WALQ team for saving limbs and keeping Californians on their feet

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Research I
Grant Number: 
DR1-01452
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$0
Disease Focus: 
Blood Disorders
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
The goal of the WALQ team is to develop and apply safe and effective stem cell therapies to save limbs from amputation due to disorders of the vasculature, skin, and bone that currently cannot be cured. The implementation of our planned therapies will significantly reduce the cost of healthcare in California. Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) represents an unmet medical need without any curative therapies in its end stages. Even the best revascularization attempts using sophisticated catheters and stents have failed. CLI affects 2 million people in the US, with painful symptoms that often do not respond to therapy. Patients experience diminished quality of life, progress to immobility and need constant care. The final stage is often limb amputation, followed by death within 6 months. The rate of primary amputation at initial presentation is as high as 25%. Amputation rates in patients not suitable for revascularization are reported to be up to 30-50% after 1 year. Treatment costs are exorbitant and lives are significantly shortened by this disease. Chronic skin ulcers present another immense burden and challenge to patients, payers, and society. Venous stasis ulcers, which account for 80-90% of all leg ulcers, occur at a higher incidence in people over 60, a growing part of our society. These ulcers do not easily heal, need constant medical attention, put patients at risk for infections, and can immobilize the individual. They can lead to severe complications (necrosis and gangrene) leaving no alternative but amputation. The number of cases in the US surpasses 700,000 annually, with the cost for chronic patient care ranging from $20-30K per patient. It has also been estimated that in the U.S., nearly a billion dollars are spent annually treating venous ulcers. The current standard of care often does not improve wound healing. Osteoarthritis impacts the quality of life of more than 20 million Americans. Normal bone tissue is highly plastic and is constantly rebuilt to adapt to changing demands. It is vascularized with sufficient amounts of oxygen and nutrients provided through the bloodstream for new bone formation. Avascular necrosis of the bone (AVN) is a painful and debilitating disease resulting from loss of the blood supply, causing bones to weaken and collapse. This disease manifests itself in the load bearing joints, particularly the hip. Advanced stages are treated with total hip replacement, which has many drawbacks. Patients with sickle cell anemia can also develop avascular necrosis which may lead to complete disability at a very young age. The costs of care for the lifetime of the disabled person are high; along with the personal suffering due to the inability to move without pain. Our three clinical trials proposed to treat vascular, wound, and bone disease can be relatively rapidly and safely implemented to see a significant and measurable reduction in the costs of long-term care for these debilitating diseases, throughout California
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The goal of the WALQ team is to develop and apply safe and effective stem cell therapies to save limbs from amputation due to disorders of the vasculature, skin, and bone that currently cannot be cured. The implementation of our planned therapies will significantly reduce the cost of healthcare in California. Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) represents a significant unmet medical need without any curative therapies in its end stages, after even the best revascularization attempts using sophisticated catheters and stents have failed. CLI affects 2 million people in the US, causes painful symptoms which often do not respond to therapy. Patients experience greatly diminished quality of life, progress to immobility and need constant care. The final stage, in many cases is limb amputation, often followed by death within 6 months. The rate of primary amputation at initial presentation is as high as 25%. Amputation rates in patients not suitable for revascularization are reported to be up to 30-50% after 1 year. Treatment costs are immense and lives are significantly shortened by this disease. Chronic skin ulcers present another immense burden and challenge to patients, payers, and society. Venous stasis ulcers, which account for 80-90% of all leg ulcers, occur at high incidence rates in people over 60 years of age, a largely growing part of our society. These ulcers do not heal easily, need constant medical attention, put patients at risk for infections, and often immobilize the individual. Over a period of time they can also cause severe complications (necrosis and gangrene) leaving no other alternative but amputation. The number of cases in the US surpasses 700,000 annually, with the cost for chronic patient care ranging from $20-30K per patient. It has also been estimated that in the U.S., nearly a billion dollars are spent annually treating venous ulcers. The current standard of care may improve outcome, but in many cases there is no improvement in healing. New therapies are desperately needed. Osteoarthritis severely compromises the quality of life of more than 20 million Americans. Normally, bone tissue is highly plastic and is constantly rebuilt to adapt to changing demands. Therefore, it is greatly vascularized to receive sufficient amounts of oxygen and nutrients through the bloodstream for new bone formation. Avascular necrosis of the bone (AVN) is a painful and debilitating disease resulting from loss of the blood supply to the bones, causing them to weaken and collapse. This disease manifests itself in highly load bearing joints, particularly the hip. Advanced stages are treated with total hip replacement, which has many drawbacks. Another group, patients with sickle cell anemia can also develop avascular necrosis which may lead to complete disability at a very young age. The costs of care, for the rest of the life of the disabled person are very high, let alone the suffering from not being able to move without pain. Our three clinical trial
Progress Report: 
  • The clinical complications of sickle cell disease are due to the inherited abnormality of the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin protein in red blood cells (RBC). The RBC are made from stem cells in the bone marrow and transplantation of stem cells from the bone marrow of a healthy donor to someone with sickle cell disease (SCD) can lead to significant improvements in their health. However, most people do not have a matched sibling donor, and transplants from unrelated donors have higher risks for complications, mainly due to immune reactions between the donor and the recipient.
  • The goal of this project is to bring to the clinic a trial of treating patients with SCD by transplanting them with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been modified in the lab by adding the gene for a version of human beta-globin that will act to inhibit sickling of the patient’s RBC (“anti-sickling” gene). This approach may provide a way to improve the health of people with SCD, with advantages over clinical treatments using transplantation of bone marrow stem cells from another person.
  • The major Year 1 Milestone was to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, i.e. that the clinical cell product, the subject’s bone marrow stem cells modified with the anti-sickling gene, can be produced suitably for clinical transplantation and that enough of the anti-sickling hemoglobin is made to reverse sickling of RBC made from the gene-modified stem cells.
  • Studies done by the Laboratory component of our Disease Team showed that the gene transfer lentiviral vector we developed to insert the anti-sickling gene into bone marrow stem cells met pre-set technical criteria for: the amount of vector that can be made, its efficiency to insert the anti-sickling gene into human bone marrow stem cells, the levels of anti-sickling beta-globin protein made by the vector in RBC made from bone marrow stem cells, and the absence of adverse effects on the stem cells or their ability to make new RBC. These successful results allow advancement to the major lab focus for Years 2-3, pre-clinical efficacy and safety studies to support an IND application.
  • The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease team established the proposed network of California clinical hematology sites to obtain bone marrow samples from volunteer donors with SCD for laboratory research studies on cell product development (UCLA, CHLA and CHRCO). We put into place the necessary IRB-approved protocols to collect bone marrow samples at these sites to use for the laboratory research at UCLA and USC. This network obtained its first BM sample from a SCD donor on 3/18/2010 and a total of 15 over the year. These patient-derived samples have been truly essential to the advancement of the laboratory work because bone marrow from SCD patients is needed for studies to measure expression of the anti-sickling gene and improvement in RBC sickling.
  • The Clinical Regulatory component has also produced a complete first draft of the clinical trial protocol, which defines which specific people with SCD would be eligible for participation in this study, and the exact approach of the clinical study, including how the patients will be evaluated before the procedure, the details of the bone marrow harvest, stem cell processing and transplant processes, and how the effects of the procedure will be assessed. This protocol was conceived with input from the Team of physicians and scientists with expertise in clinical and experimental hematology, bone marrow transplantation, transfusion medicine, gene therapy and cell processing laboratory methods, regulatory affairs, and biostatistics.
  • These efforts provided sufficient laboratory data and definition of the clinical approach that we could have a pre-pre-IND exchange with the FDA (on 09/30/10). This interaction provided us the opportunity to receive initial guidance for three key areas that would comprise the IND application: the draft clinical protocol, the methods to make and characterize the gene-modified stem cell product for transplant, and the planned pre-clinical safety studies. The meeting was encouraging and informative.
  • In Year 2, our laboratory work will focus on determining the functional effects of inserting the anti-sickling gene into bone marrow stem cells from SCD donors on sickling of the RBC. We will begin to define the laboratory test methods that would be used to measure the results in the clinical trial (% of stem and blood cells with the gene, the amounts of anti-sickling beta-globin made, and the effects on RBC sickling). We will continue to design the studies to formally test vector safety (Toxicology study). The major goal is to advance to a pre-IND meeting with the FDA which should provide further guidance to finalize the design of the pre-clinical toxicology study and the clinical trial design. We will then be ready to implement the toxicology study and begin regulatory reviews of the protocol by local and federal authorities.
  • The clinical complications of sickle cell disease are due to the inherited abnormality of the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin protein in red blood cells (RBC). The RBC are made from stem cells in the bone marrow and transplantation of stem cells from the bone marrow of a healthy donor to someone with sickle cell disease (SCD) can lead to significant improvements in their health. However, most people do not have a matched sibling donor, and transplants from unrelated donors have higher risks for complications, mainly due to immune reactions between the donor and the recipient.
  • The goal of this project is to bring to the clinical trial of treating patients with SCD by transplanting them with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been modified in the laboratory by adding the gene for a version of human beta-globin that will act to inhibit sickling of the patient’s RBC (“anti-sickling” gene). This approach may provide a way to improve the health of people with SCD, with advantages over clinical treatments using transplantation of bone marrow stem cells from another person.
  • In the first 2 years of this project we were able to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, i.e. that the clinical cell product, the subject’s bone marrow stem cells modified with the anti-sickling gene, can be produced suitably for clinical transplantation and that enough of the anti-sickling hemoglobin is made to reverse sickling of RBC made from the gene-modified stem cells.
  • Studies done by the Laboratory component of our Disease Team showed that the gene transfer lentiviral vector we developed to insert the anti-sickling gene into bone marrow stem cells met pre-set technical criteria for: the amount of vector that can be made, its efficiency to insert the anti-sickling gene into human bone marrow stem cells, the levels of anti-sickling beta-globin protein made by the vector in RBC, and the absence of adverse effects on the stem cells or their ability to make new RBC. These successful results allow advancement to the major lab focus for Year 3, safety studies to support an IND application.
  • The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease team established the proposed network of California clinical hematology sites to obtain bone marrow samples from volunteer donors with SCD for laboratory research studies on cell product development (UCLA, CHLA and CHRCO). We put into place the necessary IRB-approved protocols to collect bone marrow samples at these sites to use for the laboratory research at UCLA and USC. This network obtained its first BM sample from a SCD donor on 3/18/2010 and a total of 29 over 2 years. These patient-derived samples have been truly essential to the advancement of the laboratory work because bone marrow from SCD patients is needed for studies to measure expression of the anti-sickling gene and improvement in RBC sickling.
  • The Clinical Regulatory component has also produced a complete first draft of the clinical trial protocol, which defines which specific people with SCD would be eligible for participation in this study, and the exact approach of the clinical study, including how the patients will be evaluated before the procedure, the details of the bone marrow harvest, stem cell processing and transplant processes, and how the effects of the procedure will be assessed. This protocol was conceived with input from the Team of physicians and scientists with expertise in clinical and experimental hematology, bone marrow transplantation, transfusion medicine, gene therapy and cell processing laboratory methods, regulatory affairs, and biostatistics.
  • These efforts provided sufficient laboratory data and definition of the clinical approach that we could have a pre-IND meeting with the FDA (on 08/22/11). This interaction provided us the opportunity to receive guidance for three key areas that would comprise the IND application: the draft clinical protocol, the methods to make and characterize the gene-modified stem cell product for transplant, and the planned pre-clinical safety studies. The meeting was encouraging and informative.
  • In Year 3, our laboratory work will focus on performing pre-clinical safety studies (Toxicology study), qualifying end point assays and finalizing stem cell processing.
  • The clinical complications of sickle cell disease are due to the inherited abnormality of the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin protein in red blood cells (RBC). The RBC are made from stem cells in the bone marrow and transplantation of stem cells from the bone marrow of a healthy donor to someone with sickle cell disease (SCD) can lead to significant improvements in their health. However, most people do not have a matched sibling donor, and transplants from unrelated donors have higher risks for complications, mainly due to immune reactions between the donor and the recipient.
  • The goal of this project is to develop a clinical trial to treat patients with SCD by transplanting them with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been modified in the laboratory by adding the gene for a version of human beta-globin that will act to inhibit sickling of the patient’s RBC (“anti-sickling” gene). This approach may provide a way to improve the health of people with SCD, with advantages over clinical treatments using transplantation of bone marrow stem cells from another person.
