Laying the groundwork for building a tooth: analysis of dental epithelial stem cells

Laying the groundwork for building a tooth: analysis of dental epithelial stem cells

Funding Type: 
New Faculty II
Grant Number: 
RN2-00933
Award Value: 
$3,075,251
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Embryonic Stem Cell
Status: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Progress Report: 

Year 1

In this first year of the New Faculty award, my colleagues and I have initiated work on all 3 Aims. We have made significant progress on Aim 1, which focuses on the study of mouse dental stem cells in the animal. The mouse incisor provides an excellent model for studying the processes that underlie the ability of epithelial stem cells to contribute to tissue renewal, because its continuous growth requires generation of all the necessary cell types from adult stem cells. Currently, relatively little is known about how this continuous growth is achieved, and one of the main focuses of this CIRM grant is to understand this process. We are preparing a manuscript based on the results from sub-Aim 1D, and we also expect that a second manuscript will be prepared during the coming year on sub-Aim 1C. For the experiments in Aim 2, we have devoted considerable time to developing the adult dental stem cell culture system, and we intend to submit a manuscript describing the system and conditions during the coming year. We have begun to work on experiments in Aim 3, using human fetal ameloblasts and embryonic stem cells, and have some exciting preliminary data for this Aim.

Year 2

In the second year of the New Faculty award, my colleagues and I have continued work on all 3 Aims. We have made further progress on Aim 1, which focuses on the study of mouse dental stem cells in the animal. The mouse incisor provides an excellent model for studying the processes that underlie the ability of epithelial stem cells to contribute to tissue renewal, because its continuous growth requires generation of all the necessary cell types from adult stem cells. Currently, relatively little is known about how this continuous growth is achieved, and one of the main focuses of this CIRM grant is to understand this process. We have published two manuscripts based on the results from Aim 1, and we expect that a third manuscript will be prepared during the coming year resulting from the work on Aim 1. For the experiments in Aim 2, we have devoted considerable time to developing the adult dental stem cell culture system, and we intend to submit a manuscript describing the system and conditions during the coming year. We continue to work on experiments in Aim 3, using human fetal ameloblasts and embryonic stem cells, and have generated more data for this Aim.

Year 3

In the third year of the New Faculty award, my colleagues and I have continued work on all 3 Aims. We have continued to make progress on Aim 1, which focuses on the study of mouse dental stem cells in the animal. The mouse incisor provides an excellent model for studying the processes that underlie the ability of epithelial stem cells to contribute to tissue renewal, because its continuous growth requires generation of all the necessary cell types from adult stem cells. As little is known about how this continuous growth is achieved, one of the main focuses of this CIRM grant is to understand this process. We have published several manuscripts based on the results from Aim 1, and we expect that another manuscript will be prepared during the coming year resulting from the work on Aim 1. For the experiments in Aim 2, we have been developing the adult dental stem cell culture system, and we are in the final stages of preparing a manuscript describing the system and conditions. We continue to work on experiments in Aim 3, using human fetal ameloblasts and embryonic stem cells, and have generated more data for this Aim.

Year 4

In the fourth year of the New Faculty award, my colleagues and I have continued work on all 3 Aims. We have made significant progress on Aim 1, which focuses on the study of mouse dental stem cells in the animal. The mouse incisor provides an excellent model for studying the processes that underlie the ability of epithelial stem cells to contribute to tissue renewal, because its continuous growth requires generation of all the necessary cell types from adult stem cells. As little is known about how this continuous growth is achieved, one of the main focuses of this CIRM grant is to understand this process. We have published several manuscripts over the past year based on the results from Aim 1, and we expect that at least one more manuscript will be prepared during the coming year resulting from the work on Aim 1. For the experiments in Aim 2, we have been developing the adult dental stem cell culture system, and we have just published a manuscript describing the system and conditions. We continue to work on experiments in Aim 3, using human fetal ameloblasts and embryonic stem cells, and have generated more data for this Aim that we intend to publish in the coming year.

Year 5

In the fifth and final year of the New Faculty award, my colleagues and I have completed work on all 3 Aims. We have completed Aim 1, which focuses on the study of mouse dental stem cells in the animal. The mouse incisor provides an excellent model for studying the processes that underlie the ability of epithelial stem cells to contribute to tissue renewal, because its continuous growth requires generation of all the necessary cell types from adult stem cells. As little is known about how this continuous growth is achieved, one of the main focuses of this CIRM grant was to understand this process. We have published several manuscripts over the course of the grant based on the results from Aim 1. For the experiments in Aim 2, we have developed the adult dental stem cell culture system, and we have published a manuscript describing the system and conditions. We have also completed the work in Aim 3, using human fetal ameloblasts and embryonic stem cells, and have published this work.

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine