Unraveling the Molecular Wiring that Controls Endothelial Cell Plasticity

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-07341
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$0
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Blood vessels, the pipes that serve as conduits for nutrients and oxygen, are critical for the repair and regeneration of any human tissue/organ. Our work focuses in developing novel technology to effectively grow the cells involved in the formation of new blood vessels. The findings generated thus far, and presented in this application as preliminary support, indicate that a specific subset of genes effectively regulates the metabolism of vessel-forming cells and drastically change their proliferative potential. The experiments outlined in this application will further explore these initial findings to improve upon this technology and understand the underlying reasons (mechanisms) that drive this change in proliferation potential. Findings from this application are likely to significantly improve our ability to generate blood vessels in a large number of tissues and thus, the present application has broad implications for regenerative medicine.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Regenerative Biology is clearly the next frontier in Medicine. Research advances performed by investigators in California will result in patents benefiting the University and the State. Specifically within this application, the technology to be investigated has the potential to significantly improve our ability to give rise to cells that form blood vessels. These cells are critical to construct the pipes (blood vessels) that deliver nutrients and oxygen and that are essential in the regeneration of any tissue. In this manner, findings from the outlined experiments are likely to be incorporated in a large number of applications aiming at renewal, repair and /or de novo reconstruction of multiple tissue types, as blood vessels are an integral part of all human organs. In addition, the present proposal will offer employment and training to at least two individuals.

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine