U.S./CFP Country Airway Team: Tissue Engineered Airways for Children with Tracheal Obstruction

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Research I
Grant Number: 
DR1-01444
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$0
Disease Focus: 
Vision Loss
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
The primary goal of our Airway Team is to bring a safe and effective therapy to children with severe large airway disease. Our intent is to implement all of the necessary steps for a successful new stem/progenitor cell-derived airway transplant for clinical trials in children within 4 years. Our team builds on a first-in-human surgical success with a stem cell-based tissue engineered airway implant in a compassionate care case in a young adult. To this end, we will perform the necessary preclinical studies to support a successful FDA application within 4 years. We propose to use stem/progenitor cells from the patient to treat an extraordinarily difficult-to-manage health problem in children, namely tracheobronchomalacia (TBM). TBM in children is a disease that leads to collapse of tracheal cartilage causing severe airway obstruction that is life-threatening. It occurs in approximately 200 California children each year and the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease is very high. Approximately 25% of these young patients die before their first birthday. Treatment costs for these children are very high, and the familial and societal investments are substantially higher, although outcomes are consistently poor. The endpoint desired is normal airway and lung function in these children and a normal quality of life. Our Airway Team aims to eliminate the need for repeated surgical interventions which are not necessarily successful, presently the standard of care for children with large airway obstruction. Bioengineered airway transplants that use the cells of the patients could be used in humans of all age groups and would not require lifelong, harmful anti-rejection medications. In 2008, a stem cell-based, tissue engineered tracheal implant was successfully used by our Airway Team partners to save a young woman’s life. This first-in-human study emphasizes that our goal is realistic and paves the way for Phase I/II trials in children. Stem/progenitor cell-derived airway transplants that use the patient's cells have the clinical advantage of not requiring anti-rejection medications long-term. Our experience to date indicates such medication is not needed and this finding represents a scientific and clinical breakthrough in organ transplantation. While clear medical benefit was demonstrated in this proof-of-principle, compassionate care case, there is substantial work that must be done before considering such transplants for pediatric patients, and on a large scale, for adults. We address this challenge with our Airway Team and emphasize the synergism resulting from linking Team members with expertise in a variety of related scientific and medical disciplines to address this critical need. This new therapeutic approach could offer a tremendous benefit to children and patients in other age groups in the State of California that are in desperate need of new treatment options.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The citizens of California have generously invested in stem cell research and a return on their investment will include breakthroughs in medical treatments for diseases where there are currently limited options. Stem/progenitor cell-derived airway transplantation is a leading example of translational research in regenerative medicine that can be used for a host of diseases. Through this team effort scientists and physicians will lead the early promise of airway transplantation to clinical trials in California and beyond. The Airway Team proposes to use stem cells to cure an extraordinarily difficult-to-manage and life-threatening health problem in children. Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) in children is a disease that leads to severe airway obstruction and occurs in approximately 200 California children each year. The morbidity and mortality associated with this disease is very high; approximately 25% of patients will die before their first birthday. TBM in children is our target disease, but the knowledge gained from the preclinical studies proposed will provide a new technology that can be applied to other disorders in California populations. We foresee that our stem cell-derived airway transplant could be applied to treat adults with severe tracheomalacia associated with lifelong bronchitis and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the large number of children and adults with severe subglottic stenoses that have proven refractory to standard surgical interventions, and potentially even patients with debilitating laryngeal scarring. Given that the prevalence rate of COPD for California citizens >65 years of age approaches 8-10%, if even 0.1% of COPD patients in California were candidates, then >3,000 patients might benefit from this treatment. The methods and technology developed from this project can also be used as the basis for other similar health needs including esophageal, bladder, and bowel replacements for disorders where present treatments are very limited and impair quality of life. An additional benefit for California citizens will be the establishment of a scientific and clinical Center of Excellence in Airway Disorders in California. The Airway Team project will provide a cornerstone of a larger Airway Center that will serve a diverse population of California patients. Our Team will provide the impetus to better coordinate and share the considerable knowledge and resources that are presently used to treat adults and children with COPD, asthma, cystic fibrosis, and other upper airway disorders for which new treatment options are desperately needed.
Progress Report: 
  • It is estimated that by 2020, over 450,000 Californians will suffer from vision loss or blindness due to the age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common retinal degenerative disease in the elderly. AMD is a progressive ocular disease of the part of the retina at the back of the eye, called the macula, which enables people to read, visualize faces, and drive. The disease initially causes distortion in central vision, and eventually leads to legal blindness.
  • A layer of cells at the back of the eye called the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)provide support, protection, and nutrition to the light sensitive photoreceptors in the retina. The dysfunction and/or loss of these RPE cells play a critical role in the loss of the PR’s and hence the blindness in AMD. Effective treatment could be achieved by proper replacement of damaged RPE and retinal cells with healthy ones. RPE cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are a potentially unlimited and robust source for regenerating RPE (hESC-RPE).
  • During the first year of our Disease Team Grant we have assembled a closely working team of interdisciplinary scientists and physician scientists at the University of Southern California (USC), Doheny Eye Institute (DEI), University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and City of Hope (COH). Our scientists work and meet together frequently to discuss progress and we have had 2 highly successful full-day retreats; one at USC and one at UCSB.
  • We are on track for each of the Year 1 proposed milestones. During the first year we have made a decision on final selection of hESC line; and have developed protocols for the generation and molecular and functional characterization of hESC-RPE and are transferring these protocols to our manufacturing and regulatory partners at City of Hope. COH has had onsite visits to learn protocols at UCSB and USC and we have had a day-long meeting at COH to further refine protocols and procedures. In collaboration with Caltech we have developed a non-biodegradable substrate on which these cells are grown and where they develop characteristics of mature RPE cells. Specialized surgical instruments have been developed at DEI and Caltech to implant the hESC cells grown on substrate under the retina. We have utilized sophisticated instrumentation to image the retina in live animals and have used these instruments to follow rats with progressive retinal degeneration before and after implantation of the hESC. We have demonstrated that hESC rescue the degeneration and integrate well into the host retina. Sections of these retinas are evaluated histologically at the microscopic level using sophisticated quantitative imaging techniques.
  • Our group is composed of unique multidisciplinary members who collectively have more than two decades of experience in efforts to restore sight to the blind as well as retinal cell transplantation and stem cell research. Our ultimate goal is to submit an Investigational New Drug (IND) Application to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) by the end of the 4th year of the grant in order to get approval to conduct a clinical trial in patients at risk of vision loss due to AMD.
  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a devastating disease that can lead to severe vision impairment and blindness. Vision loss in AMD usually is after age 55 and affects almost 2 million Americans.
  • Vision is initiated by light striking and activating specific cells called photoreceptor cells of the neural retina within the eye. There is a small, specialized region in the central portion of the retina called the macula that is particularly important for central, sharp and color vision. It has a high percentage of photoreceptor cells called "cone cells" and it is this region that is most affected by AMD. Thus, with cone cell degeneration in AMD, a person loses their central, sharp vision with color vision affected as well.
  • In the normal retina, photoreceptor cells are supported metabolically and structurally by a thin layer of cells next to them called Retinal Pigment Epithelial (RPE)Cells. Without these RPE cells, photoreceptor cells quickly degenerate and die. In AMD, it is thought that dysfunction of RPE cells is an early and critical sign of AMD. Thus, replacing dead or dying RPE cells in AMD could be a way to slow the disease process and even improve vision.
  • Our CIRM disease team grant which we call The California Project to Cure Blindness aims to treat AMD through replacement of these dysfunctional RPE cells with fresh RPE cells that will then keep photoreceptor cells alive and functioning. Because only very few RPE cells are present in a human eye, direct RPE transplantation would be very difficult so we rely on the use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Through the work in our CIRM funded disease team grant we have been able to use a particular stem cell line and differentiate into adult-like RPE cells that exhibit many characteristics of normal mature human RPE cells. We believe that implanting these hESCs within the eye next to the retina could be of benefit in AMD in saving the photoreceptors.
  • Our technique is to not only implant the hESC derived RPE cells in the eye but to place them on a special ultrathin substrate platform that will maintain them in proper orientation next to the retina. Moreover, implantation can be done with hESC cells that had been allowed to differentiate in tissue culture prior to implantation, insuring that the implanted cells indeed express the characteristics of mature, functional RPE cells.
  • In this last year, substantial progress has been made in progressing to our goal of replenishing RPE cells in the AMD retina and restoring vision. First, a specific hESC line has been identified that will differentiate into cells that have many of the morphological and biochemical characteristics of normal adult RPE cells. Second, an appropriate material has been found that can act as a substratum (platform) that will support the RPE cells and allow them to function in a normal manner. Third, we have begun to demonstrated the safety of our procedure as well as its efficacy in slowing vision loss in a rodent model of retina degeneration. Fourth, we also have developed unique surgical techniques that will allow us to safely and effectively place the cells in the animal and ultimately human eyes.
  • In parallel to these basic studies, we are advancing our strategies that will let us treat human patients with AMD. Clinical protocols are being established that will be submitted to the US FDA to gain their approval in order to start phase 1 (early) Clinical Trial. In summary, our CIRM grant has allowed us to develop a procedure that should let us treat severe vision loss in AMD. Already, data at 6 months in animal studies has demonstrated the safety of the technique as well as the restoration of functional vision in a model system. Hopefully, this will lead us to a successful human clinical trial with sight restoration in currently untreatable cases of dry AMD.
  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a devastating disease that can lead to severe vision impairment and blindness. Vision loss in AMD usually is after age 55 and affects almost 2 million Americans.
  • Vision is initiated by light striking and activating specific cells called photoreceptor cells of the neural retina within the eye. There is a small, specialized region in the central portion of the retina called the macula that is particularly important for central, sharp and color vision. It has a high percentage of photoreceptor cells called "cone cells" and it is this region that is most affected by AMD. Thus, with cone cell degeneration in AMD, a person loses their central, sharp vision with color vision affected as well.
  • In the normal retina, photoreceptor cells are supported metabolically and structurally by a thin layer of cells next to them called Retinal Pigment Epithelial (RPE)Cells. Without these RPE cells, photoreceptor cells quickly degenerate and die. In AMD, it is thought that dysfunction of RPE cells is an early and critical sign of AMD. Thus, replacing dead or dying RPE cells in AMD could be a way to slow the disease process and even improve vision.
  • Our CIRM disease team grant which we call The California Project to Cure Blindness aims to treat AMD through replacement of these dysfunctional RPE cells with fresh RPE cells that will then keep photoreceptor cells alive and functioning. Because only very few RPE cells are present in a human eye, direct RPE transplantation would be very difficult so we rely on the use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Through the work in our CIRM funded disease team grant we have been able to use a particular stem cell line and differentiate into adult-like RPE cells that exhibit many characteristics of normal mature human RPE cells. We believe that implanting these hESCs within the eye next to the retina could be of benefit in AMD in saving the photoreceptors.
  • Our technique is to not only implant the hESC derived RPE cells in the eye but to place them on a special ultrathin substrate platform that will maintain them in proper orientation next to the retina. Moreover, implantation can be done with hESC cells that had been allowed to differentiate in tissue culture prior to implantation, insuring that the implanted cells indeed express the characteristics of mature, functional RPE cells.
  • In this last year, substantial progress has been made in progressing to our goal of replenishing RPE cells in the AMD retina and restoring vision. First, a specific hESC line has been identified that will differentiate into cells that have many of the morphological and biochemical characteristics of normal adult RPE cells. Second, an appropriate material has been found that can act as a substratum (platform) that will support the RPE cells and allow them to function in a normal manner. Third, we have begun to demonstrated the safety of our procedure as well as its efficacy in slowing vision loss in a rodent model of retina degeneration. Fourth, we also have developed unique surgical techniques that will allow us to safely and effectively place the cells in the animal and ultimately human eyes.
  • In parallel to these basic studies, we are advancing our strategies that will let us treat human patients with AMD. Clinical protocols are being established that will be submitted to the US FDA to gain their approval in order to start phase 1 (early) Clinical Trial. In summary, our CIRM grant has allowed us to develop a procedure that should let us treat severe vision loss in AMD. Already, data at 6 months in animal studies has demonstrated the safety of the technique as well as the restoration of functional vision in a model system. Hopefully, this will lead us to a successful human clinical trial with sight restoration in currently untreatable cases of dry AMD.
  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a devastating disease that can lead to severe vision impairment and blindness. Vision loss in AMD usually is after age 55 and affects almost 2 million Americans.
  • Vision is initiated by light striking and activating specific cells called photoreceptor cells of the neural retina within the eye. There is a small, specialized region in the central portion of the retina called the macula that is particularly important for central, sharp and color vision. It has a high percentage of photoreceptor cells called "cone cells" and it is this region that is most affected by AMD. Thus, with cone cell degeneration in AMD, a person loses their central, sharp vision with color vision affected as well.
  • In the normal retina, photoreceptor cells are supported metabolically and structurally by a thin layer of cells next to them called Retinal Pigment Epithelial (RPE)Cells. Without these RPE cells, photoreceptor cells quickly degenerate and die. In AMD, it is thought that dysfunction of RPE cells is an early and critical sign of AMD. Thus, replacing dead or dying RPE cells in AMD could be a way to slow the disease process and even improve vision.
  • Our CIRM disease team grant which we call The California Project to Cure Blindness aims to treat AMD through replacement of these dysfunctional RPE cells with fresh RPE cells that will then keep photoreceptor cells alive and functioning. Because only very few RPE cells are present in a human eye, direct RPE transplantation would be very difficult so we rely on the use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Through the work in our CIRM funded disease team grant we have been able to use a particular stem cell line and differentiate into adult-like RPE cells that exhibit many characteristics of normal mature human RPE cells. We believe that implanting these hESCs within the eye next to the retina could be of benefit in AMD in saving the photoreceptors.
  • Our technique is to not only implant the hESC derived RPE cells in the eye but to place them on a special ultrathin substrate platform that will maintain them in proper orientation next to the retina. Moreover, implantation can be done with hESC cells that had been allowed to differentiate in tissue culture prior to implantation, insuring that the implanted cells indeed express the characteristics of mature, functional RPE cells.
  • In this last year, substantial progress has been made in progressing to our goal of replenishing RPE cells in the AMD retina and restoring vision. First, a specific hESC line has been identified that will differentiate into cells that have many of the morphological and biochemical characteristics of normal adult RPE cells. Second, an appropriate material has been found that can act as a substratum (platform) that will support the RPE cells and allow them to function in a normal manner. Third, we have begun to demonstrated the safety of our procedure as well as its efficacy in slowing vision loss in a rodent model of retina degeneration. Fourth, we also have developed unique surgical techniques that will allow us to safely and effectively place the cells in the animal and ultimately human eyes.
  • In parallel to these basic studies, we are advancing our strategies that will let us treat human patients with AMD. Clinical protocols are being established that will be submitted to the US FDA to gain their approval in order to start phase 1 (early) Clinical Trial. In summary, our CIRM grant has allowed us to develop a procedure that should let us treat severe vision loss in AMD. Already, data at 6 months in animal studies has demonstrated the safety of the technique as well as the restoration of functional vision in a model system. Hopefully, this will lead us to a successful human clinical trial with sight restoration in currently untreatable cases of dry AMD.

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine