Generation of disease models for neurodegenerative disorders in hESCs by gene targeting

Generation of disease models for neurodegenerative disorders in hESCs by gene targeting

Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies I
Grant Number: 
RT1-01107
Award Value: 
$709,829
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Status: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Progress Report: 

Year 1

The overall objectives for this proposal are to create in vitro human neurodegenerative disease models and to elucidate pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an adult onset fatal motoneuron disease. Using gene targeting and reprogramming technology, we have created ALS disease models in human pluripotent stem cells and are generating neural lineage reporters which will facilitate the downstream efforts on systemic characterization of these diseased cell lines, at undifferentiated stage and after induced lineage differentiation toward motoneurons and astrocytes. These experiments will not only provide direct clues for ALS pathogenesis but also serve as a proof of principle for general disease research using human pluripotent stem cells as a model system. We also aim to provide optimized protocols for easy to access gene targeting which eventually facilitate the development of personalized medicine, the future of regenerative medicine. The novel targeting protocol combined with our experience on directed differentiation along the neural lineage will not only will make tools to move the pathogenesis research for ALS, but also can be reliably extended to other neural and non-neural diseases, of which genetic defects have been identified, including Huntington's disease and Parkinson’s disease.

Year 2

The overall objectives for this proposal are to create in vitro human neurodegenerative disease models for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an adult onset fatal motoneuron disease. Using gene targeting, site-specific integration and reprogramming technology, we have created ALS disease models in human pluripotent stem cells and generated neural lineage reporters which will facilitate the downstream efforts on systemic characterization of these diseased cell lines, at undifferentiated stage and after forced lineage differentiation toward motoneurons and astrocytes. We have optimized protocols for gene targeting using homologous recombination and site-specific integration and insertion. The novel targeting protocol combined with our experience on directed differentiation along the neural lineage are useful tools to pathogenesis research for ALS, as well as to other neural and non-neural diseases, including Huntington's disease and Parkinson’s disease.

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine