Heart Disease

Coding Dimension ID: 
295
Coding Dimension path name: 
Heart Disease

Metabolic regulation of cardiac differentiation and maturation

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-07356
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 124 834
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Cells in the body take up nutrients from their environment and metabolize them in a complex set of biochemical reactions to generate energy and replicate. Control of these processes is particularly important for heart cells, which need large amounts of energy to drive blood flow throughout the body. Not surprisingly, the nutritional requirements of heart cells are very different than those of stem cells. This proposal will investigate the metabolism of pluripotent stem cells and how this changes during differentiation to cardiac cells. We will determine which nutrients are important to make functional heart cells and use this information to optimize growth conditions for producing heart cells for regenerative medicine and basic biology applications. We accomplish this by feeding cells nutrients (sugar, fat) labeled with isotopes. As these labeled molecules are consumed, the isotopes are incorporated into different metabolites which we track using mass spectrometry. This advanced technique will allow us to see how sugars and fat are metabolized inside stem cells and cardiac cells obtained through differentiation. We will also study the electrical activity of these heart cells to ensure that adequate nutrients are provided for the generation of cells with optimal function. Ultimately, this project will lead to new methods for producing functional heart cells for regenerative medicine and may also lead to insights into how cardiac cells malfunction in heart disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in California. As a result, much of the regenerative medicine community in the state and the many Californians suffering from heart failure are interested in obtaining functional heart cells from stem cells. Our work will identify the most important nutrients required to coax stem cell-derived heart cells to behave like true adult heart cells. This information will make more effective cell models for researchers and companies to study how this disease affects heart cell metabolism. Since enzymes are highly targetable with drugs, the basic scientific findings from our work will be of great interest to California biotechnology companies and can stimulate job growth in the state. Our findings will also provide insight into very specific types of genetic heart disease, and this work may lead to additional grants from federal funding sources, bringing about additional revenue and job growth in California. A better understanding of how different nutrients influence heart cell function may provide guidance into new treatment strategies for heart disease. Finally, this work will highlight the importance of diet, nutrition, and healthy heart function, providing useful information relating to public health.

Improving Existing Drugs for Long QT Syndrome type 3 (LQT3) by hiPSC Disease-in-Dish Model

Funding Type: 
Early Translational IV
Grant Number: 
TR4-06857
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$6 361 618
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
This project uses patient hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to develop a safe and effective drug to treat a serious heart health condition. This research and product development will provide a novel method for a human genetic heart disorder characterized by long delay (long Q-T interval) between heart beats caused by mutations in the Na+ channel α subunit. Certain patients are genetically predisposed to a potentially fatal arrhythmogenic response to existing drugs to treat LQT3 since the drugs have off-target effects on other important ion channels in cardiomyocytes. We will use patient-derived hiPSC-cardiomyocytes to develop a safer drug (development candidate, DC) that will retain efficacy against the "leaky" Na+-channel yet minimize off-target effects in particular against the K+ hERG channel that can be responsible for the existing drug’s pro-arrhythmic effect. Since this problem is thought to occur severely in patients with the common KCHN2 variant, K897T (~33% of the white population), removing the off-target liability addresses a serious unmet clinical need. Futher, since we propose to modify an existing drug (i.e., do drug rescue), the path from patient-specific hiPSCs to clinic might be easier than for a completely new chemical entity. Lastly, an appealing aspect is that the hiPSCs were derived from a child to test his therapy, & we aim to produce a better drug for his treatment. Our goal is to complete development of the DC and initiate IND-enabling in vivo studies.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
In the US, an estimated 850,000 adults are hospitalized for arrhythmias each year, making arrhythmias one of the top five causes of healthcare expenditures in the US with a direct cost of more than $40 billion annually for diagnosis, treatment & rehabilitation. The State of California has approximately 12% of the US population which translates to 102,000 individuals hospitalized every year for arrhythmias. Another 30,000 Californians die of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome every year. Arrhythmias are very common in older adults and because the population of California is aging, research to address this issue is important for human health and the State economy. Most serious arrhythmias affect people older than 60. This is because older adults are more likely to have heart disease & other health problems that can lead to arrhythmias. Older adults also tend to be more sensitive to the side effects of medicines, some of which can cause arrhythmias. Some medicines used to treat arrhythmias can even cause arrhythmias as a side effect. In the US, atrial fibrillation (a common type of arrhythmia that can cause problems) affects millions of people & the number is rising. Accordingly, the same problem is present in California. Thus, successful completion of this work will not only provide citizens of California much needed advances in cardiovascular health technology & improvement in health care but an improved heart drug. This will provide high paying jobs & significant tax revenue.