  • In the first 2 years of this project we demonstrated the feasibility of this approach, i.e. that the clinical cell product, the subject’s bone marrow stem cells modified with the anti-sickling gene, can be produced suitably for clinical transplantation and that enough of the anti-sickling hemoglobin is made to reverse sickling of RBC made from the gene-modified stem cells. The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease Team established the proposed network of California clinical hematology sites to obtain bone marrow samples from volunteer donors with SCD for laboratory research studies on cell product development (UCLA, CHLA and CHRCO). We put into place the necessary IRB-approved protocols to collect bone marrow samples at these sites to use for the laboratory research at UCLA and USC. This network obtained its first BM sample from a SCD donor on 3/18/2010 and a total of 45 over 3 years. These patient-derived samples have been truly essential to the advancement of the laboratory work because bone marrow from SCD patients is needed for studies to measure expression of the anti-sickling gene and improvement in RBC sickling. The Clinical Regulatory component has also produced the clinical trial protocol, which defines which specific people with SCD would be eligible for participation in this study, and the exact approach of the clinical study, including how the patients will be evaluated before the procedure, the details of the bone marrow harvest, stem cell processing and transplant processes, and how the effects of the procedure will be assessed. This protocol was conceived with input from the Team of physicians and scientists with expertise in clinical and experimental hematology, bone marrow transplantation, transfusion medicine, gene therapy and cell processing laboratory methods, regulatory affairs, and biostatistics.
  • During the third year the Clinical Gene Therapy Laboratory component of the Team has demonstrated the feasibility of the stem cell processing procedure. Mimicking the future clinical scenario, the Lab was able to isolate stem cells from a largescale bone marrow harvest, insert the anti-sickling gene in adequate amount and recover the needed amount of stem cells that would be transplanted into the patient. The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease Team is focusing on validating all the assays that will be used during the clinical trial i.e. to characterize the final cell product and also the end-point assays to analyze the efficacy of this approach in patients. Another major focus during the third year has been safety and toxicology studies in a murine model of bone marrow transplant; the studies are still ongoing and will be completed in the next year. These successful results allow advancement to support an IND application in year 4.
  • CIRM DR1-01452 - Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease
  • Scientific Progress in Year 4
  • The clinical complications of sickle cell disease are due to the inherited abnormality of the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin protein in red blood cells (RBC). The RBC are made from stem cells in the bone marrow and transplantation of stem cells from the bone marrow of a healthy donor to someone with sickle cell disease (SCD) can lead to significant improvements in their health. However, most people do not have a matched sibling donor, and transplants from unrelated donors have higher risks for complications, mainly due to immune reactions between the donor and the recipient.
  • The goal of this project is to develop a clinical trial to treat patients with SCD by transplanting them with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been modified in the laboratory by adding the gene for a version of human beta-globin that will act to inhibit sickling of the patient’s RBC (“anti-sickling” gene). This approach may provide a way to improve the health of people with SCD, with advantages over clinical treatments using transplantation of bone marrow stem cells from another person.
  • In the first 2 years of this project, we demonstrated the feasibility of this approach, i.e. that the clinical cell product, the subject’s bone marrow stem cells modified with the anti-sickling gene, can be produced suitably for clinical transplantation and that enough of the anti-sickling hemoglobin is made to reverse sickling of RBC made from the gene-modified stem cells. The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease Team established the proposed network of California clinical hematology sites to obtain bone marrow samples from volunteer donors with SCD for laboratory research studies on cell product development (UCLA, CHLA and CHRCO). We put into place the necessary IRB-approved protocols to collect bone marrow samples at these sites to use for the laboratory research at UCLA and USC. This network obtained its first BM sample from a SCD donor on 3/18/2010 and a total of 56 over 4 years. These patient-derived samples have been truly essential to the advancement of the laboratory work because bone marrow from SCD patients is needed for studies to measure expression of the anti-sickling gene and improvement in RBC sickling. The Clinical Regulatory component has also produced the clinical trial protocol, which defines which specific people with SCD would be eligible for participation in this study, and the exact approach of the clinical study, including how the patients will be evaluated before the procedure, the details of the bone marrow harvest, stem cell processing and transplant processes, and how the effects of the procedure will be assessed. This protocol was conceived with input from the Team of physicians and scientists with expertise in clinical and experimental hematology, bone marrow transplantation, transfusion medicine, gene therapy and cell processing laboratory methods, regulatory affairs, and biostatistics. It has now been approved by the UCLA Institutional Review Board and the Institutional Scientific Protocol review Committee, as well as the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee.
