Therapeutic Potential of Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

Funding Type: 
SEED Grant
Grant Number: 
RS1-00256
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$0
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in the United States. Blood vessel replacement is a common treatment for vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, restenosis and aneurysm, with over 300,000 artery bypass procedures performed each year. However, vein grafts are limited to their availability and the additional cost and surgeries, and small-diameter synthetic vascular grafts have frequent clogging due to thrombogenesis. Tissue engineering is a promising approach to the fabrication of non-thrombogenic vascular grafts, but the reliable and expandable cell sources for tissue-engineered vascular graft (TEVG) have not been established. Our long-term objectives are to engineer stem cells and nanostructured biomaterials for the repair and regeneration of cardiovascular tissues. In this project, we will investigate the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into vascular cells, and use hESC-derived cells and nanostructured scaffolds to construct TEVGs that are non-thrombogenic, are capable of self-remodeling, and have long-term patency. This study will generate insights into the differentiation and regeneration potential of hESCs and their derived cells in vascular microenvironment, and help to establish a stable cell source for cardiovascular repair and therapies, which will benefit our health care in the near future.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in the United States. Our long-term objectives are to engineer stem cells and nanostructured biomaterials for the repair and regeneration of cardiovascular tissues. In this project, we will investigate the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into vascular cells, and use hESC-derived cells and nanostructured scaffolds to construct tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) that are non-thrombogenic, are capable of self-remodeling, and have long-term patency. This study will generate insights into the differentiation and regeneration potential of hESCs and their derived cells in vascular microenvironment, and help to establish a stable cell source for cardiovascular repair and therapies. TEVGs will benefit patients and reduce our cost for health care. For example, the additional surgeries, cost and morbidity for harvesting autologous blood vessels can be avoided, and the clogging of synthetic vascular grafts can be minimized. Furthermore, hESC-derived vascular progenitors could be used to fabricate TEVGs that are available off-the-shelf.

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine