Regenerative Strategies for Cardiac and Vascular Injury

Funding Type: 
Disease Team Planning
Grant Number: 
DT1-00668
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$0
Public Abstract: 
Despite medical advances, heart disease remains a leading cause of disability and death. After suffering a heart attack patients can become debilitated and go on to develop heart failure and sudden death due to irregular heart beats. Although current therapies slow the progression of heart disease after injury, there are few, if any options, to reverse or repair damage. The goal of the {REDACTED} Cardiovascular Disease Team is to develop a safe and reliable regenerative therapy for patients who have suffered a heart attack to prevent the detrimental changes that happen after a heart attack. Although many animal studies have demonstrated the ability of injected adult stem cells to improve heart function after a heart attack this benefit often did not persist and true regeneration and engraftment of the cells was questionable. Unfortunately studies in humans have had variable results. This may be related to inconsistent isolation and quality of tested cell types or inefficient delivery systems. This proposal will focus on integrated strategies to repair the heart after ischemic injury. We are proposing to create techniques to generate human induced pluripotent stem (hIPS) cells that can be used in patients. These cells, which are patient-specific pluripotent stem cells, resemble embryonic stem cells. These cells will be used to generate cardiovascular progenitor cells, which will be tested for safety and efficacy in a pig model of ischemic cardiac injury using clinically applicable delivery systems. Complementary strategies will also be developed to promote new blood vessel formation and new materials to promote stem cell differentiation and engraftment. These techniques will be the basis of future clinical trials of cardiovascular cell therapy that allow truly regenerative therapy.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases are the #1 killer in California. Despite medical advances, heart disease remains a leading cause of disability and death. Recent estimates of its cost to the U.S. healthcare system amounts to almost $300 billion dollars. Although current therapies slow the progression of heart disease, there are few, if any options, to reverse or repair damage. Thus, regenerative therapies that restore normal heart function would have an enormous societal and financial impact not only on Californians, but the U.S. more generally. The research that is proposed in this application could lead to new therapies that would restore heart function after and heart attack and prevent the development of heart failure and death.

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine