Blood Cancer

Coding Dimension ID: 
287
Coding Dimension path name: 
Cancer / Blood

Therapeutic potential of genetically modified human ES cells in an Alzheimer's disease model: Contribution of IGF-1

Funding Type: 
SEED Grant
Grant Number: 
RS1-00228
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$0
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive and irreversible disease of the brain leading to deterioration of mental function and eventual morbidity and death. The major defining characteristic of AD brains is the excessive accumulation of amyloid plaques (composed of clumps of Abeta) outside of nerve cells and tangles (composed of clumps of tau) inside nerve cells. These lesions are toxic to nerve cells and likely explain the progressive degeneration seen in AD brains. Currently available treatments for AD provide only limited symptomatic relief and are unable to prevent, stop, or cure the disease. Even if next generation drugs prove to be more effective, they are unlikely to reverse the disease progression. Thus, it may be necessary to replace dead or dying nerve cells in order to reverse the course of the disease in many AD patients. The long-term objective of this proposal is to use genetically modified human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as an inexhaustible source for replacing lost or damaged nerve cells, supplying the host brain with protection from further damage, and working against the underlying factors that promote amyloid and tangle lesions. Such objective ultimately may lead to a strategy for therapeutic intervention in AD patients who do not respond to available pharmacological treatments. It is well known that mouse embryonic stem cells exhibit the remarkable ability to respond to damaged nerve cells and home in on these degenerative environments in brain. At present, the capacity of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to integrate into the diseased brain such as those with amyloid and tangle lesions is unknown. In this proposal, we will use a mouse model of AD that develops both amyloid plaques and tangles to test the idea that transplantation of ESCs might be beneficial in treating AD. Our hypothesis is that human ESCs possess the inherent capacity to home in and integrate into sites surrounding plaques and tangles, where nerve cell damage is occurring. In addition, we hypothesize that human ESCs genetically modified to produce a protective factor called IGF-1 will further enhance this capability, help host nerve cells from further damage, and block the accumulation of plaques and tangles. It is known that IGF-1 promotes ESCs to become nerve cells, protects nerve cells from damage by Abeta, and decreases the levels of Abeta in brain. Furthermore, IGF-1 levels are reduced in AD, and loss of IGF-1 promotes tangle-like lesions in mice. If the above hypotheses can be even partially demonstrated, the current proposal is expected significantly advance our long-term objective of applying genetically modified human ESCs as a therapeutic technology for AD patients who are refractory to available pharmacological treatments.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an age-related debilitating disease of the brain characterized by progressive deterioration of mental function and accounts for more than 70% of all dementias of the brain. AD inflicts more than 465,000 residents in California alone and places substantial medical, social, psychological, and financial burden on the patients, their families, and social/medical institutions. The per capita cost of caring for an AD patient in California was estimated to be more than $65,000 per year in 1998. It was also projected at the time that the cost of caring for AD patients in California (in 1998 dollars) will be ~$25.9 billion in 2000, ~$47.5 billion in 2020, and ~$75.4 billion in 2040. During the same time period, the number of AD patients in California is projected to rise from ~395,000 in 2000 to ~1.2 million in 2040. At present, no effective treatment is available for AD. First generation drugs can temporarily mask symptoms of the disease but rapidly lose effectiveness during the progression of AD. Even if next generation drugs prove to be more effective, they will only help to slow down the progression of AD but not reverse it. As such, it may be necessary use an alternate therapeutic strategy to replace dead or dying nerve cells, especially in patients that do not respond to available drugs. Human embryonic stem cells have emerged in recent years to hold enormous potential for cell replacement therapy for wide variety of neurological disorders, including AD. As California continues to be at the forefront of new and innovative technologies, the passage of Proposition 71 to fund stem cell research further extends this spirit of innovation. The research proposed in this application attempts to generate genetically modified human embryonic stem cells capable of not only replacing lost nerve cells but also delivering protective factors that prevent further degeneration of existing nerve cells in an animal model of AD. Such kind of technological coupling between stem cell therapy and gene therapy poses therapeutic potential for application in AD where irreversible nerve cell damage cannot be treated with even the best of next generation drugs. If successful, this will also help to offset the enormous social and financial burden of caring for AD patients in California. Technologies and therapeutics derived from stem cell research funded by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) are in part the contractual property of the state of California, and hence its residents. In the event that such intellectual property leads to commercialization or licensing down the line, a portion of the proceeds are contracted to enter the California state general fund, ensuring that all California residents benefit from potential successes of this research.
Progress Report: 
  • SEED Grant Research Summary
  • Compelling studies suggest that cancer stem cells (CSC) arise from primitive self-renewing progenitor cells. Although many cancer therapies target rapidly dividing cells, CSC may be quiescent i.e. asleep resulting in therapeutic resistance. Recently, we demonstrated that CSC drive progression of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a subject of many landmark cancer research discoveries, to a therapeutically recalcitrant myeloid blast crisis (BC) phase. CML CSC share cell surface markers with granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMP) and have amplified expression of the CML fusion gene, BCR-ABL. In addition, they aberrantly gain self-renewal capacity, in part, as a result Wnt/β-catenin activation. Because human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have robust regenerative capacity and can provide a potentially limitless source of tissue specific progenitor cells in vitro, they represent an ideal model system for generating and characterizing human CSC. The main goals of this research were to generate CSC from hESC to provide an experimentally amenable platform to expedite the development of sensitive diagnostics that predict progression and combined modality anti-CSC therapy.
  • To this end, we tested whether BCR-ABL expression in hESC is sufficient to induce changes characteristic of CML stem cells. Unlike mouse ESC, introduction of a novel lentiviral BCR-ABL vector into hESC did not drive myeloid differentiation nor did it induce stromal independence in vitro underscoring key differences between mouse and human hESC and the importance of in vivo models. Notably, Hues16 cells had a higher propensity to differentiate into CD34+ cells than other hESC lines particularly in AGM co-cultures and thus, were used in subsequent in vivo experiments. Moreover, this SEED grant funded Yosuke Minami in Professor Jean Wang’s lab to create a unique CML blast crisis mouse model typified by GMP expansion and resistance to a BCR-ABL inhibitor, imatinib (Minami et al, PNAS 2008;105:17967-72). In addition, a bioluminescent humanized model of blast crisis CML was created based on transplantation of GMP from patient blood into immune deficient mice (RAG2-/-gc-/-). Cells were tagged with firefly luciferase that emits a bioluminescent signal so that leukemic transplantation efficiency could be tracked in vivo (IVIS). As few as 1,000 human blast crisis CML GMP could transplant leukemia in immune deficient mice thereby providing an important model for studying the molecular events that contribute to leukemic transformation (Abrahamsson et al, PNAS 2009;106:3925-9).
  • In the second aim, we hypothesized that BCR-ABL is sufficient for generating CML from self-renewing stem cells. In these studies, Hues16 cells differentiated into CD34+ cells were lentivirally transduced with BCR-ABL leading to sustained BCR-ABL engraftment in 50% of transplanted mice. Chronic phase CD34+ cells derived from CML blood were less efficient at sustaining CML engraftment (7%) suggesting that hESC derived CD34+ cells have higher self-renewal potential and are similar to advanced phase CML progenitors.
  • Thirdly, we hypothesized that BCR-ABL was necessary but not sufficient for progression to blast crisis. Introduction of lentiviral activated beta-catenin or shRNA to GSK3beta, together with BCR-ABL did not enhance BCR-ABL engraftment compared with BCR-ABL transduction of hESC alone. These studies suggested that hESC may already have sufficient self-renewal capacity to sustain the malignant CML clone and are molecularly comparable to advanced CML progenitors that behave like CSC. In addition, through extensive cDNA sequencing of human blast crisis CML progenitors, we found that 57% of samples harbored a misspliced form of GSK3beta that promoted tumor production and could serve as a novel prognostic marker in CML clinical trials (Abrahamsson et al, PNAS 2009;106:3925-9).
  • In the final aim, we hypothesized that CML CSC are not eliminated by BCR-ABL inhibitors alone and that combined modality therapy will be required. In collaborative research involving in vitro analysis of imatinib resistant CML progenitors and more recently in a humanized mouse model of blast crisis CML, we found that dasatinib, a potent BCR-ABL inhibitor, is necessary but not sufficient for CSC eradication. Discovery of a GSK3beta deregulation, a negative regulator of both beta-catenin and sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathways (Zhang et al, Nature 2009), led us to disover that Shh combined with BCR-ABL inhibition abrogated CSC driven tumor formation (manuscript in preparation) providing the impetus for an upcoming Pfizer sponsored Shh inhibitor clinical trial for refractory hematologic malignancies.

Epigenetic regulation of AAVS1

Funding Type: 
SEED Grant
Grant Number: 
RS1-00228
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$0
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
Development and differentiation is regulated by spatial and temporal regulation of genes. Genes in the nucleus are found associated with proteins and this is called chromatin, which regulates genes. Genes in stem cells are also regulated by chromatin and the structure of chromatin undergoes changes during differentiation. Understanding the sequence of events that occur in specific chromatin domains during stem cell self-renewal and differentiation becomes vital before we can begin to use these in regenerative medicine. Genetically modifying stem cells may be necessary prior to their use in therapy. The non-pathogenic virus AAV is employed as a vector in numerous gene therapy trials and holds promise for use in modifying stem cells. This virus establishes a latent infection by integrating into a specific region of the human genome called AAVS1. This is in contrast to other viruses used in gene therapy that randomly insert into the genome and thus can be mutagenic. We propose to investigate the chromatin structure at AAVS1 so that AAV based vectors can be used optimally in regenerative medicine. This proposal will improve our toolkit for modifying stem cells using gene therapy. One way to reverse the effects of dysfunctional genes is to deliver a corrected copy to the affected individual. By virtue of their ability to propagate indefinitely, stem cells offer an unlimited supply of healthy genes but undifferentiated stem cells transplanted into patients give rise to problems. These problems can potentially be circumvented by genetically manipulating stem cells in vitro to direct their differentiation into the lineage of choice prior to transplantation but will necessitate integrating transgenes into these cells. The proposed experiments will allow us to better genetically modify stem cells. The experiments outlined in this proposal will characterize the chromatin domains around the AAVS1 region in depth. We will determine how the AAVS1 genomic locus changes with respect to its chromatin structure as stem cells undergo differentiation into specific lineages. Furthermore, we will establish the chromatin determinants that (i) promote the stable integration of AAV into a specific region of the genome and (ii) allow stable expression of transgenes in stem cells. As our long-term goal we will study the changes that occur in the chromatin structure of the AAVS1 region in stem cells expressing an AAV-mediated transgene that induces these cells to differentiate along a specific lineage. These studies will enable the development of vectors for the expression of specific transgenes in stem cells that will direct their differentiation into specific cell types. Such a system could then be exploited to generate large cell banks with diverse histocompatibilities for use in patients with hereditary disorders.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This proposal seeks to combine the potential of two of the most promising approaches in modern medicine: stem cell and gene therapy. Over 1800 genes have been determined to cause hereditary disorders and the most obvious way to reverse the effects of such dysfunctional genes is to deliver a corrected copy to the affected individual. By virtue of their ability to propagate indefinitely, stem cells offer an unlimited supply of healthy genes. However, when undifferentiated embryonic stem cells are transplanted into the patient they have the potential to form teratomas while adult stem cells can potentially give rise to tissues that are not desirable at the site of transplantation. These problems can potentially be circumvented by genetically manipulating stem cells in vitro to direct and control their differentiation into the lineage of choice prior to transplantation. In the future one can envision CA-based large therapeutic cell bank repositories of different lineages and immune characteristics that would enable physicians to find immunologically compatible cells for corrective cell therapy. Results from experiments in this proposal will allow the stable expression of proteins and growth factors that can direct stem cell differentiation without being subjected to position effects resulting from random integrations and can therefore be utilized for generating cell banks. A second application for the proposed research is in gene transfer therapy where stem cells derived from the patient are corrected for the defective gene, expanded, characterized and allowed to differentiate prior to re-transplantation into that patient thus avoiding immune rejection. Although this approach requires heavy logistics and might be limited to small numbers of patients, therapies such as these could be developed from the proposed research and will have the advantage that the integrated genes will not be subject to variations in expression by gene silencing and additionally will avoid the problems of histocompatibility mismatches and immune rejection. Knowledge from this research will also spur growth in new biotechnology firms to develop gene delivery vectors in stem cells thus offering a direct advantage to the state in terms of revenue and employment opportunities. This research will also put the state of California at the forefront of stem cell technology along with other nations.
Progress Report: 
  • SEED Grant Research Summary
  • Compelling studies suggest that cancer stem cells (CSC) arise from primitive self-renewing progenitor cells. Although many cancer therapies target rapidly dividing cells, CSC may be quiescent i.e. asleep resulting in therapeutic resistance. Recently, we demonstrated that CSC drive progression of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a subject of many landmark cancer research discoveries, to a therapeutically recalcitrant myeloid blast crisis (BC) phase. CML CSC share cell surface markers with granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMP) and have amplified expression of the CML fusion gene, BCR-ABL. In addition, they aberrantly gain self-renewal capacity, in part, as a result Wnt/β-catenin activation. Because human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have robust regenerative capacity and can provide a potentially limitless source of tissue specific progenitor cells in vitro, they represent an ideal model system for generating and characterizing human CSC. The main goals of this research were to generate CSC from hESC to provide an experimentally amenable platform to expedite the development of sensitive diagnostics that predict progression and combined modality anti-CSC therapy.
  • To this end, we tested whether BCR-ABL expression in hESC is sufficient to induce changes characteristic of CML stem cells. Unlike mouse ESC, introduction of a novel lentiviral BCR-ABL vector into hESC did not drive myeloid differentiation nor did it induce stromal independence in vitro underscoring key differences between mouse and human hESC and the importance of in vivo models. Notably, Hues16 cells had a higher propensity to differentiate into CD34+ cells than other hESC lines particularly in AGM co-cultures and thus, were used in subsequent in vivo experiments. Moreover, this SEED grant funded Yosuke Minami in Professor Jean Wang’s lab to create a unique CML blast crisis mouse model typified by GMP expansion and resistance to a BCR-ABL inhibitor, imatinib (Minami et al, PNAS 2008;105:17967-72). In addition, a bioluminescent humanized model of blast crisis CML was created based on transplantation of GMP from patient blood into immune deficient mice (RAG2-/-gc-/-). Cells were tagged with firefly luciferase that emits a bioluminescent signal so that leukemic transplantation efficiency could be tracked in vivo (IVIS). As few as 1,000 human blast crisis CML GMP could transplant leukemia in immune deficient mice thereby providing an important model for studying the molecular events that contribute to leukemic transformation (Abrahamsson et al, PNAS 2009;106:3925-9).
  • In the second aim, we hypothesized that BCR-ABL is sufficient for generating CML from self-renewing stem cells. In these studies, Hues16 cells differentiated into CD34+ cells were lentivirally transduced with BCR-ABL leading to sustained BCR-ABL engraftment in 50% of transplanted mice. Chronic phase CD34+ cells derived from CML blood were less efficient at sustaining CML engraftment (7%) suggesting that hESC derived CD34+ cells have higher self-renewal potential and are similar to advanced phase CML progenitors.
  • Thirdly, we hypothesized that BCR-ABL was necessary but not sufficient for progression to blast crisis. Introduction of lentiviral activated beta-catenin or shRNA to GSK3beta, together with BCR-ABL did not enhance BCR-ABL engraftment compared with BCR-ABL transduction of hESC alone. These studies suggested that hESC may already have sufficient self-renewal capacity to sustain the malignant CML clone and are molecularly comparable to advanced CML progenitors that behave like CSC. In addition, through extensive cDNA sequencing of human blast crisis CML progenitors, we found that 57% of samples harbored a misspliced form of GSK3beta that promoted tumor production and could serve as a novel prognostic marker in CML clinical trials (Abrahamsson et al, PNAS 2009;106:3925-9).
  • In the final aim, we hypothesized that CML CSC are not eliminated by BCR-ABL inhibitors alone and that combined modality therapy will be required. In collaborative research involving in vitro analysis of imatinib resistant CML progenitors and more recently in a humanized mouse model of blast crisis CML, we found that dasatinib, a potent BCR-ABL inhibitor, is necessary but not sufficient for CSC eradication. Discovery of a GSK3beta deregulation, a negative regulator of both beta-catenin and sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathways (Zhang et al, Nature 2009), led us to disover that Shh combined with BCR-ABL inhibition abrogated CSC driven tumor formation (manuscript in preparation) providing the impetus for an upcoming Pfizer sponsored Shh inhibitor clinical trial for refractory hematologic malignancies.

Role of Notch signaling in human embryonic stem cell differentiation to neuronal cell fates

Funding Type: 
SEED Grant
Grant Number: 
RS1-00228
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$0
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
Human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) are capable of giving rise to a variety of differentiated human cell types that in principle could be used therapeutically to treat tissue damage that arises in human disease. The promise of HESCs is still quite limited because of technical limitations in our ability to propagate these cells in culture, while retaining their potency to become many different types of cells, and to guide them to become the right type of cell needed for clinical use. The proposed work will develop the tools to address these issues, by focusing on the Notch signaling pathway. Studies of the Notch pathway in model organisms like mice has shown that it plays a pivotal role in regulating the development of embryonic cells, by activating critical target genes that maintain cells in a proliferative, undifferentiated state. The proposed experiments will examine the activity of the Notch pathway in HESCs, as they are experimentally induced to form the precursors to nerve cells. The long-term goal of this work is to develop the information and tools needed to manipulate HESCs in culture via the Notch pathway, allowing one to better control their proliferation and differentiation into defined cell types.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The goal of the proposed research is to develop tools that can be used to manipulate human embryonic stem cells, thus allowing them to be more effectively used as therapeutic agents. The process we are studying will help define optimal procedures to encourage human embryonic stem cells to produce homogeneous populations of specific neural cell types that are needed to replace damaged neural tissues for patients with Parkinson’s and other neural diseases.
Progress Report: 
  • SEED Grant Research Summary
  • Compelling studies suggest that cancer stem cells (CSC) arise from primitive self-renewing progenitor cells. Although many cancer therapies target rapidly dividing cells, CSC may be quiescent i.e. asleep resulting in therapeutic resistance. Recently, we demonstrated that CSC drive progression of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a subject of many landmark cancer research discoveries, to a therapeutically recalcitrant myeloid blast crisis (BC) phase. CML CSC share cell surface markers with granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMP) and have amplified expression of the CML fusion gene, BCR-ABL. In addition, they aberrantly gain self-renewal capacity, in part, as a result Wnt/β-catenin activation. Because human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have robust regenerative capacity and can provide a potentially limitless source of tissue specific progenitor cells in vitro, they represent an ideal model system for generating and characterizing human CSC. The main goals of this research were to generate CSC from hESC to provide an experimentally amenable platform to expedite the development of sensitive diagnostics that predict progression and combined modality anti-CSC therapy.
  • To this end, we tested whether BCR-ABL expression in hESC is sufficient to induce changes characteristic of CML stem cells. Unlike mouse ESC, introduction of a novel lentiviral BCR-ABL vector into hESC did not drive myeloid differentiation nor did it induce stromal independence in vitro underscoring key differences between mouse and human hESC and the importance of in vivo models. Notably, Hues16 cells had a higher propensity to differentiate into CD34+ cells than other hESC lines particularly in AGM co-cultures and thus, were used in subsequent in vivo experiments. Moreover, this SEED grant funded Yosuke Minami in Professor Jean Wang’s lab to create a unique CML blast crisis mouse model typified by GMP expansion and resistance to a BCR-ABL inhibitor, imatinib (Minami et al, PNAS 2008;105:17967-72). In addition, a bioluminescent humanized model of blast crisis CML was created based on transplantation of GMP from patient blood into immune deficient mice (RAG2-/-gc-/-). Cells were tagged with firefly luciferase that emits a bioluminescent signal so that leukemic transplantation efficiency could be tracked in vivo (IVIS). As few as 1,000 human blast crisis CML GMP could transplant leukemia in immune deficient mice thereby providing an important model for studying the molecular events that contribute to leukemic transformation (Abrahamsson et al, PNAS 2009;106:3925-9).
  • In the second aim, we hypothesized that BCR-ABL is sufficient for generating CML from self-renewing stem cells. In these studies, Hues16 cells differentiated into CD34+ cells were lentivirally transduced with BCR-ABL leading to sustained BCR-ABL engraftment in 50% of transplanted mice. Chronic phase CD34+ cells derived from CML blood were less efficient at sustaining CML engraftment (7%) suggesting that hESC derived CD34+ cells have higher self-renewal potential and are similar to advanced phase CML progenitors.
  • Thirdly, we hypothesized that BCR-ABL was necessary but not sufficient for progression to blast crisis. Introduction of lentiviral activated beta-catenin or shRNA to GSK3beta, together with BCR-ABL did not enhance BCR-ABL engraftment compared with BCR-ABL transduction of hESC alone. These studies suggested that hESC may already have sufficient self-renewal capacity to sustain the malignant CML clone and are molecularly comparable to advanced CML progenitors that behave like CSC. In addition, through extensive cDNA sequencing of human blast crisis CML progenitors, we found that 57% of samples harbored a misspliced form of GSK3beta that promoted tumor production and could serve as a novel prognostic marker in CML clinical trials (Abrahamsson et al, PNAS 2009;106:3925-9).
  • In the final aim, we hypothesized that CML CSC are not eliminated by BCR-ABL inhibitors alone and that combined modality therapy will be required. In collaborative research involving in vitro analysis of imatinib resistant CML progenitors and more recently in a humanized mouse model of blast crisis CML, we found that dasatinib, a potent BCR-ABL inhibitor, is necessary but not sufficient for CSC eradication. Discovery of a GSK3beta deregulation, a negative regulator of both beta-catenin and sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathways (Zhang et al, Nature 2009), led us to disover that Shh combined with BCR-ABL inhibition abrogated CSC driven tumor formation (manuscript in preparation) providing the impetus for an upcoming Pfizer sponsored Shh inhibitor clinical trial for refractory hematologic malignancies.

Brain Aging and hESC-derived Neural Stem Cell Transplantation

Funding Type: 
SEED Grant
Grant Number: 
RS1-00228
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$0
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
Aging is an important risk factor for human diseases. In addition to cognitive decline in the elderly, brain aging also increases the risk for neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and stroke, which are major causes of disability and mortality in the elderly. Current therapeutic approaches typically fail to treat the underlying cause of these disorders. The potential capacity of human neural stem cells to replace cells and tissues damaged due to aging and age-realted diseases is, therefore, of great importance. Activation or transplantation of these cells has already shown promise in animal models of these disorders. However, little is known about how aging affects host receptivity to hESC-derived cell transplants, or about the proliferation, survival, differentiation, migration and functionality of the donor cells. This is partly because in vivo studies of aged-related neurological diseases have relied almost universally on experimental models using young adult animals.We hypothesize that the ability of hESC-derived transplants to proliferate, survive, differentiate, migrate and function may be compromised in the aged brain, requiring that new strategies be devised to overcome this deficiency. The experiments we propose are designed to increase our understanding of how the age of the recipient alters the ability of transplanted neural stem cells to differentiate into mature, functional neurons and integrate into local neuronal circuits. Our first Specific Aim will examine these issues using immunocytochemistry and electrophysiological methods, after transplanting neural stem cells into young adult, middle aged and aged rats. In addition, because brain aging produces progressive changes in learning and memory, a critical area to examine is whether neural stem cell therapy can produce functional improvement in learning and memory deficits in aged rats. Our second Specific Aim will address this question by using a battery of behavioral tests to assess the ability of transplanted neural stem cells to reverse age-related losses of cognitive function. The use of neural stem cells to repair age-related neurological diseases will require an increased understanding of stem cell biology, the environment of the aged tissue, and the interaction between the two, which this proposed work will focus on. If the aims of the application are achieved, significant advances will be made in establishing a new paradigm of brain aging and the biological behaviors of transplanted neural stem cells, and substantial progress will be made in developing basic science knowledge that can be translated fairly rapidly into clinical treatment of aged-related neurological diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Aging is destined to become a serious public health problem for California over the next several decades. California’s elderly population is expected to grow more than twice as fast as the total population from 1990 to 2020, and will reach 12.5 million by 2040. One in five Californians will be 60 years of age or older beginning in 2010. Consequently, age-related diseases, including neurological diseases, will dramatically increased in parallel, presenting enormous social and economic challenges. Determining whether transplanted human neural stem cells can differentiate into functional neurons in the aging brain, and thereby slow or prevent cognitive decline in the aged, could have great social and economic impact in our state.
Progress Report: 
  • SEED Grant Research Summary
  • Compelling studies suggest that cancer stem cells (CSC) arise from primitive self-renewing progenitor cells. Although many cancer therapies target rapidly dividing cells, CSC may be quiescent i.e. asleep resulting in therapeutic resistance. Recently, we demonstrated that CSC drive progression of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a subject of many landmark cancer research discoveries, to a therapeutically recalcitrant myeloid blast crisis (BC) phase. CML CSC share cell surface markers with granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMP) and have amplified expression of the CML fusion gene, BCR-ABL. In addition, they aberrantly gain self-renewal capacity, in part, as a result Wnt/β-catenin activation. Because human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have robust regenerative capacity and can provide a potentially limitless source of tissue specific progenitor cells in vitro, they represent an ideal model system for generating and characterizing human CSC. The main goals of this research were to generate CSC from hESC to provide an experimentally amenable platform to expedite the development of sensitive diagnostics that predict progression and combined modality anti-CSC therapy.
  • To this end, we tested whether BCR-ABL expression in hESC is sufficient to induce changes characteristic of CML stem cells. Unlike mouse ESC, introduction of a novel lentiviral BCR-ABL vector into hESC did not drive myeloid differentiation nor did it induce stromal independence in vitro underscoring key differences between mouse and human hESC and the importance of in vivo models. Notably, Hues16 cells had a higher propensity to differentiate into CD34+ cells than other hESC lines particularly in AGM co-cultures and thus, were used in subsequent in vivo experiments. Moreover, this SEED grant funded Yosuke Minami in Professor Jean Wang’s lab to create a unique CML blast crisis mouse model typified by GMP expansion and resistance to a BCR-ABL inhibitor, imatinib (Minami et al, PNAS 2008;105:17967-72). In addition, a bioluminescent humanized model of blast crisis CML was created based on transplantation of GMP from patient blood into immune deficient mice (RAG2-/-gc-/-). Cells were tagged with firefly luciferase that emits a bioluminescent signal so that leukemic transplantation efficiency could be tracked in vivo (IVIS). As few as 1,000 human blast crisis CML GMP could transplant leukemia in immune deficient mice thereby providing an important model for studying the molecular events that contribute to leukemic transformation (Abrahamsson et al, PNAS 2009;106:3925-9).
  • In the second aim, we hypothesized that BCR-ABL is sufficient for generating CML from self-renewing stem cells. In these studies, Hues16 cells differentiated into CD34+ cells were lentivirally transduced with BCR-ABL leading to sustained BCR-ABL engraftment in 50% of transplanted mice. Chronic phase CD34+ cells derived from CML blood were less efficient at sustaining CML engraftment (7%) suggesting that hESC derived CD34+ cells have higher self-renewal potential and are similar to advanced phase CML progenitors.
  • Thirdly, we hypothesized that BCR-ABL was necessary but not sufficient for progression to blast crisis. Introduction of lentiviral activated beta-catenin or shRNA to GSK3beta, together with BCR-ABL did not enhance BCR-ABL engraftment compared with BCR-ABL transduction of hESC alone. These studies suggested that hESC may already have sufficient self-renewal capacity to sustain the malignant CML clone and are molecularly comparable to advanced CML progenitors that behave like CSC. In addition, through extensive cDNA sequencing of human blast crisis CML progenitors, we found that 57% of samples harbored a misspliced form of GSK3beta that promoted tumor production and could serve as a novel prognostic marker in CML clinical trials (Abrahamsson et al, PNAS 2009;106:3925-9).
  • In the final aim, we hypothesized that CML CSC are not eliminated by BCR-ABL inhibitors alone and that combined modality therapy will be required. In collaborative research involving in vitro analysis of imatinib resistant CML progenitors and more recently in a humanized mouse model of blast crisis CML, we found that dasatinib, a potent BCR-ABL inhibitor, is necessary but not sufficient for CSC eradication. Discovery of a GSK3beta deregulation, a negative regulator of both beta-catenin and sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathways (Zhang et al, Nature 2009), led us to disover that Shh combined with BCR-ABL inhibition abrogated CSC driven tumor formation (manuscript in preparation) providing the impetus for an upcoming Pfizer sponsored Shh inhibitor clinical trial for refractory hematologic malignancies.

Developing chicken embryos as an experimental microenvironment for human embryonic stem cells

Funding Type: 
SEED Grant
Grant Number: 
RS1-00228
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$0
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
It is expected that research funded by the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine will result in the development of many new human embryonic stem cells. The properties of these cell lines will have to be verified. One of the main attributes of embryonic stem cells is their capacity to differentiate toward an unlimited number of cell fates. This is what will make them a powerful tool in future regenerative medicine. Therefore, we need new methods capable of quickly evaluating the response of many cell lines to many different environments. In this proposal, we will develop and test a new test bed to evaluate the capabilities of potential human embryonic stem cells: the chicken embryo. Since chicken embryos develop outside the body in an egg, they are highly accessible to experimental manipulations. This enables us both to introduce reagents (ie., human embryonic stem cells) and to visualize the response of those reagents to their local environments as they happen. We propose to introduce human embryonic stem cells to six different organ systems during several stages of development. This will test the ability of these cells to respond to a large number of different environmental stimuli. Since different embryonic cell lines may have different capacities, we will test the abilities of seven different human embryonic stem cells. We will compare their response with that of partially differentiated cells that should have more limited differentiation capabilities. Transplanted cells will be fluorescently tagged so their migration can be traced by fluorescence microscopy. Antibodies and probes of molecular expression will be used to assess the response of these cell lines to different environments. Their origin (human or chicken) can also be confirmed with these methods using different antibodies and probes. This will help us to develop a set of formal criteria that to assess the response capability of hESC as they progressively become more differentiated. To further understand molecular aspects of the cellular response, we will begin to characterize changes in molecular expression that take place as cells progress toward specific cell fates. This profile will enable us to begin to understand molecular factors which regulate cellular differentiation, so they can be harnessed for effective future regenerative medical applications. This last goal will serve to show the power of this technology, but will have to await a later stage of funding to be completed.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Human embryonic stem cells offer tremendous potential toward significant advances in the new age of regenerative medicine. These cells can be induced to differentiate along many different cell fates, providing the promise of tissue and/or organ replacement or supplementation. This approach offers great hope toward improving health care especially where tissues are damaged due to disease or injury. Ultimately, this approach could reduce health care costs and increase the well being of the general population. We expect that many new embryonic stem cell lines will be derived with support from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. We would not be surprised if the ability of these putative stem cells to differentiate toward specific cell fates differed from cell line to cell line. Additionally, some cell lines may lose their differentiative capacity as they are kept in in vitro culture conditions. Our research proposal aims to provide an easy and effective assay to test the pluripotentiality of these new putative human embryonic stem cell lines. In order for these cell lines to live up to their full potential and be useful in curing human diseases, we must understand their pluripotential properties. To date, assays of pluripotentiality have depended on 1) in vitro assays with limits in ascertaining the true developmental potential and 2) transplantation to mouse embryos which do not facilitate the high throughput analysis, essential to screen the myriad of generated cell lines. The latter assay also involves causing pain in a sentient being (the mother). Chicken embryos develop in an egg, outside of the body. Hence it is easily accessible to experimentation including the delivery and observation of putative embryonic stem cells. The chicken embryo is a classic model of development and has been very well documented through years of research. It offers a myriad of developmental microenvironments which can be utilized to test the responsiveness of these new cell lines. This research would contribute to the progress of stem cell research which ultimately could improve health care for everyone, worldwide. Since California is one of the first states to implement support for human embryonic stem cell research, our findings could also contribute to major economic advantages to the citizens of the state.
Progress Report: 
  • SEED Grant Research Summary
  • Compelling studies suggest that cancer stem cells (CSC) arise from primitive self-renewing progenitor cells. Although many cancer therapies target rapidly dividing cells, CSC may be quiescent i.e. asleep resulting in therapeutic resistance. Recently, we demonstrated that CSC drive progression of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a subject of many landmark cancer research discoveries, to a therapeutically recalcitrant myeloid blast crisis (BC) phase. CML CSC share cell surface markers with granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMP) and have amplified expression of the CML fusion gene, BCR-ABL. In addition, they aberrantly gain self-renewal capacity, in part, as a result Wnt/β-catenin activation. Because human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have robust regenerative capacity and can provide a potentially limitless source of tissue specific progenitor cells in vitro, they represent an ideal model system for generating and characterizing human CSC. The main goals of this research were to generate CSC from hESC to provide an experimentally amenable platform to expedite the development of sensitive diagnostics that predict progression and combined modality anti-CSC therapy.
  • To this end, we tested whether BCR-ABL expression in hESC is sufficient to induce changes characteristic of CML stem cells. Unlike mouse ESC, introduction of a novel lentiviral BCR-ABL vector into hESC did not drive myeloid differentiation nor did it induce stromal independence in vitro underscoring key differences between mouse and human hESC and the importance of in vivo models. Notably, Hues16 cells had a higher propensity to differentiate into CD34+ cells than other hESC lines particularly in AGM co-cultures and thus, were used in subsequent in vivo experiments. Moreover, this SEED grant funded Yosuke Minami in Professor Jean Wang’s lab to create a unique CML blast crisis mouse model typified by GMP expansion and resistance to a BCR-ABL inhibitor, imatinib (Minami et al, PNAS 2008;105:17967-72). In addition, a bioluminescent humanized model of blast crisis CML was created based on transplantation of GMP from patient blood into immune deficient mice (RAG2-/-gc-/-). Cells were tagged with firefly luciferase that emits a bioluminescent signal so that leukemic transplantation efficiency could be tracked in vivo (IVIS). As few as 1,000 human blast crisis CML GMP could transplant leukemia in immune deficient mice thereby providing an important model for studying the molecular events that contribute to leukemic transformation (Abrahamsson et al, PNAS 2009;106:3925-9).
  • In the second aim, we hypothesized that BCR-ABL is sufficient for generating CML from self-renewing stem cells. In these studies, Hues16 cells differentiated into CD34+ cells were lentivirally transduced with BCR-ABL leading to sustained BCR-ABL engraftment in 50% of transplanted mice. Chronic phase CD34+ cells derived from CML blood were less efficient at sustaining CML engraftment (7%) suggesting that hESC derived CD34+ cells have higher self-renewal potential and are similar to advanced phase CML progenitors.
  • Thirdly, we hypothesized that BCR-ABL was necessary but not sufficient for progression to blast crisis. Introduction of lentiviral activated beta-catenin or shRNA to GSK3beta, together with BCR-ABL did not enhance BCR-ABL engraftment compared with BCR-ABL transduction of hESC alone. These studies suggested that hESC may already have sufficient self-renewal capacity to sustain the malignant CML clone and are molecularly comparable to advanced CML progenitors that behave like CSC. In addition, through extensive cDNA sequencing of human blast crisis CML progenitors, we found that 57% of samples harbored a misspliced form of GSK3beta that promoted tumor production and could serve as a novel prognostic marker in CML clinical trials (Abrahamsson et al, PNAS 2009;106:3925-9).
  • In the final aim, we hypothesized that CML CSC are not eliminated by BCR-ABL inhibitors alone and that combined modality therapy will be required. In collaborative research involving in vitro analysis of imatinib resistant CML progenitors and more recently in a humanized mouse model of blast crisis CML, we found that dasatinib, a potent BCR-ABL inhibitor, is necessary but not sufficient for CSC eradication. Discovery of a GSK3beta deregulation, a negative regulator of both beta-catenin and sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathways (Zhang et al, Nature 2009), led us to disover that Shh combined with BCR-ABL inhibition abrogated CSC driven tumor formation (manuscript in preparation) providing the impetus for an upcoming Pfizer sponsored Shh inhibitor clinical trial for refractory hematologic malignancies.

Stem Cell-Based Targeted Immune Therapy for Cancer

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Research I
Grant Number: 
DR1-01485
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$0
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
Science has made great progress in the treatment of certain cancers with targeted and combination therapies, yet prolonged remissions or cures are rare because most cancer therapies only inhibit cell growth and/or reduce such growth but do not stop the cancer. The study investigators propose to develop two Investigational New Drug (IND) applications within the grant period for the genetic modification of hematopoietic (blood) stem cells (HSC) from patients with advanced forms of an aggressive skin cancer (malignant melanoma) to genetically redirect the patient’s immune response to specifically attack the cancer. Evaluation of effectiveness and immune response during treatment will use imaging with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans. The HSC treatment approach has been validated in extensive studies in the laboratory. The investigators of this grant have recently initiated a clinical trial where adult immune cells obtained from blood are genetically modified to become specific killer cells for melanoma. These cells are administered back to patients. The early data from this study is encouraging in terms of the ability to generate these cells, safely administer them to patients leading to beneficial early clinical effects. However, the adult immune cells genetically redirected to cancer cells slowly decrease over time because they do not have the ability to self-renew. The advantage of the proposed HSC method over adult blood cells is that the genetically modified HSC will continuously generate melanoma-targeted immune killer cells, providing prolonged protection against the cancer. The 1st IND filing (year 2/quarter 2) will use the modified HSC in end-stage melanoma patients. By the end of year 4, we will expand our efforts to a 2nd IND for a new engineered HSC clinical trial that will increase the specificity of the HSC to other cancers. The therapeutic principles and procedures we develop will be applicable to a wide range of cancers and transferrable to other centers that perform bone marrow and HSC transplants. The aggressive milestone driven IND timeline is based on our: 1) Research that led to the selection and development of a blood cell gene for clinical use in collaboration with the leading experts in the field 2) Our wealth of investigator initiated cell based clinical research and our Human Gene Medicine Program 3) Experience receiving a combined 15 investigator initiated INDs for research with 157 patients in Phase I and II trials 4) Ability to leverage significant institutional resources of on-going HSC laboratory and clinical research and co-support with over $1M of non-CIRM funds to pursue the proposed research goals, including the resulting clinical trial
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Cancer is the leading cause of death in the US and melanoma incidence is increasing the fastest (~69K new cases/year). Treatment of metastatic melanoma is an unmet local and national medical need (~9K deaths/year) striking adults in their prime (30-60 years old). Melanoma is the second greatest cancer cause of lost productive years given its incidence early in life and its high mortality once it metastasizes. The problem is severe in California in large populations with skin types sensitive to the increased exposure of ultraviolet light. Most frequently seen in young urban Caucasians, melanoma also strikes other ethnicities with steady increases of acral melanoma in Latinos and African-Americans over the past decades. Although great progress has been made in the treatment of certain leukemias and lymphomas with targeted and combination therapies, few options exist for the definitive treatment of late stage solid tumors. When cancers like lung, breast, prostate, pancreas, and melanoma metastasize beyond surgical boundaries, prolonged remissions or cures are rare and most cancer therapies only inhibit cell growth and/or reduce such growth but do not stop the cancer. Our proposal which contains 2 INDs for the genetic modification of the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for the immunotherapy of end-stage melanoma allowing sustained production of cancer-reactive blood cells, has the potential to address a significant and serious unmet clinical need for the treatment of melanoma and other cancers, increase patient survival and productivity, and decrease cancer related health care costs. The advantage of the proposed HSC methodology over our current work with peripheral blood is that genetically modified stem cells in the patient’s body will continuously generate melanoma-targeted blood cells providing prolonged protection against the cancer. During the grant period we will also develop and produce a GMP quality second IND vector expressing a T cell receptor for NY-ESO, an antigen expressed by 10-30% of all cancers, thereby broadening the applicability of this approach. The therapeutic principles and procedures developed here will be applicable to a wide range of cancers. GMP reagents and clinical protocols developed by our team will be transferrable to other centers where bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation procedures are done. Our institution, with its college and multiple professional schools, receives over $900M in extramural research support with a major economic impact throughout the region. The proposal will build upon a strong foundation of basic and clinical research and further solidify on-going institutional collaborations that will further link the activities of four premier research institutions.
Progress Report: 
  • Our program is focused on producing new therapeutic candidates to prolong remission and potentially cure highly lethal cancers where patients have few alternative treatment options. We have selected Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) as the initial clinical indication for evaluating our novel therapeutics, but anticipate a full development program encompassing many other types of solid tumor cancers.
  • Our strategy is to develop an antibody that binds to and eliminates the cancer-forming stem cells in leukemia and other solid tumors. While current cancer treatments (e.g. surgery, chemotherapy, radiation) will frequently get rid of the bulk of the tumor, they rarely touch the tiny number of cancer stem cells that actually re-generate the masses of cancer cells that have been eliminated. When the latter occurs, the patient is described as having a relapse, leading to a disease recurrence with poor prognosis. Our strategy is to eliminate the small number of cancer-regenerating stem cells by targeting cell membrane proteins expressed by these cells.
  • We have discovered that many cancer cells coat themselves with a protein called CD47 that prevents them from being eaten and disposed of by the patient’s blood cells. In this context, CD47 can be considered a ‘don’t eat me’ signal that protects the cancer cells from being phagocytosed i.e. ‘eaten’. The antibody we are developing binds to and covers the ‘don’t eat me’ CD47 protein, so that the patient’s blood cells are now able to ‘eat’ the cancer cells by standard physiological responses, and eliminate them from the body.
  • Developing an antibody such as this for use in humans requires many steps to evaluate it is safe, while at the same ensuring it targets and eliminates the cancer forming stem cells. The antibody must also ‘look’ like a human antibody, or else the patient will ‘see’ it as a foreign protein and reject it. To achieve these criteria, we have made humanized antibodies that bind to human CD47. We have shown that the antibodies eliminate cancer cells in two ways: (i) blood cells from healthy humans rapidly “ate” and killed leukemia cells collected from separate cancer patients when the anti-human CD47 antibody was added to a mixture of both cell types in a research laboratory test tube; (ii) the anti-human CD47 antibody eliminates human leukemia cells collected from patients, then transferred into special immunodeficient mice which are unable to eliminate the human tumor cells themselves. In these experiments, the treated mice remained free of the human leukemia cells for many weeks post-treatment, and could be regarded as being cured of malignancy.
  • To show the antibodies were safe, we administered to regular mice large amounts of a comparable anti-mouse CD47 antibody on a daily basis for a period of many months. No adverse effects were noted. Unfortunately our antibody to human CD47 did not bind to mouse CD47, so it’s safety could not be evaluated directly in mice. Since the anti-human CD47 antibody does bind to non-human primate CD47, safety studies for our candidate therapeutic need to be conducted in non-human primates. These studies have been initiated and are in progress. Following administration of the anti-human CD47 antibodies, the non-human primates will be monitored for clinical blood pathology, which, as in humans, provides information about major organ function as well as blood cell function in these animals.
  • The next step after identifying an antibody with strong anti-cancer activity, but one that can be safely administered to non-human primates without causing any toxic effects, is to make large amounts of the antibody for use in humans. Any therapeutic candidate that will be administered to humans must be made according to highly regulated procedures that produce an agent that is extremely “clean”, meaning free of viruses, other infectious agents, bacterial products, and other contaminating proteins. This type of production work can only be performed in special facilities that have the equipment and experience for this type of clinical manufacturing. We have contracted such an organization to manufacture clinical grade anti-human CD47 antibodies. This organization has commenced the lengthy process of making anti-CD47 antibody that can be administered to humans with cancer. It will take another 18 months to complete the process of manufacturing clinical grade material in sufficient quantities to run a Phase I clinical trial in patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.
  • Our program is focused on producing new therapeutic candidates to prolong remission and potentially cure highly lethal cancers where patients have few alternative treatment options. Our strategy is to develop an antibody that will eliminate the cancer stem cells which are the source of the disease, and responsible for the disease recurrence that can occur months-to-years following the remission achieved with initial clinical treatment. The cancer stem cells are a small proportion of the total cancer cell burden, and they appear to be resistant to the standard treatments of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Therefore new therapeutic approaches are needed to eliminate them.
  • In year 2 of the CIRM award, we have continued to develop a clinical-grade antibody that will eliminate the cancer stem cells in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML). We have identified several antibodies that cause human leukemia cells to be eaten and destroyed by healthy human white blood cells when tested in cell culture experiments. These antibodies bind to a protein called CD47 that is present on the outer surface of human leukemia cells. The anti-CD47 antibodies can eliminate leukemia growing in mice injected with AML cells obtained from patients. We have now extensively characterized the properties of our panel of anti-CD47 antibodies, and have identified the lead candidate to progress though the process of drug development. There are several steps in this process, which takes 18-24 months to fully execute. In the last 12 months, we have focused on the following steps:
  • (i) ‘Humanization’ of the antibody: The antibody needs to be optimized so that it looks like a normal human protein that the patient’s immune system will not eliminate because it appears ‘foreign’ to them.
  • (ii) Large scale production of the antibody: To make sufficient quantities of the antibody to complete the culture and animal model experiments required to progress to clinical safety trials with patients, we have contracted with a highly experienced manufacturing facility capable of such large-scale production. We have successfully transferred our antibody to them, and they have inserted it into a proprietary expression cell that will produce large amounts of the protein. This process is managed through weekly interactions with this contract lab. They send us small amounts of the material from each step of their manufacturing process and we test it in our models to ensure the antibody they are preparing retains its anti-cancer properties throughout production.
  • (iii) Pre-clinical safety studies: The antibody must be tested extensively in animals to ensure it does not cause serious limiting damage to any of the normal healthy tissues in the recipient. We have spent much of the last 12 months performing these types of safety experiments. The antibody has been administered to both mice and non-human primates and we have evaluated their overall health status, as well as analyzing their blood cells, blood enzyme levels, and urine, for up to 28 days. We have also collected samples of their organs and tissues to evaluate for abnormalities. Thus far, these assessments have appeared normal except for the development of a mild anemia a few days after the initial antibody injection. Subsequent experiments indicate that this anemia can be managed with existing approved clinical strategies
  • (iv) Determination of optimal dose: We have used mice injected with human cancer cells from AML patients, and determined how much antibody must be injected into these mice to produce a blood level that destroys the leukemia cells. This relationship between antibody dose and anti-cancer activity in the mouse cancer model enables us to estimate the dose to administer to patients.
  • Hematologic tumors and many solid tumors are propagated by a subset of cells called cancer stem cells. These cells appear to be resistant to the standard cancer treatments of chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and therefore new therapeutic approaches are needed to eliminate them. We have developed a monoclonal antibody (anti-CD47 antibody) that recognizes and causes elimination of these cancer stem cells and other cells in the cancer, but not normal blood-forming stem cells or blood cells. Cancer stem cells regularly produce a cell surface ‘invisibility cloak’ called CD47, a ‘don’t eat me signal’ for cells of the native immune system. Anti-CD47 antibody counters the ‘cloak, allowing the patient’s natural immune system eating cells, called macrophages, to eliminate the cancer stem cells.
  • As discussed in our two-year report, we optimized our anti-CD47 antibody so that it looks like a normal human protein that the patient’s immune system will not eliminate because it appears ‘foreign’. In this third year of the grant, we initiated the pre-clinical development of this humanized antibody, and assigned the antibody the development name of Hu5F9. Our major accomplishments in the third year of our grant are as follows:
  • (i) In addition to the hematological malignancies we have studied in previous years, we have now demonstrated the Hu5F9 is effective at inhibiting the growth and spread throughout the body [metastasis] of a large panel of human solid tumors, including breast, bladder, colon, ovarian, glioblastoma [a very aggressive brain cancer], leiomyosarcoma, head & neck squamous cell carcinoma, and multiple myeloma.
  • (ii) We have performed extensive studies optimizing the production and purification of Hu5F9 to standards compatible with use in humans, including that it is sterile, free of contaminating viruses, microorganisms, and bacterial products. We will commence manufacturing of Hu5F under highly regulated sterile conditions to produce what is known as GMP material, suitable for use in humans.
  • (iii) Another step to show Hu5F9 is safe to administer to humans is to administer it to experimental animals and observe its effects. We have demonstrated that Hu5F9 is safe and well tolerated when administered to experimental animals. Notably, no major abnormalities are detected when blood levels of the drug are maintained in the potentially therapeutic range for an extended duration of time.
  • (iv) We have initiated discussions with the FDA regarding the readiness of our program for initiating clinical trials, which we anticipate to start in the first quarter of 2014. To prepare for these trials we have established a collaboration between the Stanford Cancer Institute and the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, currently our partners in this CIRM-funded program.
  • To our knowledge, CD47 is the first common target in all human cancers, one which has a known function that enables cancers to grow and spread, and one which we have successfully targeted for cancer therapy. Our studies show that Hu5F9 is a first-in-class therapeutic candidate that offers cancer treatment a totally new mechanism of enabling the patient’s immune system to remove cancer stem cells and their metastases.

Stem cell therapies for Huntington’s Disease and other neurodegenerative disorders

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Research I
Grant Number: 
DR1-01485
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$0
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
One in every ten thousand people in the USA has Huntington's disease, and it impacts many more. Multiple generations within a family can inherit the disease, resulting in escalating health care costs and draining family resources. This highly devastating and fatal disease touches all races and socioeconomic levels, and there are currently no cures. Screening for the mutant HD gene is available, but the at-risk children of an affected parent often do not wish to be tested since there are currently no early prevention strategies or effective treatments. HD is a challenging disease to treat. Not only do the affected, dying neurons need to be salvaged or replaced, but also the levels of the toxic mutant protein must be diminished to prevent further neural damage and to halt progression of the movement disorders, physical, mental, and emotional decline that is associated with HD. Intrastriatal implantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) has significant neurorestorative effects, in animal models. We have discovered that MSC are remarkably effective delivery vehicles, moving robustly through the tissue and infusing therapeutic molecules into each damaged cell that they contact. Thus we are utilizing nature's own paramedic system, but we are arming them with new tools to also reduce mutant protein levels and to enhance the health of at-risk neurons. Our novel animal models will allow the therapy to be carefully tested in preparation for a phase 1 clinical trial of MSC infusion into the striata to restore the health of neurons that have been damaged by the mutant htt protein. Additional proposed trials building upon the initial trial are designed to reduce harmful levels of the mutant htt protein, to provide additional factors to restore function to damaged neurons, and finally, to replace the damaged striatal neurons with new ones. The significance of our studies is very high because there are currently no treatments to diminish the amount of toxic mutant htt protein in the neurons of patients affected by Huntington’s disease. There are no cures or successful clinical trials to reverse the decline in striatal neuron number and striatal volume. Our therapeutic strategy is initially examining models to treat HD, since the need is so acute. But this biological delivery system for siRNA and BDNF could also be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1), Alzheimer's Disease, and some forms of Parkinson's Disease, where neuroregeneration and reduction of the levels of a mutant or disease-activating protein could be curative. Development of novel stem cell therapies is extremely important for the community of HD and neurodegenerative disease researchers, patients, and families. Since HD patients unfortunately have few other options, the benefit to risk ratio for the planned trials is extremely high.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
It is estimated that one in 10,000 CA residents have Huntington’s disease (HD). While the financial burden of HD is estimated to be in the billions, the emotional cost to friends, families, and those with or at risk for HD is immeasurable. Health care costs are extremely high for HD patients due to the long progression of the disease. The lost ability of HD patients to remain in the CA workforce and to support their families causes additional financial strain on the state’s economy. HD is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, which means that 50% of the children of an HD patient will inherit the disease and will in turn pass it on to 50% of their children. Individuals diagnosed through genetic testing are at risk of losing insurance coverage. Since there are currently no cures or successful clinical trials to treat HD, many are reluctant to be tested. We are designing trials to treat HD through healing neurons in the earlier phases of the disease and replacing them in later stages. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been shown to have significant effects on restoring synaptic connections between damaged neurons, promoting neurite outgrowth, secreting anti-apoptotic factors in the brain, and regulating inflammation. In addition to many trials that have assessed the safety and efficacy of human MSC delivery to tissues via systemic IV infusion, MSC are also under consideration for treatment of disorders in the CNS, although few MSC clinical trials have started so far with direct delivery to brain or spinal cord tissue. Therefore we are conducting detailed studies in support of clinical trials that will feature MSC implantation into the brain, either alone or as supporting cells for astrocytes or NSC and hESC-derived medium spiny neurons. MSC can be transferred from one donor to the next without tissue matching because they shelter themselves from the immune system. Also, by engineering MSC to secrete siRNA to reduce levels of the mutant protein through RNA destruction, we hope to provide the patients with a long-term therapy for their disease. We have demonstrated the safe and effective production of engineered molecules from human MSC for at least 18 months, in pre-clinical animal studies. Our therapeutic strategy will initially examine models to treat HD, since the need is so acute. HD patient advocates are admirably among the most vocal in California about their desire for CIRM-funded cures, attending almost every ICOC meeting. This would be the first approved cellular therapy for HD patients and would have a major impact on those affected in California. In addition, the methods and preclinical testing that we are developing will have far-reaching impact on the treatment of other neurodegenerative disorders.
Progress Report: 
  • Our program is focused on producing new therapeutic candidates to prolong remission and potentially cure highly lethal cancers where patients have few alternative treatment options. We have selected Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) as the initial clinical indication for evaluating our novel therapeutics, but anticipate a full development program encompassing many other types of solid tumor cancers.
  • Our strategy is to develop an antibody that binds to and eliminates the cancer-forming stem cells in leukemia and other solid tumors. While current cancer treatments (e.g. surgery, chemotherapy, radiation) will frequently get rid of the bulk of the tumor, they rarely touch the tiny number of cancer stem cells that actually re-generate the masses of cancer cells that have been eliminated. When the latter occurs, the patient is described as having a relapse, leading to a disease recurrence with poor prognosis. Our strategy is to eliminate the small number of cancer-regenerating stem cells by targeting cell membrane proteins expressed by these cells.
  • We have discovered that many cancer cells coat themselves with a protein called CD47 that prevents them from being eaten and disposed of by the patient’s blood cells. In this context, CD47 can be considered a ‘don’t eat me’ signal that protects the cancer cells from being phagocytosed i.e. ‘eaten’. The antibody we are developing binds to and covers the ‘don’t eat me’ CD47 protein, so that the patient’s blood cells are now able to ‘eat’ the cancer cells by standard physiological responses, and eliminate them from the body.
  • Developing an antibody such as this for use in humans requires many steps to evaluate it is safe, while at the same ensuring it targets and eliminates the cancer forming stem cells. The antibody must also ‘look’ like a human antibody, or else the patient will ‘see’ it as a foreign protein and reject it. To achieve these criteria, we have made humanized antibodies that bind to human CD47. We have shown that the antibodies eliminate cancer cells in two ways: (i) blood cells from healthy humans rapidly “ate” and killed leukemia cells collected from separate cancer patients when the anti-human CD47 antibody was added to a mixture of both cell types in a research laboratory test tube; (ii) the anti-human CD47 antibody eliminates human leukemia cells collected from patients, then transferred into special immunodeficient mice which are unable to eliminate the human tumor cells themselves. In these experiments, the treated mice remained free of the human leukemia cells for many weeks post-treatment, and could be regarded as being cured of malignancy.
  • To show the antibodies were safe, we administered to regular mice large amounts of a comparable anti-mouse CD47 antibody on a daily basis for a period of many months. No adverse effects were noted. Unfortunately our antibody to human CD47 did not bind to mouse CD47, so it’s safety could not be evaluated directly in mice. Since the anti-human CD47 antibody does bind to non-human primate CD47, safety studies for our candidate therapeutic need to be conducted in non-human primates. These studies have been initiated and are in progress. Following administration of the anti-human CD47 antibodies, the non-human primates will be monitored for clinical blood pathology, which, as in humans, provides information about major organ function as well as blood cell function in these animals.
  • The next step after identifying an antibody with strong anti-cancer activity, but one that can be safely administered to non-human primates without causing any toxic effects, is to make large amounts of the antibody for use in humans. Any therapeutic candidate that will be administered to humans must be made according to highly regulated procedures that produce an agent that is extremely “clean”, meaning free of viruses, other infectious agents, bacterial products, and other contaminating proteins. This type of production work can only be performed in special facilities that have the equipment and experience for this type of clinical manufacturing. We have contracted such an organization to manufacture clinical grade anti-human CD47 antibodies. This organization has commenced the lengthy process of making anti-CD47 antibody that can be administered to humans with cancer. It will take another 18 months to complete the process of manufacturing clinical grade material in sufficient quantities to run a Phase I clinical trial in patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.
  • Our program is focused on producing new therapeutic candidates to prolong remission and potentially cure highly lethal cancers where patients have few alternative treatment options. Our strategy is to develop an antibody that will eliminate the cancer stem cells which are the source of the disease, and responsible for the disease recurrence that can occur months-to-years following the remission achieved with initial clinical treatment. The cancer stem cells are a small proportion of the total cancer cell burden, and they appear to be resistant to the standard treatments of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Therefore new therapeutic approaches are needed to eliminate them.
  • In year 2 of the CIRM award, we have continued to develop a clinical-grade antibody that will eliminate the cancer stem cells in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML). We have identified several antibodies that cause human leukemia cells to be eaten and destroyed by healthy human white blood cells when tested in cell culture experiments. These antibodies bind to a protein called CD47 that is present on the outer surface of human leukemia cells. The anti-CD47 antibodies can eliminate leukemia growing in mice injected with AML cells obtained from patients. We have now extensively characterized the properties of our panel of anti-CD47 antibodies, and have identified the lead candidate to progress though the process of drug development. There are several steps in this process, which takes 18-24 months to fully execute. In the last 12 months, we have focused on the following steps:
  • (i) ‘Humanization’ of the antibody: The antibody needs to be optimized so that it looks like a normal human protein that the patient’s immune system will not eliminate because it appears ‘foreign’ to them.
  • (ii) Large scale production of the antibody: To make sufficient quantities of the antibody to complete the culture and animal model experiments required to progress to clinical safety trials with patients, we have contracted with a highly experienced manufacturing facility capable of such large-scale production. We have successfully transferred our antibody to them, and they have inserted it into a proprietary expression cell that will produce large amounts of the protein. This process is managed through weekly interactions with this contract lab. They send us small amounts of the material from each step of their manufacturing process and we test it in our models to ensure the antibody they are preparing retains its anti-cancer properties throughout production.
  • (iii) Pre-clinical safety studies: The antibody must be tested extensively in animals to ensure it does not cause serious limiting damage to any of the normal healthy tissues in the recipient. We have spent much of the last 12 months performing these types of safety experiments. The antibody has been administered to both mice and non-human primates and we have evaluated their overall health status, as well as analyzing their blood cells, blood enzyme levels, and urine, for up to 28 days. We have also collected samples of their organs and tissues to evaluate for abnormalities. Thus far, these assessments have appeared normal except for the development of a mild anemia a few days after the initial antibody injection. Subsequent experiments indicate that this anemia can be managed with existing approved clinical strategies
  • (iv) Determination of optimal dose: We have used mice injected with human cancer cells from AML patients, and determined how much antibody must be injected into these mice to produce a blood level that destroys the leukemia cells. This relationship between antibody dose and anti-cancer activity in the mouse cancer model enables us to estimate the dose to administer to patients.
  • Hematologic tumors and many solid tumors are propagated by a subset of cells called cancer stem cells. These cells appear to be resistant to the standard cancer treatments of chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and therefore new therapeutic approaches are needed to eliminate them. We have developed a monoclonal antibody (anti-CD47 antibody) that recognizes and causes elimination of these cancer stem cells and other cells in the cancer, but not normal blood-forming stem cells or blood cells. Cancer stem cells regularly produce a cell surface ‘invisibility cloak’ called CD47, a ‘don’t eat me signal’ for cells of the native immune system. Anti-CD47 antibody counters the ‘cloak, allowing the patient’s natural immune system eating cells, called macrophages, to eliminate the cancer stem cells.
  • As discussed in our two-year report, we optimized our anti-CD47 antibody so that it looks like a normal human protein that the patient’s immune system will not eliminate because it appears ‘foreign’. In this third year of the grant, we initiated the pre-clinical development of this humanized antibody, and assigned the antibody the development name of Hu5F9. Our major accomplishments in the third year of our grant are as follows:
  • (i) In addition to the hematological malignancies we have studied in previous years, we have now demonstrated the Hu5F9 is effective at inhibiting the growth and spread throughout the body [metastasis] of a large panel of human solid tumors, including breast, bladder, colon, ovarian, glioblastoma [a very aggressive brain cancer], leiomyosarcoma, head & neck squamous cell carcinoma, and multiple myeloma.
  • (ii) We have performed extensive studies optimizing the production and purification of Hu5F9 to standards compatible with use in humans, including that it is sterile, free of contaminating viruses, microorganisms, and bacterial products. We will commence manufacturing of Hu5F under highly regulated sterile conditions to produce what is known as GMP material, suitable for use in humans.
  • (iii) Another step to show Hu5F9 is safe to administer to humans is to administer it to experimental animals and observe its effects. We have demonstrated that Hu5F9 is safe and well tolerated when administered to experimental animals. Notably, no major abnormalities are detected when blood levels of the drug are maintained in the potentially therapeutic range for an extended duration of time.
  • (iv) We have initiated discussions with the FDA regarding the readiness of our program for initiating clinical trials, which we anticipate to start in the first quarter of 2014. To prepare for these trials we have established a collaboration between the Stanford Cancer Institute and the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, currently our partners in this CIRM-funded program.
  • To our knowledge, CD47 is the first common target in all human cancers, one which has a known function that enables cancers to grow and spread, and one which we have successfully targeted for cancer therapy. Our studies show that Hu5F9 is a first-in-class therapeutic candidate that offers cancer treatment a totally new mechanism of enabling the patient’s immune system to remove cancer stem cells and their metastases.

Prostaglandin pathway regulation of self-renwal in hematopoietic and leukemia stem cells

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-06036
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 244 455
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cancer Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Leukemias are cancers of the blood cells that result from corruption of the normal controls that regulate blood-forming stem cells. They are serious causes of illness and death, and are particularly devastating in children and the elderly. Despite substantial advances in treatment of leukemia, a significant proportion of cases are unresponsive to current therapy. Since more aggressive chemotherapy regimens provide only marginal improvements in therapeutic efficacy, we have reached a point of diminishing returns using currently available drugs. Thus, there is an urgent need for more targeted, less toxic, and more effective treatments. To this end, our studies focus on defining the defects that corrupt the normal growth controls on blood stem cells. The proposed studies build on our discovery of a key enzyme with an unexpected causative role in leukemia. We propose to further characterize its function using various proteomic approaches, and employ a cross-species comparative approach to identify additional pathways unique to cancer stem cell function. The proposed characterization of crucial growth controls that go awry in blood stem cells to cause leukemia will identify new drug targets for more effective and less toxic treatments against these devastating, life-threatening diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Leukemias are cancers of the blood cells that cause serious illness and death in children and adults. They result from corruption of the normal controls that regulate blood-forming stem cells. Despite many attempts to improve treatments with new drug combinations, this approach has reached a point of diminishing returns since intensified chemotherapies contribute only marginal improvement in outcome and are associated with increasing toxicity. The proposed characterization of crucial growth controls that go awry in blood stem cells to cause leukemia will identify new drug targets for more effective and less toxic treatments against these devastating, life-threatening diseases.
Progress Report: 
  • Leukemias are cancers of the blood cells that cause serious illness and death in children and adults. Even patients who are successfully cured of their disease often suffer from long-term deleterious health effects of their curative treatment. Thus, there is a need for more targeted, less toxic, and more effective treatments. Our studies focus on the defects and mechanisms that induce leukemia by disrupting the normal growth controls that regulate blood-forming stem cells. Using a comparative genomics approach we have identified genes that are differentially expressed in leukemia stem cells. These genes have been the focus of our studies to establish better biomarkers and treatment targets. One candidate gene codes for an enzyme with a previously unknown, non-canonical causal role in a specific genetic subtype of leukemia caused by abnormalities of the MLL oncogene. To characterize its molecular contributions, we are identifying and characterizing protein partners that may assist and interact with the enzyme in its oncogenic role. Candidate interaction partners have been identified using proteomic techniques, and are being investigated for their possible mechanistic roles in leukemia stem cell functions. Another promising candidate that we identified in the comparative gene expression approach encodes a cell surface protein that is preferentially expressed on leukemia stem cells. We have exploited this cell surface protein as a marker to isolate the rare population of cells in human leukemias with stem cell properties. This technical approach has resulted in the isolation of leukemia stem cell populations that are more highly enriched than those obtained using previous techniques. The highly enriched sub-population of leukemia stem cells has been used for comparative gene expression profiling to define a dataset of genes that are differentially expressed between highly matched populations of leukemia cells that are enriched or depleted of leukemia stem cells. Bioinformatics analysis of the dataset has further suggested specific cellular processes and transcriptional regulatory factors that distinguish human leukemia stem cells caused by abnormalities of the MLL oncogene. These newly identified factors will be studied using in vitro and in vivo assays for their specific contributions to leukemia stem cell function and leukemia pathogenesis. Continued characterization of crucial growth controls that go awry in blood stem cells to cause leukemia will identify new drug targets for more effective and less toxic treatments against these devastating, life-threatening diseases.