  • During the last 2 years the Clinical Gene Therapy Laboratory component of the Team has demonstrated the feasibility of the stem cell processing procedure. Mimicking the future clinical scenario, the Lab was able to isolate stem cells from a large scale bone marrow harvest, insert the anti-sickling gene in adequate amount and recover the needed amount of stem cells that would be transplanted into the patient. The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease Team validated all the assays that will be used during the clinical trial i.e. to characterize the final cell product and also the end-point assays to analyze the efficacy of this approach in patients. Another major focus during the third and fourth year has been safety and toxicology studies in a murine model of bone marrow transplant; these successful results allow advancement to support an IND application in the second quarter of 2014, with a goal of opening the trial in the third quarter of the year.
  • The clinical complications of sickle cell disease are due to the inherited abnormality of the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin protein in red blood cells (RBC). The RBC are made from stem cells in the bone marrow and transplantation of stem cells from the bone marrow of a healthy donor to someone with sickle cell disease (SCD) can lead to significant improvements in their health. However, most people do not have a matched sibling donor, and transplants from unrelated donors have higher risks for complications, mainly due to immune reactions between the donor and the recipient.
  • The goal of this project is to develop a clinical trial to treat patients with SCD by transplanting them with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been modified in the laboratory by adding the gene for a version of human beta-globin that will act to inhibit sickling of the patient’s RBC (“anti-sickling” gene). This approach may provide a way to improve the health of people with SCD, with advantages over clinical treatments using transplantation of bone marrow stem cells from another person.
  • In the first 2 years of this project, we demonstrated the feasibility of this approach, i.e. that the clinical cell product, the subject’s bone marrow stem cells modified with the anti-sickling gene, can be produced suitably for clinical transplantation and that enough of the anti-sickling hemoglobin is made to reverse sickling of RBC made from the gene-modified stem cells. The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease Team established the proposed network of California clinical hematology sites to obtain bone marrow samples from volunteer donors with SCD for laboratory research studies on cell product development (UCLA, CHLA and CHRCO). We put into place the necessary IRB-approved protocols to collect bone marrow samples at these sites to use for the laboratory research at UCLA and USC. This network obtained its first BM sample from a SCD donor on 3/18/2010 and a total of 58 over 4+ years. These patient-derived samples have been truly essential to the advancement of the laboratory work because bone marrow from SCD patients is needed for studies to measure expression of the anti-sickling gene and improvement in RBC sickling. The Clinical Regulatory component has also produced the clinical trial protocol, which defines which specific people with SCD would be eligible for participation in this study, and the exact approach of the clinical study, including how the patients will be evaluated before the procedure, the details of the bone marrow harvest, stem cell processing and transplant processes, and how the effects of the procedure will be assessed. This protocol was conceived with input from the Team of physicians and scientists with expertise in clinical and experimental hematology, bone marrow transplantation, transfusion medicine, gene therapy and cell processing laboratory methods, regulatory affairs, and biostatistics. It has now been approved by the UCLA Institutional Review Board and the Institutional Scientific Protocol review Committee, as well as the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee.
  • During the last 2 years the Clinical Gene Therapy Laboratory component of the Team has demonstrated the feasibility of the stem cell processing procedure. Mimicking the future clinical scenario, the Lab was able to isolate stem cells from a large scale bone marrow harvest, insert the anti-sickling gene in adequate amount and recover the needed amount of stem cells that would be transplanted into the patient. The Clinical/Regulatory component of our Disease Team validated all the assays that will be used during the clinical trial i.e. to characterize the final cell product and also the end-point assays to analyze the efficacy of this approach in patients. Another major focus during the third and fourth year has been to demonstrate the safety of this approach in a murine model of bone marrow transplant; these successful results allowed advancement to support an IND application and opening a clinical trial for gene therapy of SCD in the second quarter of 2014.

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine