating approximately 1-2% of the US population. The disease is caused by a selective loss of dopamine-producing neurons located in a specific region of the brain. This loss leads to significant motor function impairment and age-dependent tremors. Unfortunately there is currently no cure for PD, however a synthetic dopamine treatment (L-DOPA), temporarily alleviates symptoms.
  • The mechanism of PD progression is currently unknown. However, genetic studies have identified that mutations (changes) in multiple genes, including α-synuclein, LRRK2, uchL1, parkin, PINK1, DJ-1 and ATP13A2 cause familial PD. Although the familial form of PD only affects a small portion of PD cases, uncovering the function of these genes may provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to the majority of PD cases.
  • One of the best strategies to study PD mechanisms is to generate experimental models that mimic the initiation and progression of PD. A number of cellular and animal models have been developed for PD research. However, a model, which closely resembles the human degeneration process of PD, is currently not available because human neurons are unable to continuously propagate (grow) in culture. Human stem cells provide an opportunity to fulfill this task because these cells can grow and be programmed to generate dopamine nerve cells (the neurons under assault in PD patients).
  • In this study, we propose to create stem cell lines that either have the genetic background of sporadic PD patients or possess PD-associated mutations using cultured patient fibroblasts. These cell lines will in effect, represent a model of human PD degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Our working hypothesis is that the degeneration of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons and dopaminergic neurons in vivo via the same mechanism. We will fulfill three tasks in this study; 1/ To generate the PD-stem cell (PD-SCs) line which either have the genetic background of sporadic PD patients or harbor PD specific gene mutantions; 2/ To determine the whether the PD-SCs cell lines can form into midbrain dopaminergic nerve cells; 3/ To determine whether mutations in parkin and PINK1 effect the survival of dopaminergic neurons which are derived from the PD-SCs cells. Successful completion of this study will yield novel cellular models for studying the mechanisms involved in PD initiation and progression, and further screening remedies for PD treatment.
  • During last year, we have finished to develop 15 lines of iPSCs. These include 5 lines from normal control individuals, 5 lines from sporadic Parkinson disease patients, and 5 lines from Parkinson disease patients harboring disease related mutations of PINK1, DJ-1 and PLA2G6 genes. These lines provide an unique opportunity to systematically study comparative pathophysiology of Parkinson disease using sporadic and genetic cases. Moreover, we indeed spent more than a year in optimizing the condition for differentiation of these lines. It is recognized that iPSCs are more difficult to differentiate than the hESCs. We are now able to finalize the protocols to have all lines be differentiated in vitro. Therefore, we will be able to compare differences among the controls, sporadic PD and genetic PD at the level of cell biology and molecular biology.
  • During the next report year, we will differentiate all lines into DA neurons and carefully the functional changes of these cells. We hope that the results will reveal some molecular basis of PD pathogenesis from these human neurons.
  • Parkinson’s disease (PD) is currently the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, severely debilitating approximately 1-2% of the US population. The disease is caused by a selective loss of dopamine-producing neurons located in a specific region of the brain. This loss leads to significant motor function impairment and age-dependent tremors. Unfortunately there is currently no cure for PD, however a synthetic dopamine treatment (L-DOPA), temporarily alleviates symptoms.
  • The mechanism of PD progression is currently unknown. However, genetic studies have identified that mutations (changes) in multiple genes, including α-synuclein, LRRK2, uchL1, parkin, PINK1, DJ-1 and ATP13A2 cause familial PD. Although the familial form of PD only affects a small portion of PD cases, uncovering the function of these genes may provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to the majority of PD cases.
  • One of the best strategies to study PD mechanisms is to generate experimental models that mimic the initiation and progression of PD. A number of cellular and animal models have been developed for PD research. However, a model, which closely resembles the human degeneration process of PD, is currently not available because human neurons are unable to continuously propagate (grow) in culture. Human stem cells provide an opportunity to fulfill this task because these cells can grow and be programmed to generate dopamine nerve cells (the neurons under assault in PD patients).
  • In this study, we propose to create stem cell lines that either have the genetic background of sporadic PD patients or possess PD-associated mutations using cultured patient fibroblasts. These cell lines will in effect, represent a model of human PD degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Our working hypothesis is that the degeneration of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons and dopaminergic neurons in vivo via the same mechanism. We will fulfill three tasks in this study; 1/ To generate the PD-stem cell (PD-SCs) line which either have the genetic background of sporadic PD patients or harbor PD specific gene mutantions; 2/ To determine the whether the PD-SCs cell lines can form into midbrain dopaminergic nerve cells; 3/ To determine whether mutations in parkin and PINK1 effect the survival of dopaminergic neurons which are derived from the PD-SCs cells. Successful completion of this study will yield novel cellular models for studying the mechanisms involved in PD initiation and progression, and further screening remedies for PD treatment.
  • During last four years, we have finished to develop 15 lines of iPSCs. These include 5 lines from normal control individuals, 5 lines from sporadic Parkinson disease patients, and 5 lines from Parkinson disease patients harboring disease related mutations of PINK1, DJ-1 and PLA2G6 genes. These iPS lines are shown to have biochemical and genomic characteristics of human ES cells. These lines provide an unique opportunity to systematically study comparative pathophysiology of Parkinson disease using sporadic and genetic cases. Using these lines, we have identified a group of genes differentially expressed and differentially methylated between iPS cells derived from PD patients and iPS cells derived from normal control individuals. However, we recognize that iPSCs are more difficult to differentiate than the hESCs. We are yet to finalize the protocols to have all lines be differentiated in vitro. Our goal is to compare differences among the controls, sporadic PD and genetic PD at the level of cell biology and molecular biology.

Generation of clinical grade human iPS cells

Funding Type: 
New Cell Lines
Grant Number: 
RL1-00681
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 382 400
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Melanoma
Cancer
Muscular Dystrophy
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
The therapeutic use of stem cells depends on the availability of pluripotent cells that are not limited by technical, ethical or immunological considerations. The goal of this proposal is to develop and bank safe and well-characterized patient-specific pluripotent stem cell lines that can be used to study and potentially ameliorate human diseases. Several groups, including ours have recently shown that adult skin cells can be reprogrammed in the laboratory to create new cells that behave like embryonic stem cells. These new cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells should have the potential to develop into any cell type or tissue type in the body. Importantly, the generation of these cells does not require human embryos or human eggs. Since these cells can be derived directly from patients, they will be genetically identical to the patient, and cannot be rejected by the immune system. This concept opens the door to the generation of patient-specific stem cell lines with unlimited differentiation potential. While the current iPS cell technology enables us now to generate patient-specific stem cells, this technology has not yet been applied to derive disease-specific human stem cell lines for laboratory study. Importantly, these new cells are also not yet suitable for use in transplantation medicine. For example, the current method to make these cells uses retroviruses and genes that could generate tumors or other undesirable mutations in cells derived from iPS cells. Thus, in this proposal, we aim to improve the iPS cell reprogramming method, to make these cells safer for future use in transplant medicine. We will also generate a large number of iPS lines of different genetic or disease backgrounds, to allow us to characterize these cells for function and as targets to study new therapeutic approaches for various diseases. Lastly, we will establish protocols that would allow the preparation of these types of cells for clinical use by physicians investigating new stem cell-based therapies in a wide variety of diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Several groups, including ours have recently shown that adult skin cells can be reprogrammed in the laboratory to create new cells that behave like embryonic stem cells. These new cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells should have, similar to embryonic stem cells, the potential to develop into any cell type or tissue type in the body. This new technology holds great promise for patient-specific stem-cell based therapies, the production of in vitro models for human disease, and is thought to provide the opportunity to perform experiments in human cells that were not previously possible, such as screening for compounds that inhibit or reverse disease progression. The advantage of using iPS cells for transplantation medicine would be that the patient’s own cells would be reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell state and therefore, when transplanted back into the patient, the cells would not be attacked and destroyed by the body's immune system. Importantly, these new cells are not yet suitable for use in transplantation medicine or studies of human diseases, as their derivation results in permanent genetic changes, and their differentiation potential has not been fully studied. The goal of this proposal is to develop and bank genetically unmodified and well-characterized iPS cell lines of different genetic or disease backgrounds that can be used to characterize these cells for function and as targets to study new therapeutic approaches for various human diseases. We will establish protocols that would allow the preparation of these types of cells for clinical use by physicians investigating new stem cell-based therapies in a wide variety of diseases. Taken together, this would be beneficial to the people of California as tens of millions of Americans suffer from diseases and injuries that could benefit from such research. Californians will also benefit greatly as these studies should speed the transition of iPS cells to clinical use, allowing faster development of stem cell-based therapies.
Progress Report: 
  • The goal of this project is to develop and bank safe, well-characterized pluripotent stem cell lines that can be used to study and potentially ameliorate human diseases, and that are not limited by technical, ethical or immunological considerations. To that end, we proposed to establish protocols for generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) that would not involve viral vector integration, and that would be compatible with Good Manufacturing Processes (GMP) standards. To establish baseline characteristics of hiPSCs, we performed a complete molecular characterization of all existing hiPSCs in comparison to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We found that all hiPSC lines created to date, regardless of the method by which they were reprogrammed, shared a common gene expression signature, distinct from that of hESCs. The functional role of this gene expression signature is still unclear, but any lines that are generated under the guise of this grant will be subjected to a similar analysis to set the framework by which these new lines are functionally characterized. Our efforts to develop new strategies for the production of safe iPS cells have yielded many new cell lines generated by various techniques, all of which are safer than the standard retroviral protocol. We are currently expanding many of the hiPSCs lines generated and will soon demonstrate whether their gene expression profile, differentiation capability, and genomic stability make them suitable for banking in our iPSC core facility. Once fully characterized, these cells will be available from our bank for other investigators.
  • For hiPSC technology to be useful clinically, the procedures to derive these cells must be robust enough that iPSC can be obtained from the majority of donors. To determine the versatility of generation of iPS cells, we have now derived hiPSCs from commercially obtained fibroblasts derived from people of different ages (newborn through 66 years old) as well as from different races (Caucasian and mixed race). We are currently evaluating medium preparations that will be suitable for GMP-level use. Future work will ascertain the best current system for obtaining hiPSC, and establish GMP-compliant methodologies.
  • The goal of this project is to develop and bank safe, well-characterized pluripotent stem cell lines that can be used to study and potentially ameliorate human diseases. To speed this process, we are taking approaches that are not limited by technical, ethical or immunological considerations. We are establishing protocols for generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) that would not involve viral vector integration, and that are compatible with Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) standards. Our efforts to develop new strategies for the production of safe hiPSC have yielded many new cell lines generated by various techniques. We are characterizing these lines molecularly, and have found hiPSCs can be made that are nearly indistinguishable from human embryonic stem cells (hESC). We have also recently found in all the hiPSCs generated from female fibroblasts, none reactivated the X chromosome. This finding has opened a new frontier in the study and potential treatment of X-linked diseases. We are currently optimizing protocols to generate hiPSC lines that are derived, reprogrammed and differentiated in the absence of animal cell products, and preparing detailed standard operating procedures that will ready this technology for clinical utility.
  • This project was designed to generate protocols whereby human induced pluripotent stem cells could be generated in a manner consistent with use in clinical trials. This required optimization of protocols and generation of standard operating procedures such that animal products were not involved in generation and growth of the cells. We have successfully identified such a protocol as a resource to facilitate widespread adoption of these practices.

New Cell Lines for Huntington's Disease

Funding Type: 
New Cell Lines
Grant Number: 
RL1-00678
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 369 800
Disease Focus: 
Huntington's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with a 1/10,000 disease risk that always leads to death. These numbers do not fully reflect the large societal and familial cost of HD, which requires extensive caregiving and has a 50% chance of passing the mutation to the next generation. Current treatments treat some symptoms but do not change the course of disease. Symptoms of the disease include movement abnormalities, inability to perform daily tasks and and psychiatric problems. A loss os specific regions of the brain are observed. The mutation for HD is an expansion of a region of repeated DNA in the HD gene and the longer the repeat, in general the earlier the onset of disease. While the length of this polyglutamine repeat largely determines the age-of-onset, there is variance in onset age that is not accounted for by repeat length but is determined by genetic and environmental factors. In addition, the symptoms can vary significantly among patients in a non-repeat dependent manner. To assist in preventing onset of HD, there is a great need to identify genes that are involved in why one individual with 45 repeats will manifest symptoms at age 40 while another manifests symptoms at age 70. Further, there is a lack of early readouts to determine when to begin HD treatments. Because the disease mutation is known, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is possible and mutant Htt embryos are available. Stem cell lines can be derived from PGD embryos with varying repeat lengths and genetic backgrounds to provide new methods to identify genetic modifiers and readouts of disease progression. The development of pluripotent stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) cells, derived directly from HD patient fibroblasts, would also provide new methods for these analyses. Chemical compound screens to identify drugs that protect against the effect of mutant Htt protein expression in patient derived hESCs cells would allow evaluation of drug responses in on cells having different genetic backgrounds Ultimately, the iPS cells can provide a way to transplant neurons or neuronal support cells from affected individuals or from unaffected family members having a normal range repeat. Such cells would help reduce immune rejection effects likely to occur with transplantation, however, while patient-derived cells overcome the problems of immune rejection, the mutant protein is still expressed. To overcome this problem we will genetically modify these stem cells to reduce the mutant protein and produce a normal gene. Beyond the immediate application to HD, the development of these models is applicable to a range of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The disability and loss of earning power and personal freedom resulting from Huntington's disease (HD) is devastating and creates a financial burden for California. Individuals are struck in the prime of life, at a point when they are their most productive and have their highest earning potential. Further, as the disease progressives, individuals require institutional care facilities at great financial cost. Therapies using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the potential to change the lives of hundreds of individuals and their families, which brings the human cost into the thousands. Further, hESCs from HD patients will help us understand the factors that dictate the course of the disease and provide a resource for drug development. For the potential of hESCs in HD to be realized, a very forward approach such as that proposed will allow experienced investigators in HD and stem cell research and clinical trials to come together and create cell lines to more fully mimic the diseases neurons and allow for future treatment options. The federal constraints on hESCs create a critical need for the development of treatments using hESCs supported and staffed with non-federal funds. We have proposed goals and strategies for generating new stem cells derived from patient preimplantation diagnosis embryos and patient fibroblasts. We have put in place critical milestones to be met We will build on existing regional stem cell resources . Anticipated benefits to the citizens of California include: 1) development of new stem cell lines that will allow us to more closely model the disease for mechanistic studies and drug screening, 2) improved methods for following the course of the disease in order to treat HD as early as possible before symptoms are manifest; 3) development of new cell-based treatments for Huntington's disease with application to other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases that affect thousands of individuals in California; 4) development of intellectual property that could form the basis of new biotech startup companies; and 5) improved methods for drug development that could directly benefit citizens of the state.
Progress Report: 
  • Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with a 1/10,000 disease risk that always leads to death. These numbers do not fully reflect the large societal and familial cost of HD, which requires extensive caregiving and has a 50% chance of passing the mutation to the next generation. Current treatments treat some symptoms but do not change the course of disease. Symptoms of the disease include movement abnormalities, inability to perform daily tasks and psychiatric problems. A loss of specific regions of the brain are observed. The mutation for HD is an expansion of a region of repeated DNA in the HD gene and the longer the repeat, in general the earlier the onset of disease. While the length of this polyglutamine repeat largely determines the age-of-onset, there is variance in onset age that is not accounted for by repeat length but is determined by genetic and environmental factors. In addition, the symptoms can vary significantly among patients in a non-repeat dependent manner. There is a lack of early readouts to determine when to begin HD treatments. Because the disease mutation is known, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is possible and mutant Htt embryos are available. We have obtained a number of HD PGD embryos with varying repeat lengths and genetic backgrounds to derive hES cell lines and provide new methods to identify genetic modifiers and readouts of disease progression. Development of multiple lines has begun during this funding period. The development of pluripotent stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, derived directly from HD patient fibroblasts, also provide new methods for these analyses. We have begun the establishment of a bank of HD fibroblasts and have derived three new iPS lines to date with unique CAG repeat expansions. Characterization of the lines for HD phenotypes is in progress. An additional line is being generated and additional fibroblast collection from both HD patients and individuals who do not carry the HD gene is planned for the coming year to generate other sets of iPS lines. These lines will allow mechanistic studies and chemical compound screens to identify drugs that protect against the effect of mutant Htt protein expression in patient derived stem cells to be performed. Ultimately, the iPS cells will provide a way to transplant neurons or neuronal support cells from affected individuals or from unaffected family members having a normal range repeat. Such cells would help reduce immune rejection effects likely to occur with transplantation, however, while patient-derived cells overcome the problems of immune rejection, the mutant protein is still expressed. To overcome this problem we will genetically modify these stem cells to reduce the mutant protein and produce a normal gene in the next portion of the project.
  • Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease that strikes in mid-life and inevitably leads to death. As it is genetic, offspring of affected individuals are 50% at risk. Current medications treat some symptoms, which include movement abnormalities, inability to perform daily tasks and psychiatric problems, but do not change the course of disease. The mutation for HD is an expansion of a region of repeated DNA in the HD gene. In general, the longer the repeat the earlier the onset of disease. While the length of this polyglutamine repeat largely determines the age-of-onset, there is variance in onset age that is not accounted for by repeat length but is determined by genetic and environmental factors. In addition, the symptoms can vary significantly among patients in a non-repeat dependent manner. There is a lack of early readouts to determine when to begin HD treatments. Because the disease mutation is known, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is possible and mutant Htt embryos are available. We have obtained a number of HD PGD embryos with varying repeat lengths and genetic backgrounds to derive hES cell lines and have derived a line that is now fully characterized as a stem cell line. The development of pluripotent stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, derived directly from HD patient skin cells (fibroblasts), also provide new methods for these analyses. We have made significant progress in establishing a bank of HD fibroblasts and have derived seven new iPS lines to date with unique CAG repeat expansions. Characterization of the lines for HD phenotypes is either complete or in progress. Additional lines are being generated and additional fibroblast collection from both HD patients and individuals who do not carry the HD gene is planned for the coming year to generate other sets of iPS lines. These lines will allow mechanistic studies and chemical compound screens to identify drugs that protect against the effect of mutant Htt protein expression in patient derived stem cells to be performed.
  • Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease that strikes in mid-life and inevitably leads to death. As it is genetic, offspring of affected individuals are 50% at risk. Current medications treat some symptoms, which include movement abnormalities, inability to perform daily tasks and psychiatric problems, but do not change the course of disease. The mutation for HD is an expansion of a region of repeated DNA in the HD gene. In general, the longer the repeat the earlier the onset of disease. While the length of this polyglutamine repeat largely determines the age-of-onset, there is variance in onset age that is not accounted for by repeat length but is determined by genetic and environmental factors. In addition, the symptoms can vary significantly among patients in a non-repeat dependent manner. There is a lack of early readouts to determine when to begin HD treatments. Because the disease mutation is known, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is possible and mutant Htt embryos are available. We have obtained HD PGD embryos and have derived a line that is now fully characterized as a stem cell line that is capable of becoming brain cells. The development of pluripotent stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, derived directly from HD patient skin cells (fibroblasts), also provide new methods for these analyses. We have established a bank of HD fibroblasts and have derived seven new iPS lines with unique CAG repeat expansions. Characterization of the lines for HD symptoms is either complete or in progress. Additional lines are being generated and additional skin cells collected from both HD patients and individuals who do not carry the HD gene. These lines are allowing mechanistic studies and chemical compound screens to identify drugs that protect against the effect of mutant Htt protein expression in patient derived stem cells to be performed. Finally, we are developing a method to reduce the level of the mutant protein to provide options for future transplantation from an individual's own skin cells to prevent immune rejection.

Establishment of Frontotemporal Dementia Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cell Lines with Defined Genetic Mutations

Funding Type: 
New Cell Lines
Grant Number: 
RL1-00650
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 708 560
Disease Focus: 
Dementia
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
We propose to generate induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from skin cells derived from human subjects with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). FTD accounts for 15–20% of all dementia cases and, with newly identified genetic causes, is now recognized as the most common dementia in patients under 65 years of age. FTD patients suffer progressive neurodegeneration in the frontal and temporal lobes and other brain regions, resulting in behavioral changes and memory and motor neuron deficits. The median age of onset for this devastating disease is 58 years, and disease progression is rapid, with death in 3–8 years. Compared with other age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases, the molecular, cellular, and genetic bases of FTD remain poorly understood. Genetic causes are estimated to account for ~40% of FTD. In addition to tau identified in 1998, mutations in three causative genes have been identified during the last three years. The identification of FTD mutations opens exciting new avenues for understanding the causes of FTD. Research on these mutations will help to identify effective therapies. However, the ability to study the functions of these factors is severely limited due to the lack of available human neurons from FTD patients. To address the need for disease– and patient–specific neurons, we will use the powerful new technique of iPS cells. iPS cells are derived from skin cells and can be used to generate any cell types in the body, including neurons. We will obtain human skin cells from FTD patients with disease-causing mutations and generate many FTD mutation–specific iPS cell lines. We will then use these iPS cells to generate FTD mutation–specific neurons to study disease mechanisms. The bank of iPS cell lines we generate will also enable the development of sensitive assays for drug screening and testing of therapeutic agents for treating FTD. All cell lines will be made available to the global FTD research community. The generation of human neurons from FTD patients will be a tremendous advance toward finding a cure for this disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
California is the U.S. leader in basic research into stem cell–based therapies for disease. To help California remain at the forefront of research on neurological disease, we propose to use induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells—a revolutionary new technique developed recently by Dr. Shinya Yamanaka—to target frontotemporal dementia (FTD). FTD is a devastating and common form of dementia. {REDACTED} The proposed research will establish California as the leader in generating human patient–specific neurons from iPS cells. The potential long-term benefits to California include growth of the clinical enterprise in the diagnosis and treatment of FTD, the establishment of biotechnology to generate new drugs for FTD, and potential intellectual properties for driving private enterprises to develop therapies.
Progress Report: 
  • In this grant, we proposed to generate induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from skin cells derived from human subjects with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). FTD accounts for 15–20% of all dementia cases and, with newly identified genetic causes, is now recognized as the most common dementia in patients under 65 years of age. FTD patients suffer progressive neurodegeneration in the frontal and temporal lobes and other brain regions, resulting in behavioral changes and memory and motor neuron deficits. The median age of onset of this devastating disease is 58 years, and it progresses rapidly, causing death in 3–8 years. Compared with other age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases, the molecular, cellular, and genetic bases of FTD are poorly understood. Genetic causes are estimated to account for ~40% of FTD. In addition to tau identified in 1998, mutations in three causative genes have been identified during the last three years. The identification of FTD mutations opens exciting new avenues for understanding the causes of FTD. Research on these mutations will help to identify effective therapies. However, the ability to study the functions of these factors is severely limited due to the lack of available human neurons from FTD patients. To address the need for disease– and patient–specific neurons, we proposed to use the powerful new technique of iPS cells. iPS cells are derived from skin cells and can be used to generate any cell types in the body, including neurons. During the last 10 months, we have obtained human skin cells from more than 30 FTD patients with disease-causing mutations and unaffected family members. We have generated about 200 putative iPS cell lines from two FTD patients with defined genetic mutations, one sporadic case, and one control. We characterized some of the iPS cell lines and differentiated one patient-specific iPS cell line into human postmitotic neurons. These results represent a major advance toward finding a cure for FTD, and we will continue to pursue this line of research as proposed.
  • We have collected numerous skin samples from patients with a kind of dementia that affects the frontal lobes. We have also collected samples from unaffected family members (controls). For many of these samples we have made induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), which can give rise to any cell type. We are in the process of generating neurons from these stem cells. Our hope and intention is to study these cells to learn about the mechanisms that give rise to this dementia and to be able to test potential therapies.
  • We have collected numerous skin samples from patients with a kind of dementia that affects the frontal lobes. We have also collected samples from unaffected family members (controls). For many of these samples we have made induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), which can give rise to any cell type. We are in the process of generating neurons and other cell types, such as cells that mediate inflammation, from these stem cells. Our hope and intention is to study these cells to learn about the mechanisms that give rise to this dementia and to be able to test potential therapies.

MicroRNAs in Human Stem Cell Differentiation and Mental Disorders

Funding Type: 
SEED Grant
Grant Number: 
RS1-00462
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$791 000
Disease Focus: 
Autism
Neurological Disorders
Developmental Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Many mental disorders are closely associated with problems that occur during brain development in early life. For instance, by 2 years of age, autistic children have larger brains than normal kids, likely due to, at least in part, excess production of neurons and support cells, the building blocks of the nervous system. In autistic brains, how neurons grow various thread-like processes also shows some abnormalities. The cause of autism is complex and likely involves many genetic factors. These developmental defects are also associated with mental disorders caused by single-gene mutations, such as Rett syndrome and fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation, whose clinical features overlap with autism. However, what causes the developmental defects in brains of children with different mental disorders is largely unknown. In recent years, an exciting new regulatory pathway was discovered that may well contribute to the etiology of mental disorders. The major player in this novel pathway is a class of tiny molecules 21
Statement of Benefit to California: 
California is the most populated state in the US and has a large number of patients suffering from various mental disorders. The proposed studies in this grant application will contribute to the mission of developing novel avenues through stem cell research for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of mental disorders
Progress Report: 
  • Human stem cells, both embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, offer exciting opportunities for cell-based therapies in injured or diseased human brains or spinal cords. The clinical efficacy of grafted progenitor cells critically depends on their ability to migrate to the appropriate sites in the adult central nervous system without unwanted proliferation and tumor formation. However, little is known about the cellular behavior of human neural progenitor cells derived from human stem cells or how their proliferation and migration are coordinated. During this reporting period, we continued to study human neural progenitor cells derived from human stem cells, a cell culture system established during the prior reporting period. We focused on microRNAs, a class of small, noncoding RNAs of ~21–23 nucleotides that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. These small RNAs mostly destabilize target mRNAs or suppress their translation by binding to complementary sequences in the 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs). Our results obtained during this reporting period indicate that some microRNAs have very interesting functions in human neural progenitors, both in in vitro cell culture system and when transplanted into mouse brains. These new findings may have important implications for stem cell based therapies for neurodegenerative diseases or brain/spinal cord injuries.

Using human embryonic stem cells to treat radiation-induced stem cell loss: Benefits vs cancer risk

Funding Type: 
SEED Grant
Grant Number: 
RS1-00413
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$625 617
Disease Focus: 
Cancer
Neurological Disorders
Skeletal Muscle
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
A variety of stem cells exist in humans throughout life and maintain their ability to divide and change into multiple cell types. Different types of adult derived stem cells occur throughout the body, and reside within specific tissues that serve as a reserve pool of cells that can replenish other cells lost due to aging, disease, trauma, chemotherapy or exposure to ionizing radiation. When conditions occur that lead to the depletion of these adult derived stem cells the recovery of normal tissue is impaired and a variety of complications result. For example, we have demonstrated that when neural stem cells are depleted after whole brain irradiation a subsequent deficit in cognition occurs, and that when muscle stem cells are depleted after leg irradiation an accelerated loss of muscle mass occurs. While an increase in stem cell numbers after depletion has been shown to lead to some functional recovery in the irradiated tissue, such recovery is usually very prolonged and generally suboptimal.Ionizing radiation is a physical agent that is effective at reducing the number of adult stem cells in nearly all tissues. Normally people are not exposed to doses of radiation that are cause for concern, however, many people are subjected to significant radiation exposures during the course of clinical radiotherapy. While radiotherapy is a front line treatment for many types of cancer, there are often unavoidable side effects associated with the irradiation of normal tissue that can be linked to the depletion of critical stem cell pools. In addition, many of these side effects pose particular threats to pediatric patients undergoing radiotherapy, since children contain more stem cells and suffer higher absolute losses of these cells after irradiation.Based on the foregoing, we will explore the potential utility and risks associated with using human embryonic stem cells (hESC) in the treatment of certain adverse effects associated with radiation-induced stem cell depletion. Our experiments will directly address whether hESCs can be used to replenish specific populations of stem cells in the brain and muscle depleted after irradiation in efforts to prevent subsequent declines in cognition and muscle mass respectively. In addition to using hESC to hasten the functional recovery of tissue after irradiation, we will also test whether implantation of such unique cells holds unforeseen risks for the development of cancer. Evidence suggests that certain types of stem cells may be prone to cancer, and since little is known regarding this issue with respect to hESC, we feel this critical issue must be addressed. Thus, we will investigate whether hESC implanted into animals develop into tumors over time. The studies proposed here comprise a first step in determining how useful hESCs will be in the treatment of humans exposed to ionizing radiation, as well as many other diseases where adult stem cell depletion might be a concern.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Radiotherapy is a front line treatment used in California for many types of cancer, including brain, breast, prostate, bone and other cancer types presenting surgical complications. Treatment of these cancers through the use of radiation is however, often associated with side effects caused by the depletion of critical stem cell pools contained within non-cancerous normal tissue. While radiotherapy is clearly beneficial overall, many of these side effects have no viable treatment options. If we can demonstrate that human embryonic stem cells (hESC) hold promise as a safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of radiation-induced stem cell depletion, then cancer patients may have a new treatment for countering many of the debilitating side effects associated with radiotherapy. Once developed this new technology could position California to attract cancer patients throughout the United States, and the state would clearly benefit from the increased economic activity associated with a rise in patient numbers.
Progress Report: 
  • We have undertaken an extensive series of studies to delineate the radiation response of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human neural stem cells (hNSCs) both in vitro and in vivo. These studies are important because radiotherapy is a frontline treatment for primary and secondary (metastatic) brain tumors. While radiotherapy is quite beneficial, it is limited by the tolerance of normal tissue to radiation injury. At clinically relevant exposures, patients often develop variable degrees of cognitive dysfunction that manifest as impaired learning and memory, and that have pronounced adverse effects on quality of life. Thus, our studies have been designed to address this serious complication of cranial irradiation.
  • We have now found that transplanted human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can rescue radiation-induced cognitive impairment in athymic rats, providing the first evidence that such cells can ameliorate radiation-induced normal-tissue damage in the brain. Four months following head-only irradiation and hESC transplantation, the stem cells were found to have migrated toward specific regions of the brain known to support the development of new brain cells throughout life. Cells migrating toward these specialized neural regions were also found to develop into new brain cells. Cognitive analyses of these animals revealed that the rats who had received stem cells performed better in a standard test of brain function which measures the rats’ reactions to novelty. The data suggests that transplanted hESCs can rescue radiation-induced deficits in learning and memory. Additional work is underway to determine whether the rats’ improved cognitive function was due to the functional integration of transplanted stem cells or whether these cells supported and helped repair the rats’ existing brain cells.
  • The application of stem cell therapies to reduce radiation-induced normal tissue damage is still in its infancy. Our finding that transplanted hESCs can rescue radiation-induced cognitive impairment is significant in this regard, and provides evidence that similar types of approaches hold promise for ameliorating normal-tissue damage throughout other target tissues after irradiation.
  • A comprehensive series of studies was undertaken to determine if/how stem cell transplantation could ameliorate the adverse effects of cranial irradiation, both at the cellular and cognitive levels. These studies are important since radiotherapy to the head remains the only tenable option for the control of primary and metastatic brain tumors. Unfortunately, a devastating side-effect of this treatment involves cognitive decline in ~50% of those patients surviving ≥ 18 months. Pediatric patients treated for brain tumors can lose up to 3 IQ points per year, making the use of irradiation particularly problematic for this patient class. Thus, the purpose of these studies was to determine whether cranial transplantation of stem cells could afford some relief from the cognitive declines typical in patients afflicted with brain tumors, and subjected to cranial radiotherapy. Human embryonic (hESCs) and neural (hNSCs) stem cells were implanted into the brain of rats following head only irradiation. At 1 and 4 months later, rats were tested for cognitive performance using a series of specialized tests designed to determine the extent of radiation injury and the extent that transplanted cells ameliorated any radiation-induced cognitive deficits. These cognitive tasks take advantage of the innate tendency of rats to explore novelty. Successful performance of this task has been shown to rely on intact spatial memory function, a brain function known to be adversely impacted by irradiation. Our data shows that irradiation elicits significant deficits in learning and spatial task recognition 1 and 4-months following irradiation. We have now demonstrated conclusively, and for the first time, that irradiated animals receiving targeted transplantation of hESCs or hNSCs 2-days after, show significant recovery of these radiation induced cognitive decrements. In sum, our data shows the capability of 2 stem cell types (hESC and hNSC) to improve radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction at 1 and 4 months post-grafting, and demonstrates that stem cell based therapies can be used to effectively to reduce a serious complication of cranial irradiation.

Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Remyelination in a Viral Model of Demyelination

Funding Type: 
SEED Grant
Grant Number: 
RS1-00409
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$425 594
Disease Focus: 
Multiple Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Immune Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common neurologic disease affecting young adults under the age of 40 with the majority of MS patients diagnosed in the second or third decade of life. MS is characterized by the gradual loss of the myelin sheath that surrounds and insulates axons that allow for the conduction of nerve impulses – a process known as demyelination. For unknown reasons, the ability to remyelinate axons is impaired in MS patients making recovery of motor skills difficult. Therefore, developing novel and effective approaches to remyelinate axons in MS patients would dramatically improve the quality of life of many MS patients. The experiments described in this research proposal utilize a well-accepted model of MS to further characterize the potential clinical applicability of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to remyelinate axons. Such knowledge is crucial in order to increase our understanding of stem cells with regards to treatment of numerous human diseases including MS.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
California is the most populated state in the USA. As such, the costs of medical care for the treatment of patients with chronic diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) represents a significant and growing problem. MS is the most common neurologic disease affecting young adults under the age of 40 with the majority of MS patients diagnosed in the second or third decade of life. Given the population of California, there are many MS patients living in the state and the numbers will undoubtedly grow. It is unusual for MS patients to die from the disease and many will live normal life spans but will develop an increasing array of medical problems stemming from the progression of neurologic damage associated with MS. MS is characterized by the gradual loss of the myelin sheath that surrounds and insulates axons that allow for the conduction of nerve impulses – a process known as demyelination. For unknown reasons, the ability to remyelinate axons is impaired in MS patients making recovery of motor skills difficult. Therefore, developing novel and effective approaches to remyelinate axons in MS patients would dramatically alleviate some of the burden placed on the medical community by improving the quality of life of many MS patients. The experiments described in this research proposal utilize a well-accepted model of MS to further characterize the potential clinical applicability of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to remyelinate axons. Such knowledge is crucial in order to increase our understanding of stem cells with regards to treatment of human diseases with the ultimate goal of limiting patient suffering and reducing medical costs.
Progress Report: 
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that results in demyelination and axonal loss, culminating in extensive disability through defects in neurologic function. The demyelination that defines MS pathology is progressive over time; however, studies indicate that myelin repair can occur during the course of disease in patients with MS and in animal models designed to mimic the immunopathogenesis of MS. While it is generally thought that endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are largely responsible for spontaneous remyelination, it is unclear why these cells are only able to transiently induce myelin repair in the presence of ongoing disease. Along these lines, two therapies for demyelinating diseases look promising; implanting OPCs into sites of neuroinflammation that are directly capable of inducing remyelination of the damaged axons and/or modifying the local environment to stimulate and support remyelination by endogenous OPCs. Indeed, we have shown that human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived oligodendrocytes surgically implanted into the spinal cords of mice with virally induced demyelination promoted focal remyelination and axonal sparing. We are currently investigating how the implanted OPCs positionally migrate to areas of on-going demyelination and the role these cells play in repairing the damaged CNS. The purpose of this research is to identify the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for hESC-induced remyelination.
  • Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are important in mediating remyelination in response to demyelinating lesions. As such, OPCs represent an attractive cell population for use in cell replacement therapies to promote remyelination for treatment of human demyelinating diseases. High-purity OPCs have been generated from hESC and have been shown to initiate remyelination associated with improved motor skills in animal models of demyelination. We have previously determined that engraftment of hESC-derived OPCs into mice with established demyelination does not significantly improve clinical recovery nor reduce the severity of demyelination. Importantly, remyelination is limited following OPC transplantation. These findings highlight that the microenvironment is critical with regards to the remyelination potential of engrafted cells. In addition, we have determined that human OPCs are capable of migrating in response to proinflammatory molecules often associated with human neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis. This is an important observation in that it will likely be necessary for engrafted OPCs to be able to positionally navigate within tissue in order to move from the site of surgical transplantation to areas of damage to initiate repair and tissue remodeling. Finally, we have also made a novel discovery of a unique signaling pathway that protects OPCs from damage/death in response to treatment with proinflammatory cytokines. We believe this is an important and translationally relevant observation as OPCs are critical in contributing to remyelination and remyelination failure is an important clinical feature for many human demyelinating diseases inclusing spinal cord injury and MS. We have identified a putative protective ligand/receptor interaction affords protection from cytokine-induced apoptosis. These findings may reveal novel avenues for therapeutic intervention to prevent damage/death of OPCs and enhance remyelination.

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