Dual targeting of tyrosine kinase and BCL6 signaling for leukemia stem cell eradication

Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01816-A
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 607 305
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cancer Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
Leukemia is the most frequent form of cancer in children and teenagers, but is also common in adults. Chemotherapy has vastly improved the outcome of leukemia over the past four decades. However, many patients still die because of recurrence of the disease and development of drug-resistance in leukemia cells. In preliminary studies for this proposal we discovered that in most if not all leukemia subtypes, the malignant cells can switch between an “proliferation phase” and a “quiescence phase”. The “proliferation phase” is often driven by oncogenic tyrosine kinases (e. g. FLT3, JAK2, PDGFR, BCR-ABL1, SRC kinases) and is characterized by vigorous proliferation of leukemia cells. In this phase, leukemia cells not only rapidly divide, they are also highly susceptible to undergo programmed cell death and to age prematurely. In contrast, leukemia cells in “quiescence phase” divide only rarely. At the same time, however, leukemia cells in "quiescence phase" are highly drug-resistant. These cells are also called 'leukemia stem cells' because they exhibit a high degree of self-renewal capacity and hence, the ability to initiate leukemia. We discovered that the BCL6 factor is required to maintain leukemia stem cells in this well-protected safe haven. Our findings demonstrate that the "quiescence phase" is strictly dependent on BCL6, which allows them to evade cell death during chemotherapy treatment. Once chemotherapy treatment has ceased, persisting leukemia stem cells give rise to leukemia clones that reenter "proliferation phase" and hence initiate recurrence of the disease. Pharmacological inhibition of BCL6 using inhibitory peptides or blocking molecules leads to selective loss of leukemia stem cells, which can no longer persist in a "quiescence phase". In this proposal, we test a novel therapeutic concept eradicate leukemia stem cells: We propose that dual targeting of oncogenic tyrosine kinases (“proliferation”) and BCL6 (“quiescence”) represents a powerful strategy to eradicate drug-resistant leukemia stem cells and prevent the acquisition of drug-resistance and recurrence of the disease. Targeting of BCL6-dependent leukemia stem cells may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse and may limit the duration of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in some leukemias, which is currently life-long.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Leukemia represents the most frequent malignancy in children and teenagers and is common in adults as well. Over the past four decades, the development of therapeutic options has greatly improved the prognosis of patients with leukemia reaching 5 year disease-free survival rates of ~70% for children and ~45% for adults. Despite its relatively favorable overall prognosis, leukemia remains one of the leading causes of person-years of life lost in the US (362,000 years in 2006; National Center of Health Statistics), which is attributed to the high incidence of leukemia in children. In 2008, the California Cancer Registry expected 3,655 patients with newly diagnosed leukemia and at total of 2,185 death resulting from fatal leukemia. In addition, ~23,300 Californians lived with leukemia in 2008, which highlights that leukemia remains a frequent and life-threatening disease in the State of California despite substantial clinical progress. Here we propose the development of a fundamentally novel treatment approach for leukemia that is directed at leukemia stem cells. While current treatment approaches effectively diminish the bulk of proliferating leukemia cells, they fail to eradicate the rare leukemia stem cells, which give rise to drug-resistance and recurrence of the disease. We propose a dual targeting approach which combines targeted therapy of the leukemia-causing oncogene and the newly discovered leukemia stem cell survival factor BCL6. The power of this new therapy approach will be tested in clinical trials to be started in the State of California.
Progress Report: 
  • Leukemia is the most frequent form of cancer in children and teenagers, but is also common in adults. Chemotherapy has vastly improved the outcome of leukemia over the past four decades. However, many patients still die because of recurrence of the disease and development of drug-resistance in leukemia cells. In preliminary studies for this proposal we discovered that in most if not all leukemia subtypes, the malignant cells can switch between an "expansion phase" and a "dormancy phase". The "expansion phase" is often driven by oncogenic tyrosine kinases (e. g. FLT3, JAK2, PDGFR, BCR-ABL1, SRC kinases) and is characterized by vigorous proliferation of leukemia cells. In this phase, leukemia cells not only rapidly divide, they are also highly susceptible to undergo programmed cell death and to age prematurely. In contrast, leukemia cells in "quiescence phase" divide only rarely. At the same time, however, leukemia cells in "domancy phase" are highly drug-resistant. These cells are also called 'leukemia stem cells' because they exhibit a high degree of self-renewal capacity and hence, the ability to initiate leukemia.
  • Progress during Year 1: During the first year of this project, we discovered that the BCL6 factor is required to maintain leukemia stem cells in this well-protected safe haven. Our findings during year 1 demonstrate that the "dormancy phase" is strictly dependent on BCL6, which allows them to evade cell death during chemotherapy treatment. Once chemotherapy treatment has ceased, persisting leukemia stem cells give rise to leukemia clones that reenter "proliferation phase" and hence initiate recurrence of the disease. Pharmacological inhibition of BCL6 using inhibitory peptides or blocking molecules leads to selective loss of leukemia stem cells, which can no longer persist in a "dormancy phase" .
  • In year 1, we have performed screening procedures to identify novel therapeutic BCL6 inhibitors to eradicate leukemia stem cells: We have found that dual targeting of oncogenic tyrosine kinases ("expansion phase" ) and BCL6 ("dormancy phase") represents a powerful strategy to eradicate drug-resistant leukemia stem cells and prevent the acquisition of drug-resistance and recurrence of the disease.
  • Goal for years 2-3: Targeting of BCL6-dependent leukemia stem cells may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse and may limit the duration of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in some leukemias, which is currently life-long.

Dual targeting of tyrosine kinase and BCL6 signaling for leukemia stem cell eradication

Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01816-B
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 607 305
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Collaborative Funder: 
Germany
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cancer Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Leukemia is the most frequent form of cancer in children and teenagers, but is also common in adults. Chemotherapy has vastly improved the outcome of leukemia over the past four decades. However, many patients still die because of recurrence of the disease and development of drug-resistance in leukemia cells. In preliminary studies for this proposal we discovered that in most if not all leukemia subtypes, the malignant cells can switch between an “proliferation phase” and a “quiescence phase”. The “proliferation phase” is often driven by oncogenic tyrosine kinases (e. g. FLT3, JAK2, PDGFR, BCR-ABL1, SRC kinases) and is characterized by vigorous proliferation of leukemia cells. In this phase, leukemia cells not only rapidly divide, they are also highly susceptible to undergo programmed cell death and to age prematurely. In contrast, leukemia cells in “quiescence phase” divide only rarely. At the same time, however, leukemia cells in "quiescence phase" are highly drug-resistant. These cells are also called 'leukemia stem cells' because they exhibit a high degree of self-renewal capacity and hence, the ability to initiate leukemia. We discovered that the BCL6 factor is required to maintain leukemia stem cells in this well-protected safe haven. Our findings demonstrate that the "quiescence phase" is strictly dependent on BCL6, which allows them to evade cell death during chemotherapy treatment. Once chemotherapy treatment has ceased, persisting leukemia stem cells give rise to leukemia clones that reenter "proliferation phase" and hence initiate recurrence of the disease. Pharmacological inhibition of BCL6 using inhibitory peptides or blocking molecules leads to selective loss of leukemia stem cells, which can no longer persist in a "quiescence phase". In this proposal, we test a novel therapeutic concept eradicate leukemia stem cells: We propose that dual targeting of oncogenic tyrosine kinases (“proliferation”) and BCL6 (“quiescence”) represents a powerful strategy to eradicate drug-resistant leukemia stem cells and prevent the acquisition of drug-resistance and recurrence of the disease. Targeting of BCL6-dependent leukemia stem cells may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse and may limit the duration of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in some leukemias, which is currently life-long.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Leukemia represents the most frequent malignancy in children and teenagers and is common in adults as well. Over the past four decades, the development of therapeutic options has greatly improved the prognosis of patients with leukemia reaching 5 year disease-free survival rates of ~70% for children and ~45% for adults. Despite its relatively favorable overall prognosis, leukemia remains one of the leading causes of person-years of life lost in the US (362,000 years in 2006; National Center of Health Statistics), which is attributed to the high incidence of leukemia in children. In 2008, the California Cancer Registry expected 3,655 patients with newly diagnosed leukemia and at total of 2,185 death resulting from fatal leukemia. In addition, ~23,300 Californians lived with leukemia in 2008, which highlights that leukemia remains a frequent and life-threatening disease in the State of California despite substantial clinical progress. Here we propose the development of a fundamentally novel treatment approach for leukemia that is directed at leukemia stem cells. While current treatment approaches effectively diminish the bulk of proliferating leukemia cells, they fail to eradicate the rare leukemia stem cells, which give rise to drug-resistance and recurrence of the disease. We propose a dual targeting approach which combines targeted therapy of the leukemia-causing oncogene and the newly discovered leukemia stem cell survival factor BCL6. The power of this new therapy approach will be tested in clinical trials to be started in the State of California.
Progress Report: 
  • During the past reporting period (months 18-24 of this grant), we have made progress towards all three milestones. Major progress in Milestone 1 was made by identifying 391 compounds in 10 lead classes that will be developed further in a secondary fragment-based screen. While the goal of identifying lead class compounds with BCL6 inhibitory activity has already been met, we propose to run a secondary, fragment-based screen to refine the existing lead compounds and prioritize a small number for cell-based validation in Milestone 2. The success in Milestone 1 was based on computational modeling, HTS of 200,000 compounds and Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD).
  • For Milestone 2, we have successfully established POC analysis tools for validation of the ability of compounds to bind the BCL6 lateral groove and already produced 300 mg of BCL6-BTB domain protein needed for biochemical binding assays. Progress in Milestone 2 is based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assays. In the coming months, we will use crystallographic fragment screening using a subset of our fragment library in addition to SPR and NMR, since crystallographic fragment screens have been shown to yield complimentary hits. For Milestone 3, we have now set up a reliable method to measure disease-modifying activity of BCL6-inhibitory compounds based on a newly generated knockin BCL6 reporter mouse model, in which transcriptional activation of the endogenous BCL6 promoter drives expression of mCherry. This addresses a main caveat of these measurements was that they were strongly influenced by the copy number of lentivector integrations. The BCL6fl/+-mCherry knockin BCL6 reporter system will provide a stable platform to study BCL6-expressing leukemia cells and effects of BCL6 small molecule inhibitors on survival and proliferation on BCL6-dependent leukemia cell populations. This will be a key requirement to measure disease-modifying activity of inhibitory compounds in large-scale assays in Milestone 3. Other requirements (e.g. leukemia xenografts) are already in place. 

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