The CIRM Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Biorepository – A Resource for Safe Storage and Distribution of High Quality iPSCs

Funding Type: 
hPSC Repository
Grant Number: 
IR1-06600
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$9 999 834
Disease Focus: 
Developmental Disorders
Heart Disease
Infectious Disease
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Autism
Respiratory Disorders
Vision Loss
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Critical to the long term success of the CIRM iPSC Initiative of generating and ensuring the availability of high quality disease-specific human IPSC lines is the establishment and successful operation of a biorepository with proven methods for quality control, safe storage and capabilities for worldwide distribution of high quality, highly-characterized iPSCs. Specifically the biorepository will be responsible for receipt, expansion, quality characterization, safe storage and distribution of human pluripotent stem cells generated by the CIRM stem cell initiative. This biobanking resource will ensure the availability of the highest quality hiPSC resources for researchers to use in disease modeling, target discovery and drug discovery and development for prevalent, genetically complex diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients and subsequently, the ability to differentiate these iPSCs into disease-relevant cell types holds great promise in facilitating the “disease-in-a-dish” approach for studying our understanding of the pathological mechanisms of human disease. iPSCs have already proven to be a useful model for several monogenic diseases such as Parkinson’s, Fragile X Syndrome, Schizophrenia, Spinal Muscular Atrophy, and inherited metabolic diseases such as 1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial hypercholesterolemia, and glycogen storage disease. In addition, the differentiated cells obtained from iPSCs represent a renewable, disease-relevant cell model for high-throughput drug screening and toxicology/safety assessment which will ultimately lead to the successful development of new therapeutic agents. iPSCs also hold great hope for advancing the use of live cells as therapies for correcting the physiological manifestations caused by disease or injury.

Tissue Collection for Accelerating iPSC Research in Cardiovascular Diseases

Funding Type: 
Tissue Collection for Disease Modeling
Grant Number: 
IT1-06596
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 435 371
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Heart failure is a very common and chronic condition defined by an inability of the heart to pump blood effectively. Over half of cases of heart failure are caused by a condition called dilated cardiomyopathy, which involves dilation of the heart cavity and weakening of the muscle. Importantly, many cases of this disease do not have a known cause and are called “idiopathic” (i.e., physicians do not know why). Over the past 2 decades, doctors and scientists started realizing the disease can cluster in families, leading them to think there is a genetic cause to the disease. This resulted in discovering multiple genes that cause this disease. Nonetheless, the majority of cases of dilated hearts that cluster in families do not have a known genetic cause. Now scientists can turn blood and skin cells into heart cells by genetically manipulating them and creating engineered stem cells called “induced pluripotent stem cells” or iPSCs. This approach enables the scientists to study what chemical or genetic changes are happening to cause the problem. Also because these cells behave similar to the cells in the heart, scientists can now test new medicines on these cells first before trying them in patients. Here we aim to collect tissue from 800 patients without a known cause for their dilated hearts (and 200 control individuals) to help accelerate our understanding of this debilitating disease and hopefully offer new and better treatments.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Heart failure is a significant health burden in California with rising hospitalization and death rates in the state. We have a very limited understanding of the disease and so far the existing treatments only slow down the disease and the changes that happen rather than target the root cause. By studying a subgroup of the dilated cardiomyopathy patients who have no identified cause, we can work on identifying genetic causes of the disease, some of the biology happening inside the heart cell, and provide new treatments that can prevent the disease from happening or progressing. Improving the outcome of this debilitating disease and providing new treatments will go a long way to helping a large group of Californians lead healthier and longer lives. There are estimates that the US economy loses $10 billion (not counting medical costs), because heart failure patients are unable to work. Hence new knowledge and developments gained from this research can go a long way to ameliorating that cost. Finally, heart failure is the most common chronic disease patients in California are hospitalized for. This research targets over half of those admissions. If this research is able to cut the hospitalization rate even by 1%, this would translate to millions of dollars in savings to the state. Continuing to invest in innovation will make our state a hotbed for the biotechnology industry, which in turn advances the state’s economic and educational status.

Preclinical evaluation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitors

Funding Type: 
New Faculty Physician Scientist
Grant Number: 
RN3-06378
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 105 388
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Because the regenerative capacity of adult heart is limited, any substantial cell loss as a result of a heart attack is mostly irreversible and may lead to progressive heart failure. Human pluripotent stem cells can be differentiated to heart cells, but their properties when transplanted into an injured heart remain unresolved. We propose to perform preclinical evaluation for transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac cells into the injured heart of an appropriate animal model. However, an important issue that has limited the progress to clinical use is their fate upon transplantation; that is whether they are capable of integrating into their new environment or they will function in isolation at their own pace. As an analogy, the performance of a symphony can go into chaos if one member plays in isolation from all surrounding cues. Therefore, it is important to determine if the transplanted cells can beat in harmony with the rest of the heart and if these cells will provide functional benefit to the injured heart. We plan to isolate cardiac cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells, transplant them into the model’s injured heart, determine if they result in improvement of the heart function, and perform detailed electrophysiology studies to determine their integration into the host tissue. The success of the proposed project will set the platform for future clinical trails of stem cell therapy for heart disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Heart disease remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the US with an estimated annual cost of over $300 billion. In California alone, more than 70,000 people die every year from cardiovascular diseases. Despite major advancement in treatments for patients with heart failure, which is mainly due to cellular loss upon myocardial injury, the mortality rate remains high. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) could provide an attractive therapeutic option to treat patients with damaged heart. We propose to isolate heart cells from hESCs and transplant them in an injured animal model's heart and study their fate. In the process, we will develop reagents that can be highly valuable for future research and clinical studies. The reagents generated in these studies can be patented forming an intellectual property portfolio shared by the state and the institution where the research is carried out. Most importantly, the research that is proposed in this application could lead to future stem cell-based therapies that would restore heart function after a heart attack. We expect that California hospitals and health care entities will be first in line for trials and therapies. Thus, California will benefit economically and it will help advance novel medical care.

Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiovascular Progenitor Cells for Cardiac Cell Therapy.

Funding Type: 
New Faculty Physician Scientist
Grant Number: 
RN3-06455
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 179 315
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Despite therapeutic advances, cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in California. Regenerative therapies that restore normal function after a heart attack would have an enormous societal and financial impact. Although very promising, regenerative cardiac cell therapy faces a number of challenges and technological hurdles. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) allow the potential to deliver patient specific, well-defined cardiac progenitor cells (CPC) for regenerative clinical therapies. We propose to translate recent advances in our lab into the development of a novel, well-defined hiPSC-derived CPC therapy. All protocols will be based on clinical-grade, FDA-approvable, animal product-free methods to facilitate preclinical testing in a large animal model. This application will attempt to translate these findings by: -Developing techniques and protocols utilizing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac progenitor cells at yields adequate to conduct preclinical large animal studies. -Validation of therapeutic activity will be in small and large animal models of ischemic heart disease by demonstrating effectiveness of hiPSC-derived CPCs in regenerating damaged myocardium post myocardial infarction in small and large animal models. This developmental candidate and techniques described here, if shown to be a feasible alternative to current approaches, would offer a novel approach to the treatment of ischemic heart disease.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in California and the US costing the healthcare system greater than 300 billion dollars a year. Although current therapies slow progression of heart disease, there are few options to reverse or repair the damaged heart. The limited ability of the heart to regenerate following a heart attack results in loss of function and heart failure. Human clinical trials testing the efficacy of adult stem cell therapy to restore mechanical function after a heart attack, although promising, have had variable results with modest improvements. The discovery of human induced pluripotent stem cells offers a potentially unlimited renewable source for patient specific cardiac progenitor cells. However, practical application of pluripotent stem cells or their derivatives face a number of challenges and technological hurdles. We have demonstrated that cardiac progenitor cells, which are capable of differentiating into all cardiovascular cell types, are present during normal fetal development and can be isolated from human induced pluripotent stem cells. We propose to translate these findings into a large animal pre-clinical model and eventually to human clinical trials. This could lead to new therapies that would restore heart function after a heart attack preventing heart failure and death. This will have tremendous societal and financial benefits to patients in California and the US in treating heart failure.
Progress Report: 
  • Cardiovascular disease remains to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in California and the United States. Despite the best medical therapies, none address the issue of irreversible myocardial tissue loss after a heart attack and thus there has been a great interest to develop approaches to induce regeneration. Our lab has focused on harvesting the full potential of patient specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to use to attempt to regenerate the damaged tissue. We believe that these iPSCs can be potentially used in the future to generate sufficient number of cells to be implanted in the damaged heart to regenerate the lost tissue post heart attack. Our lab has studied how these cardiac progenitors evolve in the developing heart and applied our finding to iPSCs to recapitulate the cardiac progenitors to ultimately use in clinical therapies. We have successfully derived these cardiac progenitors from patient derived iPSCs in a clinical grade fashion to ensure that we can apply same protocols in the future to clinical use if we are successful in demonstrating the efficacy of this therapy in our translational large animal studies that we will be conducting.

Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffold Augmented with Human Stem Cells for Cardiovascular Repair

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05626
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$4 939 140
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
An estimated 16.3 million Americans suffer from coronary heart disease. Every 25 seconds, someone has a coronary event and every minute, someone dies from one. Treatment for coronary heart disease has improved greatly in recent years, yet 1 in 6 deaths in the US in 2007 was still caused by this terrible disease. Stem cells have been used as an supplemental form of treatment but they have been most effective for patients treated immediately after their first heart attack. Unfortunately, stem cell therapy for chronic heart disease and heart failure has been less successful. With current delivery methods for stem cells into the heart, most are washed away quickly, whereas our device will hold them in the area that needs repair. With this project we are testing a novel approach to improve the benefits of stem cell therapy for patients suffering from chronic heart disease. By applying a type of bone marrow stem cells known to enhance tissue repair (mesenchymal stem cells) to a biological scaffold, we hope to greatly amplify the beneficial properties of both the stem cells and the biological scaffold. This device will be implanted onto an appropriate preclinical model that have been treated so as to mirror the chronic heart disease seen in humans. We predict that this novel device will heal the damaged heart and improve its function to pave the way for a superior treatment option for the thousands of Americans for whom the unlikely prospect of a heart transplant is currently the only hope.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Heart disease is the number one cause of death and disability in California and in the US as a whole. An estimated 16.3 million Americans over the age of 20 suffer from coronary heart disease (CHD) with an estimated associated cost of $177.5 billion and CHD accounted for 1 in 6 deaths in the US in 2007. Advances in treatment have decreased early mortality but consequently lead to an increase in the incidences of heart failure (HF). Patients with HF have a 50 percent readmission rate within six months, which is a heavy cost both in terms of quality of life and finances. The high cost of caring for patients with HF results primarily from frequent hospital readmissions for exacerbations. The need for efficient treatment strategies that address the underlying cause, massive loss of functional myocardium, is yet to be met. We believe that present project proposal, development of a combined mesenchymal stem cell and extra cellular matrix scaffold device, will lead to improved standards of care for patients suffering from chronic myocardial infarction who are thus at risk of developing HF. By not only retarding disease progression but by actually restoring cardiac function, we believe that the proposed project will have a tremendous impact on both the cost of care as well as the quality of life for large groups of Californians and patients worldwide for whom the improbable prospect of heart transplantation is the only curative treatment option available.
Progress Report: 
  • Heart disease is a major cause of death and disability in the US, accounting for 1 in every 4 deaths and costing more than 100 billion annually. While significant improvements have been made towards treating and managing heart disease, we are still not able to effectively return the heart to a healthy state and cure the patients. With our project we have set out to develop a novel strategy for not only halting the disease progression but to reverse the devastating effect on the function of the heart. By combining bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells with a biological scaffold material, we hope to create a patch for the heart that will support and regenerate the diseased tissue to the point where the patient will be relieved of the burden of their disease and have a markedly improve quality of life. We have in the past year made significant advances toward establishing an animal disease model in which we can study novel ways of treating heart disease. We have in the same time isolated and characterized cells that reside in the bone marrow and that have the potential to heal the diseased tissue by improving blood flow, minimize scarring and generally promoting recovery of the heart function. We have studies these cells under when grown under different conditions and found their ability to mediate tissue regeneration to be highly dependent on their local environments. We are currently trying to identify the optimal combination of cells and microenvironment that may achieve maximal regenerative effect in our disease model and ultimately help our patient combat their heart disease.

Heart Repair with Human Tissue Engineered Myocardium

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05556
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$4 766 231
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Heart disease is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in the US. With an estimated 1.5 million new or recurrent myocardial infarctions, the total economic burden on our health care system is enormous. Although conventional pharmacotherapy and surgical interventions often improve cardiac function and quality of life, many patients continue to develop refractory symptoms. Thus, the development of new therapies is urgently needed. “Tissue engineering” can be broadly defined as the application of novel bioengineering methods to understand complex structure-function relationships in normal or pathological conditions and the development of biological substitutes to restore, maintain, or improve function. It is different from “cell therapy”, which is designed to improve the function of an injured tissue by simply injecting suspensions of isolated cells into the injury site. To date, two main limitations of cell therapy are (1) acute donor cell death due to unfavorable seeding environment and (2) the lack of suitable cell type that genuinely resembles human cardiac cells. Our proposal seeks to use engineered tissue patches seeded with human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for treatment of ischemic heart disease in small and large animal models. It represents a significant development of novel techniques to address both of the main limitations of cell therapy, and will provide a new catalyst for the entire field of stem cell-based tissue engineering.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Patients with end-stage heart failure have a 2-year survival rate of 25% by conventional medical therapy. Not commonly known to the public is that this dismal survival rate is actually worse when compared to patients with AIDS, liver cirrhosis, or stroke. Following a heart failure, the endogenous repair process is not sufficient to compensate for cardiomyocyte death. Thus, novel therapies with stem cells in combination with supportive scaffolds to form engineered cardiac tissue grafts is emerging as a promising therapeutic avenue. Engineered tissues have now been used to make new bladders for patients needing cystoplasty, bioarticial heart patches seeded with bone marrow cells, and more recently new trachea for patient with late stage tracheal cancer. Our multi-disciplinary team intends to push the therapeutic envelop by developing human tissue engineered myocardium for treatment of post-myocardial infarction heart failure. We will first test our engineered cardiac tissue in small and large animal models. We will perform extensive quality control measures to define morphological, molecular, and functional properties. At the end of 3 years, we are confident we will be able to derive a lead candidate that can move into IND-enabling preclinical development. These discoveries will benefit the millions of patients with heart failure in California and globally.
Progress Report: 
  • Despite advances in medical and device therapies, patients with end-stage heart failure have a survival rate of only 25% during the first 2 years following their diagnosis. Heart failure typically follows from damage induced by severe myocardial infarction (MI; heart attack). After a severe MI, the human heart may lose up to 1 billion heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes). For most of these patients, heart transplantation is the only useful therapy, but there is a severe shortage of donor hearts. Recently, left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have become available to take over the pumping function of the crucial left ventricle chamber of the heart. These devices were originally used as “bridge to transplant” (a temporary measure to keep patients alive until a new heart became available); recently some patients have received LVADs as “destination therapies” (permanent substitutes for transplanted hearts). The problems associated with these mechanical implants, however, include increased risk of stroke (blood clots that form due to the devices) and infection (the LVADs are powered from batteries that are carried outside the body and require wires to pierce the skin).
  • We are working to develop cardiac regenerative medicine using Engineered Heart Muscle (EHM). We are using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) because they can be grown in very large quantities and, with the appropriate methods, can be triggered to differentiate into the cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts and smooth muscle that are lost after MI. Because these cells can be produced in essentially unlimited quantities, we could theoretically treat a very large number of patients who currently have no options.
  • During the first year of this project, we have a) established methods for producing the multi-billion quantities of hESC-derived cells needed to address this problem; b) developed methods to freeze and ship these cells to our collaborator in Germany for EHM assembly, and c) used these cells to generate 2 different forms of EHMs to compare their survival and function both in vitro (composition, force generated) and in vivo (after transplantation into rats that have been given MIs). We are now refining the EHM design with the goal of moving forward to testing them in animals with more human-like hearts (based on size and heart rate); this step will be essential to evaluate their safety and function before any clinical trial.

Direct Cardiac Reprogramming for Heart Regeneration

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05593
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$6 319 110
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Directly Reprogrammed Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Heart disease is a leading cause of mortality. The underlying pathology is typically loss of heart muscle cells that leads to heart failure. Because heart muscle has little or no regenerative capacity after birth, current therapeutic approaches are limited for the over 5 million Americans who suffer from heart failure. Our recent findings regarding direct reprogramming of a type of structural cell of the heart, called fibroblasts, into cardiac muscle-like cells using just three genes offers a novel approach to achieving cardiac regeneration. 50% of cells in the human heart are cardiac fibroblasts, providing a potential source of new heart muscle cells for regenerative therapy. We simulated a heart attack in mice by blocking the coronary artery, and have been able to reprogram existing mouse cardiac fibroblasts in to new muscle by delivering the three genes into the heart. We found a significant reduction in scar size and an improvement in cardiac function that persists after injury. The reprogramming of cells in the intact organ was more complete than in cells in a dish. We now propose to develop the optimal gene therapy approach to introduce cardiac reprogramming genes into the heart, to establish the optimal delivery approach to administer virus encoding cardiac reprogramming factors that results in improvement in cardiac function in a preclinical model of cardiac injury, and to establish the safety profile of in vivo cardiac reprogramming in a preclinical model.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This research will benefit the state of California and its citizens by helping develop a new therapeutic approach to cardiac regeneration. Heart disease is a leading cause of death in adults and children in California, but there is no current treatment that can promote cardiac regeneration. This proposal will lay the groundwork for a clinical trial that could result in generation of new heart muscle cells from within the heart. If successful, there is potential economic benefit in terms of productive lives saved and in the commercialization of this technology.
Progress Report: 
  • Heart disease is a leading cause of mortality. The underlying pathology is typically loss of heart muscle cells that leads to heart failure. Because heart muscle has little or no regenerative capacity after birth, current therapeutic approaches are limited for the over 5 million Americans who suffer from heart failure. Our recent findings regarding direct reprogramming of a type of structural cell of the heart, called fibroblasts, into cardiac muscle-like cells using just three genes offers a novel approach to achieving cardiac regeneration. 50% of cells in the human heart are cardiac fibroblasts, providing a potential source of new heart muscle cells for regenerative therapy. We simulated a heart attack in mice by blocking the coronary artery, and have been able to reprogram existing mouse cardiac fibroblasts into new muscle by delivering the three genes into the heart. We found a significant reduction in scar size and an improvement in cardiac function that persists after injury. The reprogramming of cells in the intact organ was more complete than in cells in a dish. We now identified a combination of factors that reprogram human and pig cardiac fibroblasts and are optimizing a gene therapy approach to introduce cardiac reprogramming genes into the heart of pigs. In a pig model of cardiac injury, these factors were able to convert non-muscle cells into new muscle in the area of injury. We also found a viral vector that can preferentially infect the fibroblasts compare to the muscle cells. We are now in a position to test for functional improvement in pigs.

Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes for Patients with End Stage Heart Failure

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Therapy Planning I
Grant Number: 
DR2-05394
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$108 895
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Patients with end-stage heart failure (ESHF) have a 2-year survival rate of 50% with conventional medical therapy. This dismal survival rate is actually significantly worse than patients with AIDS, liver cirrhosis, stroke, and other debilitating diseases. Stem cell therapy may be a promising strategy for inducing myocardial regeneration via paracrine activation, prevention of cardiac apoptosis, and other mechanisms. Several studies have convincingly shown that human embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) and that these cells can be used to effectively improve cardiac function following myocardial infarction (MI). The objectives of this CIRM Disease Team Therapy proposal are two-fold: (1) to perform IND enabling studies involving hESC-CM for subsequent FDA approval and (2) to complete a Phase I trial with ESHF patients undergoing the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) procedure whereby hESC-CMs will be injected at the same time.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the number one cause of mortality and morbidity in the US. Following myocardial infarction (MI), the limited ability of the surviving cardiac cells to proliferate thereafter renders the damaged heart susceptible to dangerous consequences such as heart failure. In recent years, stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising candidate for treating ischemic heart disease. In contrast to adult stem cells, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the advantage of being pluripotent, which endows them with the ability to differentiate into virtually every cell type. Numerous studies have demonstrated that hESC-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) can improve cardiac function in small and large animal models. In addition, the FDA has approved hESC-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells for patients with acute spinal cord injury and hESC-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells for patients with Stargardt’s macular dystrophy. Hence the conventional controversies and regulatory hurdles related to hESC-based trials are no longer major barriers to the field. In this proposal, we seek to extend and translate the robust pre-clinical data into clinical reality by demonstrating the safety and feasibility of hESC-CM transplantation. We will perform careful IND-enabling research in the first 3 years. Afterwards, our medical teams will initiate a phase 1 clinical trial involving 10 patients with end stage heart failure (ESHF). We will perform direct intramyocardial injection of hESC-CMs in ESHF patients undergoing left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation as a bridge toward orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). After the patients have received matching donor hearts, the native recipient hearts will be explanted. This will provide us an opportunity to carefully assess the fate of these cells and to ensure safety before we can embark on a larger clinical trial in Years 5-10.
Progress Report: 
  • Patients with end-stage heart failure (ESHF) have a 2-year survival rate of 50% with conventional medical therapy. This dismal survival rate is actually significantly worse than patients with AIDS, liver cirrhosis, stroke, and other debilitating diseases. Stem cell therapy may be a promising strategy for inducing myocardial regeneration via paracrine activation, prevention of cardiac apoptosis, and other mechanisms. Several studies have convincingly shown that human embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) and that these cells can be used to effectively improve cardiac function following myocardial infarction (MI). Over the past year, we have assembled a strong multi-disciplinary team and applied for the CIRM Disease Team Therapy proposal.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Heart Disease

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine