“Differential proteomic panning analysis of protein from single stem cells: An alternative to mass spectrometric methods”

Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies I
Grant Number: 
RT1-01101
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$0
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
In children, cancers are the deadliest of diseases and second only to accidents as the leading cause of death. Cancers of the brain are the worst. Our current forms of therapy for these diseases can best be described as brutal: brain surgery followed by administration of very high doses of very toxic drugs and exposure to high doses of radiation. The deadliest of the brain cancers are the malignant gliomas. All children with this type of cancer die and in all cases the course of the disease and its treatment are horrific. About two-thirds of children can survive the rest of the types of brain cancers but two-thirds of these survivors go on to have a recurrence of their cancer. Even more heartbreaking is the fact that those that do survive are usually left with lifelong disabilities. Emerging evidence indicates that brain tumor stem cells are responsible for recurrence of many of these cancers. It is essential to identify the proteomic differences between normal stem cells and tumor stem cells for targeted destruction of brain tumor stem cells. Existing proteomic technologies still have many constraints and limitations. Our patented Differential Proteomic Panning (DiPP™) technology platform is much more sensitive and effective in identifying the surface markers than any existing methods. This proposal if funded by CIRM will pave the way for promoting DiPP™ to be used for proteomic studies of single-stem-cells.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Malignant brain cancers are a leading cause of cancer death. Three decades of research have resulted in little change to the outcome of these lethal brain cancers. For example, virtually all patients die after being diagnosed a diffuse brainstem glioma. Of the two-thirds of patients who survive at least 5 years after being diagnosed with any brain cancer, more than two-thirds go on to have a recurrence of their disease. Moreover, the treatments that these patients suffer can only be described as brutal and most of those that do survive are left with life-long mental disabilities. Overall estimates of the incidence of brain cancers in the United States show that about 20,000 will be diagnosed annually with about 2,500 in California. Given these statistics, the costs for the patient and family cannot be overestimated. The economic costs are also grim. Repeated use of physician, inpatient, outpatient and laboratory services as well as lost future earnings and occurrence of secondary diseases are projected to cost Californians more than 1.5 billion dollars annually. It is clear that California patients with brain cancers need a new therapeutic approach. One promising approach is to target brain tumor stem cells. It is essential to identify the proteomic differences between normal stem cells and tumor stem cells for targeted destruction of brain tumor stem cells. Existing proteomic technologies still have many constraints and limitations. Our patented Differential Proteomic Panning (DiPP™) technology platform is much more sensitive and effective in identifying the surface markers for targeting brain tumors stem cells, than any existing methods. This proposal if funded by CIRM will pave the way for promoting DiPP™ to be used for proteomic studies of single-stem-cells, which can be used for other brain diseases and injuries as well. Other long-term economic impact is the opportunity to train more student scientists in the field of stem cell technology, facilitating and promoting California's biotechnology industry.

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine